The Secret Teachings of Plants : The Intelligence of the Heart in the Direct Perception of Nature By Stephen Harrod Buhner


Reveals the use of direct perception in understanding Nature, medicinal plants, and the healing of human disease

• Explores the techniques used by indigenous and Western peoples to learn directly from the plants themselves, including those of Henry David Thoreau, Goethe, and Masanobu Fukuoka, author of The One Straw Revolution

• Contains leading-edge information on the heart as an organ of perception

All ancient and indigenous peoples insisted their knowledge of plant medicines came from the plants themselves and not through trial-and-error experimentation. Less well known is that many Western peoples made this same assertion. There are, in fact, two modes of cognition available to all human beings–the brain-based linear and the heart-based holistic. The heart-centered mode of perception can be exceptionally accurate and detailed in its information gathering capacities if, as indigenous and ancient peoples asserted, the heart’s ability as an organ of perception is developed.

Author Stephen Harrod Buhner explores this second mode of perception in great detail through the work of numerous remarkable people, from Luther Burbank, who cultivated the majority of food plants we now take for granted, to the great German poet and scientist Goethe and his studies of the metamorphosis of plants. Buhner explores the commonalities among these individuals in their approach to learning from the plant world and outlines the specific steps involved. Readers will gain the tools necessary to gather information directly from the heart of Nature, to directly learn the medicinal uses of plants, to engage in diagnosis of disease, and to understand the soul-making process that such deep connection with the world engenders.

Stephen Harrod Buhner
Stephen Harrod Buhner is an Earth poet and the award-winning author of ten books on nature, indigenous cultures, the environment, and herbal medicine. He comes from a long line of healers including Leroy Burney, Surgeon General of the United States under Eisenhower and Kennedy, and Elizabeth Lusterheide, a midwife and herbalist who worked in rural Indiana in the early nineteenth century. The greatest influence on his work, however, has been his great-grandfather C.G. Harrod who primarily used botanical medicines, also in rural Indiana, when he began his work as a physician in 1911.

Stephen’s work has appeared or been profiled in publications throughout North America and Europe including Common Boundary, Apotheosis, Shaman’s Drum, The New York Times, CNN, and Good Morning America.

Click here to browse inside.

Daniel Vitalis Interviews Stephen Buhner ~ Part 1/4

Stephen Buhner is an award winning author, poet and a master herbalist

Daniel Vitalis Interviews Stephen Buhner ~ Part 2/4

More than just a profound Herbalist, Stephen is something more like a Bardic Naturalist. His speech is so eloquent that one cannot help but to be inspired (not to mention have their synapses re-networked)!

Daniel Vitalis Interviews Stephen Buhner ~ Part 3/4

Stephen is Reverently Irreverent in his approach to Re-Wilding and shares powerful insights about how we have been changed by domestication. Even more powerful are his strategies to reclaiming ourselves!
Daniel Vitalis Interviews Stephen Buhner ~ Part 4/4

His books have been some of the most influential of any I have read. In Fact, they have fundamentally changed the way that I experience Herbal Medicine! More than that, they set me on a path of using my heart as an organ of perception and cognition! ~Daniel Vitalis

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