Writing to Wake the Soul: Opening the Sacred Conversation Within ~ Karen Hering [ Updated March 23, 2014 ]

Pub Date Nov 5 2013

Through the power of everyday words, find and deepen your connection with faith and self in the spiritual practice of writing.

Have you ever sought to wake that still, small voice within—the voice that gives expression to your greatest hopes, fears, dreams, and sorrows? Through the intersection of poetry and story, metaphor and mediation, history and culture, you have the power to.

Perfect for today’s spiritual seeker, Writing to Wake the Soul provides inspiration, practical guidance, and content-rich prompts to help you articulate and explore the difficult questions of our time. Its elegant narrative invites you to use words as a way to journey into a greater intimacy with your faith, your soul, and your relationship to the world. Whether you’re a theist or atheist, agnostic or church-goer, accomplished writer or even a non-writer, this guide offers a thoughtful reflection on the enormous transformative power of words in our everyday lives.

Featuring exercises for meditation, contemplation, and gentle self-examination, along with writing prompts on a wide spectrum of theological themes and spiritual practices, Writing to Wake the Soul will help you develop a greater connection to that voice, to the inner self, and to the timeless wisdom deep within you.

Karen Hering is a writer and ordained Unitarian minister. Her emerging ministry of poetry and story, Faithful Words, offers programs that engage writing as a spiritual practice and a tool for social action. Her writing has been published in numerous periodicals and anthologies, including the Amoskeag literary journal, the Star Tribune (Minneapolis), and Creative Transformation. She serves as a consulting literary minister in St. Paul, Minnesota.

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Interview with Karen Hering

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How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow by Toni Bernhard

Intimately and without jargon, How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide to Navigating Joy and Sorrow describes the path to peace amid all of life’s ups and downs. Using step by step instructions, the author illustrates how to be fully present in the moment without clinging to joy or resisting sorrow. This opens the door to a kind of wellness that goes beyond circumstances. Actively engaging life as it is in this fashion holds the potential for awakening to a peace and well-being that are not dependent on whether a particular experience is joyful or sorrowful. This is a practical book, containing dozens of exercises and practices, all of which are illustrated with easy-to-relate to personal stories from the author’s experience.

I’ve been a practicing Buddhist for over 20 years. Until forced to retire due to illness, I was a professor at the University of California–Davis School of Law, serving six years as the dean of students. I’m the author of the award-winning “How to Be Sick: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for the Chronically Ill and Their Caregivers,” and the newly released “How to Wake Up: A Buddhist-Inspired Guide for Navigating Joy and Sorrow.” Both “How to Be Sick” and “How to Wake Up” are practical books. They are intended to help all of us find peace and well-being regardless of our particular circumstances. To this end, each of the books contains dozens of exercises and practices, all of which are illustrated with easy-to-relate-to personal stories. I live in Davis, California with my husband (also named Tony!) and our hound dog, Rusty. I hope you’ll visit my website at http://www.tonibernhard.com

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How to Wake Up – Toni Bernhard – Interview View Here

Experiencing Spirituality: Finding Meaning Through Storytelling by Kurtz Ernest & Ketcham Katherine

From the authors of contemporary classic The Spirituality of Imperfection comes this long-awaited sequel.

A great master once said, ‘The shortest distance between a human being and truth is a story.’ In Experiencing Spirituality, Ernest Kurtz and Katherine Ketcham take readers on a journey through storytelling as a means of self-discovery. Recounting and interpreting great wisdom stories from all ages and all cultures, as well as telling many of their own, the authors shed light on such experiences as awe, wonder, humor, confusion, and forgiveness.

In story after story, seekers look to those whose lives reveal a special quality—sometimes called spirituality—and ask the masters what they must do to attain that same quality. The answer is simple: ‘Come, follow me, and see how I live.’ Experiencing Spirituality teaches through the example of human experience.

Ernest Kurtz received his Ph.D. in the history of American civilization from Harvard University in 1978. He taught American history and the history of religion in America at the University of Georgia and Loyola University of Chicago.

Katherine Ketcham is the cofounder and executive director of a grassroots nonprofit organization called Trilogy Recovery Community, which helps youth and their family members with alcohol and drug problems

Reflections – Ernie Kurtz – The Early History of Alcoholics Anonymous

Reflections – Introduction – Ernie Kurtz on the History of AA, Spirituality, Shame, and Storytelling ~ with Bill White.

William L. White, author of Slaying the Dragon: The
History of Addiction Treatment and Recovery in America

CREDIT: williamwhitepapers

Thank you !!

Reflections – Ernie Kurtz – Introduction

Reflections – Ernie Kurtz – Chapter 1: The Early History of Alcoholics Anonymous

Reflections – Ernie Kurtz – Chapter 2: Spirituality

Reflections – Ernie Kurtz – Chapter 3: Shame & Mentoring

The Collected Ernie Kurtz – http://hindsfoot.org/ktcek1.html

Ernest Kurtz has been the outstanding thinker of the A.A. tradition’s second generation, the one who played a constant leadership role in pushing the movement towards the highest professional standards of history writing and supplied some of its most influential interpretive concepts.

His ideas are vitally important for anyone who wishes to understand A.A. history during the period following Bill Wilson’s death in 1971.

As a Ph.D. student at Harvard University in the 1970’s, he was the first researcher to be granted full access to the archives of Alcoholics Anonymous. The book that resulted,

Not-God: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous (1979), is still the classic work on early A.A. history.

His book on the spiritual life — Ernest Kurtz and Katherine Ketcham, The Spirituality of Imperfection: Modern Wisdom from Classic Stories (1992)

— is equally well known, and has also been an enduring best seller through the years since it appeared. His work on Shame & Guilt (orig. pub. 1981, rev. ed. 2007) has given a whole new depth to the discussion of those two vital recovery issues.

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