The Origin of the Sense of Boredom ~ Rupert Spira

In this video clip, Rupert discusses two sources for our desires and activities

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Wabi Sabi Love: The Ancient Art of Finding Perfect Love in Imperfect Relationships by Arielle Ford (Author)

Arielle Ford’s Wabi Sabi Love follows the success of her international bestseller The Soulmate Secret by revealing how to make love last forever.

Using the ancient Japanese idea of illuminating the beauty in imperfection (known as wabi sabi), Wabi Sabi Love provides all the tools necessary for you to experience more balance, harmony, and joy in your relationship than ever before.

No matter what stage of your relationship, Arielle Ford delivers the secret to lasting love. To quote Deepak Chopra: “Wabi Sabi Love weds ancient wisdom and modern concerns to create the formula for a sustainable, loving relationship for years to come.”

BROWSE HERE

Arielle Ford: Loving An Imperfect Partner Grows Your Soul

Published on Jul 15, 2014
Arielle Ford joins Barnet and Freeman for an important conversation. We are programmed by a society that projects images of perfection NO ONE can live up to. Arielle makes the point that in learning to love our imperfections and the beautiful imperfections of our partner, our soul grows. We become more human in the most gracious sense — a reflection of the divine — AND life just becomes a lot more fulfilling.

For more information about Arielle’s work, please visit: http://www.soulmatesecret.com/

The Secret of Truly Great Relationships – “Wabi Sabi Love”

Arielle Ford is a leading personality in the personal growth and contemporary spirituality movement. For the past 25 years she has been living, teaching, and promoting consciousness through all forms of media. She is a radio host, relationship expert, speaker, columnist and blogger for the Huffington Post. Arielle is a gifted writer and the author of eight books.

See incredible speakers like Arielle live at Awesomeness Fest.

Awesomeness Fest is a global non-profit, transformational event that brings together people who are driven to change the world– entrepreneurs, authors, technophiles, mavericks, artists and visionaries alike.

Like being at a festival that merges Burning Man, TED and an exotic vacation, you’ll get to dance the night (and day) away at incredible parties, go on breathtaking excursions, form life long friends and connections and learn how to take your life to the next level both personally and professionally. And it all happens in a paradise location.

Transcendental Meditation in America: How a New Age Movement Remade a Small Town in Iowa ~ Joseph Weber [updated Aug 4, 2014]

Pub Date Apr 1 2014

The Indian spiritual entrepreneur Maharishi Mahesh Yogi took the West by storm in the 1960s and ’70s, charming Baby Boomers fed up with war and social upheaval with his message of meditation and peace. Heeding his call, two thousand followers moved to tiny Fairfield, Iowa, to set up their own university on the campus of a failed denominational college. Soon, they started a school for prekindergarten through high school, allowing followers to immerse themselves in Transcendental Meditation from toddlerhood through PhDs.

Although Fairfield’s longtime residents were relieved to see that their new neighbors were clean-cut and respectably dressed—not the wild-haired, drug-using hippies they had feared—the newcomers nevertheless quickly began to remake the town. Stores selling exotic goods popped up, TM followers built odd-looking homes that modeled the guru’s rules for peace-inspiring architecture, and the new university knocked down a historic chapel, even as it erected massive golden-domed buildings for meditators. Some newcomers got elected—and others were defeated—when they ran for local and statewide offices. At times, thousands from across the globe visited the small town.

Yet Transcendental Meditation did not always achieve its aims of personal and social tranquility. Suicides and a murder unsettled the meditating community over the years, and some followers were fleeced by con men from their own ranks. Some battled a local farmer over land use and one another over doctrine. Notably, the world has not gotten more peaceful.

Today the guru is dead. His followers are graying, and few of their children are moving into leadership roles. The movement seems rudderless, its financial muscle withering, despite the efforts of high-profile supporters such as filmmaker David Lynch and media magnate Oprah Winfrey. Can TM reinvent itself? And what will be the future of Fairfield itself? By looking closely at the transformation of this small Iowa town, author Joseph Weber assesses the movement’s surprisingly potent effect on Western culture, sketches out its peculiar past, and explores its possible future.

Joseph Weber, the Jerry and Karla Huse Professor of News-Editorial and associate professor of journalism, worked in magazines and newspapers for 35 years. He spent most of that time, 22 years, reporting and writing for BusinessWeek, starting as a correspondent in Dallas and then running the magazine’s bureaus in Philadelphia, Toronto and Chicago. He took on the role of chief of correspondents for the organization in early 2006, serving until the summer of 2009.

Before BW, Weber reported and wrote for the Rocky Mountain News in Denver, Dun’s Business Month in New York City and The Home News in New Brunswick, N.J. He has a B.A. from Rutgers College and an M.S.J. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He has taught business and economic reporting, multimedia journalism, magazine writing, editorial writing and basic reporting.

During the fall 2011 semester, Weber taught at Tsinghua University in Beijing as a visiting professor in the Global Business Journalism program. He holds an Excellence in Financial Journalism Award from the New York State Society of CPAs, as well as two Peter Lisagor Awards from the Headline Club of Chicago, a Distinguished Editorial Achievement Award from McGraw-Hill, the Society of Corporate Compliance and Ethics Journalism Award and the Morton Margolin Prize from the University of Denver. He is also a 16-time marathoner.

His book, “Transcendental Meditation in America: How a New Age Movement Remade a Small Town in Iowa,” will be published in 2014 by the University of Iowa Press.

BROWSE HERE

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