Genius of the Transcendent – Mystical Writings of Jakob Boehme


Description of Genius of the Transcendent – Translated by Michael L. Birkel, Jeff Bach

Here, for the spiritual adventurers of our own age, is an accessible introduction to one of the most important of the Christian mystical writers. Jakob Boehme (1575–1624) was a humble shoemaker of Görlitz in eastern Germany who, in response to the visionary experiences that began for him as a teenager, wrote a series of theosophical treatises that explore the nature of God and humanity.

His ability to give words to the ineffable has never been surpassed, and his influence can be felt in the generations of mystics who followed him, as well as in Pietists, German Romantics, Quakers, and American utopianists, among many others. Five of Boehme’s most essential works are presented here in fresh translations that demonstrate why Underhill called him “one of the most astonishing cases in history of a natural genius for the transcendent.”

Contents
Life Beyond the Senses – 29
The New Birth – 57
True Yieldedness – 95
The Incarnation of Jesus Christ- 125
Six Mystical Points – 151

Jakob Boehme – (1575-1624), German Lutheran theosophical author Boehme, the German mystic, was born in the East German town of Goerlitz in 1575. He had little in the way of an education and made his living as a shoemaker; he married and had four children.

His thought drew on interests including Paracelsus, the Kabbala, alchemy and the Hermetic tradition. His first written work, Aurora, went unfinished, but drew to him a small circle of followers. Like Eckhart and others, Boehme’s thought drew fire from the church authorities, who silenced Boehme for five years before he continued writing in secrecy.

He again raised the cockles of church authorities, and he was banished from his home. He died soon thereafter, in 1624, after returning home from Dresden. His last words spoken, as he was surrounded by his family, were reported to be, “Now I go hence into Paradise.”

His thought has since influenced major figures in philosophy, especially German Romantics such as Hegel, Baader, and Schelling. Indirectly, his influence can be traced to the work of Schopenhauer, Nietzsche, Hartmann, Bergson, and Heidegger. Further, Paul Tillich and Martin Buber drew heavily from his work — as did the psychologist, Carl Jung, who made numerous references to Boehme in his writings.

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