The Nonviolent Life by John Dear


“How can we become people of nonviolence and help the world become more nonviolent? What does it mean to be a person of active nonviolence? How can we help build a global grassroots movement of nonviolence to disarm the world, relieve unjust human suffering, make a more just society and protect creation and all creatures? What is a nonviolent life?”

These are the questions John Dear, Nobel Peace Prize nominee and Pace e Bene staff member poses in his latest book The Nonviolent Life, available in September. He focuses on three important aspects on the path toward becoming people of nonviolence – being nonviolent toward ourselves; being nonviolent to all others (including creation and creatures); and joining the global grassroots movement of nonviolence. After thirty years of preaching the Gospel of nonviolence John says he has never found a book that completely captures these crucial elements of nonviolent living. According to John, “most people pick one or two of these dimensions, but few do all three. To become a fully rounded, three dimensional person of nonviolence we need to do all three simultaneously.”

In this book, John proposes a simple vision of nonviolence that everyone can aspire to. Order your copy today and journey with John along the path of the nonviolent life.

John Dear is an internationally known voice for peace and nonviolence. He is a popular speaker, peacemaker, organizer, lecturer, retreat leader, and the author/editor of 30 books. John has been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize after having participated in nonviolent campaigns for three decades resulting in over 75 arrests and more than a year of his life spent in jail.

Read more John Dear Here

John Dear, S.J. on Spiritual Activism

Rev. John Dear, S.J. is a priest, pastor, social activist and author. He is the former co-chair of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, and following the events of 9/11, he coordinated the pastoral counseling of victims and bereaved family members. At the May 2006 Conference on Spiritual Activism in Washington, D.C., he spoke about the need for a socially engaged nonviolent movement to revitalize American spiritual and political life.

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