A Taste of Tagore ~ By Rabindranath Tagore, compiled by Meron Shapland Foreword by Deepak Chopra


A Taste of Tagore enables some of the magical poetry, elegant prose and meaningful prayers of Rabindranath Tagore, India’s first Nobel Laureate, to be used as contemplations in our daily lives. These extracts are taken from his many writings about the environment, education, the arts, politics, travel and humanism. Tagore’s lifestyle embraced simplicity, moderation in consumption, cohesion and harmony between religions, cultures and countries. A Taste of Tagore presents the diversity, depth and spirituality of his writings in one book.

The publishing of this book coincides with UNESCO’s declaration of 2011 as the Year of Tagore to celebrate the 150th anniversary of his birth in Bengal. The selection was compiled by Meron Shapland, and includes a forward by Deepak Chopra.

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Rare videos of Nobel Laureate Rabindranath Tagore 1861-1941

Rabindranath Tagore (Bengali: রবীন্দ্রনাথ ঠাকুর) (7 May 1861 — 7 August 1941), sobriquet Gurudev, was a Bengali polymath who reshaped Bengali literature and music. Author of Gitanjali and its “profoundly sensitive, fresh and beautiful verse”, he was the first non-European Nobel laureate. His poetry in translation was viewed as spiritual, and this together with his mesmerizing persona gave him a prophet-like aura in the West. His “elegant prose and magical poetry” remain largely unknown outside Bengal.

A Pirali Brahmin from Kolkata, Tagore had been writing poetry since he was eight years old. At age 16, he published his first substantial poetry under the pseudonym Bhanushingho (“Sun Lion”) and wrote his first short stories and dramas in 1877. Tagore achieved further note when he denounced the British Raj and supported Indian independence. His efforts endure in his vast canon and in the institution he founded, Visva-Bharati University.

These rare videos have been collated from other YouTube contributors. The recital at the beginning is by an unknown narrator. The poem is from the ‘Gitanjali’. the work for which Tagore won the Nobel prize in literature in 1913. I found the recital quite brilliant and took the liberty of using it to supplement the mute videos. The song of Tagore which follows is vocalised by Kavita Krishnamurti

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