Polishing the Mirror How to Live from Your Spiritual Heart by Ram Dass


Publication Date Aug 2013

Sometimes illumination occurs spontaneously or, as Ram Dass experienced, in a heart-wrenching moment of opening. More commonly, it happens when we polish the mirror of the heart with daily practice—and see beyond the illusion of our transient thoughts and emotions to the vast and luminous landscape of our true nature.

For five decades, Ram Dass has explored the depths of consciousness and love and brought them to life as service to others. With Polishing the Mirror, he gathers together his essential teachings for living in the eternal present, here and now.

Readers will find within these pages a rich combination of perennial wisdom, humor, teaching stories, and detailed guidance on Ram Dass’ own spiritual practices, including:

>Bhakti Yoga—opening our hearts to unconditional love
>Practices for living, aging, dying, and embracing the natural flow of life
>Karma Yoga—how selfless service can profoundly transform us
>Working with fear and suffering as a path to grace and freedom
>Step-by-step guidance in devotional chant, meditation and mantra practice, and much more.

For those new to Ram Dass’ teachings, and for those to whom they are old friends, here is this vanguard spiritual explorer’s complete guide to discovering who we are and why we are here, and how to become beacons of unconditional love.

Ram Dass means “Servant of God.” Born Richard Alpert, Ram Dass is the founder of the Love Serve Remember Project and co-founder of the Seva Foundation and the Prison Ashram Project. He is the author of the worldwide spiritual classic Be Here Now, and many other books. For more information, visit ramdass.org.

Ram Dass on Compassion in Action

Published on Jun 26, 2013

This is an excerpt from the full 90-minute DVD.
http://www.thinkingallowed.com/2rdass…

Ram Dass probes deeply into the nature of helping relationships. He suggests that when we see deeply into each human being, no matter how desperate the situation, we are able to honor and learn from them. If we view ourselves as the “helper,” we become trapped in the prison of our own self-image — and this interferes with genuine compassion.

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