No Storm Lasts Forever Transforming Suffering Into Insight by Dr. Terry Gordon

As a cardiologist,Dr. Terry Gordon dealt with life-and-death circumstances on a daily basis. He learned that life is precious and tenuous; it can change in an instant. Such a dramatic shift occurred when his son, Tyler, was involved in a car accident, sustaining a severe spinal-cord injury that left him paralyzed. Leading his family through the experience, Terry’s journey resulted in a spiritual awakening to a clearer understanding of life and the truths it has to offer.

Terry has learned that our experiences become calamities only if we make the conscious decision to make tragedies out of them. Rather than lamenting the so-called adversities, we can choose to be grateful for them, embracing them as gifts from the Divine. These gifts provide fertile soil for growth and enlightenment, offering us the opportunity to transform turmoil, disappointment, and suffering into understanding, insight, and resolve . . . and such gifts are presented to you in No Storm Lasts Forever.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Dr. Terry Gordon, a Cleveland Clinic–trained cardiologist, practiced within mainstream medicine for over two decades. Named the American Heart Association’s National Physician of the Year in 2002, Terry is nationally recognized in matters of the heart. As a motivational speaker, he has shared the stage with Dr. Wayne Dyer; as a musician, he is the co-host of Docs Who Rock, a United Way event. He is currently spearheading a national campaign called The Josh Miller HEARTS Act, which will place Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) in every school in the country, protecting from sudden cardiac arrest our most precious resource: our children. Website http://www.drterrygordon.com

No storm lasts forever – Dr Terry Gordon

In his soon to be published book by Hay House No Storm Lasts Forever, Terry shares with us from personal experience how a so-called tragedy in one’s life can actually be a blessing in disguise.

“When adversity comes our way, it is how we respond to that difficulty that determines who we are. Our life experiences become calamities only if we make the conscious decision to make tragedies out of them. We might just as easily choose to view them as opportunities for personal growth.”

“The difficult days we experience can become the driving force of change. Rather than lamenting adversity, we can choose to be grateful for it. We can embrace and accept it as a gift from the Divine. Within these gifts are the lessons that can promote our development and maturation. By being grateful for adversity, we can see it as an opportunity to transform turmoil, disappointment, or suffering into understanding, insight, or resolve.” – http://www.drterrygordon.com/

The Nature Principle: Human Restoration and the End of Nature-Deficit Disorder ~ Richard Louv

“The future will belong to the nature-smart—those individuals, families, businesses, and political leaders who develop a deeper understanding of the transformative power of the natural world and who balance the virtual with the real. The more high-tech we become, the more nature we need.”
—Richard Louv

In his bestselling book Last Child in the Woods, Richard Louv sparked a national debate that spawned an international movement to reconnect kids and nature. He coined the term nature-deficit disorder; influenced national policy; and helped inspire campaigns in over eighty cities, states, and provinces throughout North America. In The Nature Principle, Louv delivers another powerful call to action—this time for adults.

Supported by groundbreaking research, anecdotal evidence, and compelling personal stories, Louv identifies seven basic concepts that can help us reshape our lives. By tapping into the restorative powers of nature, we can boost mental acuity and creativity; promote health and wellness; build smarter and more sustainable businesses, communities, and economies; and ultimately strengthen human bonds.

Louv makes a convincing case that we are entering the most creative period in history, that in fact the twenty-first century will be the era of human restoration in the natural world. This encouraging and influential work offers renewed optimism while challenging us to rethink the way we live.

Richard Louv’s The Nature Principle

The immediacy of Richard Louv’s message in Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder galvanized an international movement to reconnect children with nature. Now, in The Nature Principle, Louv reaches even further with a powerful call to action for the rest of us.

Our society, says Louv, has developed such an outsized faith in technology that we have yet to fully realize or even adequately study how human capacities are enhanced through the power of nature. Supported by groundbreaking research, anecdotal evidence, and compelling personal stories, Louv shows us how tapping into the restorative powers of the natural world can boost mental acuity and creativity; promote health and wellness; build smarter and more sustainable businesses, communities, and economies; and ultimately strengthen human bonds. As he says in his introduction, The Nature Principle is “about the power of living in nature—not with it, but in it. We are entering the most creative period in history. The twenty-first century will be the century of human restoration in the natural world.”

Richard Louv makes a convincing case that through a nature-balanced existence—driven by sound economic, social, and environmental solutions—the human race can and will thrive. This timely, inspiring, and important work will give readers renewed hope while challenging them to rethink the way we live

A conservation with Richard Louv

Brooke Langston, Richardson Bay Audubon Center Director, talks with Audubon Medal recipient Richard Louv about a topic they are mutually passionate about nature.

The Timeless Origins of the Tarot Cards

The word Tarot does not have a specific translation, as it is derived form an uncertain etymology. We can find variations that go from tarock, tarok, tarocco, tarocchi. It is believed that the word stemmed from the Arab turuq, which means the “Four Pathways”.

A lot has been said about the origins of the Tarot, aside for the history told about their “re-appearance” in Europe in the mid-15th century, It seems, in fact, that the tarot has it beginnings in old temples of initiation of ancient times.

One of the many legends surrounding the Cards or Tablets comes from the period that preceded the decline of the Ancient Egypt culture and spiritual system. It is said that the High Priests, foreseeing the decadence of Human-kind and the beginning of an Era of Darkness, held a council to decide on how to preserve the ancient knowledge and Ageless Wisdom for the future generations. Many indicated that the best way to keep the sacred secrets guarded was through the hands of those that were virtuous and honorable individuals.

But others argued that, in truth during the dark ages, many would fall into the traps of self and would not be able to pass through the generations the archetypical knowledge of the Tablets. After much debate, they decided that the only reliable way to immortalize these Tablets of Knowledge was in trusting in vices instead of the virtues. In doing this, they trusted that the Wisdom of the Ages would manifest by the actions and influence of the Higher Self of the person that received the archetypical templates.

In order to continue the preservation of the ancient wisdom, the Priests developed the tablets with the pictorial representation of the archetypes and invented different types of games to be taught to the common people so they would be able to spread the influence of these powerful energies around, hoping they will reach the right hands.

As Egypt was the main strategic point of the ancient world where all the commerce, culture, knowledge and political control abounded and was disseminated to the neighboring regions. It was not a difficult task to spread the card games to sailors and merchants who gladly spread them to the diverse regions of the ancient world.

Traditionally, the common card readings are associated with the prototype of the Gypsies, generally nomadic tribes that traveled the world selling goods and doing readings to those interested in knowing their future. Perhaps the name “gypsies” came originally from the word “Egypt”, and the gypsies were the ones that inherited the Tarot Cards and knowledge from the original Egyptians

The Astrology of July 2012 ~ Carl Boudreau


July’s chart is a comparatively faint reflection, a mirror image of June’s. Some might experience mild aftershocks. But for most it will be a time to reflect, recuperate, reconsider and regroup. Issues as well as possibilities – both – will increase in complexity. July is a month to dig deeper and prepare more fully.

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