Mindfulness Is Better Than Chocolate: A Practical Guide to Enhanced Focus and Lasting Happiness in a World of Distractions ~ David Michie

“This book is better than chocolate!”—Tal Ben-Shahar, New York Times best-selling author of Happier and Choose the Life You Want

Distractions are everywhere these days. Our thoughts drift to what we need to do tomorrow, or what went wrong yesterday. Even pleasurable things—like eating chocolate—don’t receive our full attention. We miss out on joy that is easily within reach!

In Mindfulness Is Better Than Chocolate, David Michie gives us the tools to rewire our brains for happiness. “Mindfulness” is paying attention to the present moment, deliberately and nonjudgmentally—and science has shown that those who practice it experience a wealth of benefits:Reduced stressStronger immune systemsMore ease in breaking bad habitsImproved self-esteemEnhanced mental claritySharper memoryOverall well-being. . . and better-tasting chocolate!As Michie explains, the way we see the world is our own creation. Drawing on both Buddhist teachings and contemporary science, he teaches us how to experience a mind free of stress and dullness. By harnessing the power of mindfulness and meditation, we can find everything we need to be fulfilled, productive, and content!


David Michie is the internationally best-selling author of a number of books about mindfulness, meditation and Buddhism. These include the non-fiction titles Why Mindfulness is Better than Chocolate, Hurry Up and Meditate and Buddhism for Busy People, as well as his popular novel series The Dalai Lama’s Cat. His books are available in 25 languages in over 30 different countries.

David has been delivering mindfulness and meditation seminars to a diverse range of audiences for the past five years. These include participating in ongoing programs under the auspices of the Australian Institute of Management – University of Western Australia Business School, Executive Education, as well as for a wide range of private, public and not-for-profit organisations including Bankwest, Ernst and Young, Woodside, Wesfarmers, Leading Edge Books, Heart Foundation, Cancer Support Association, Rotary, Medicare, Department of Health and the Tibetan Buddhist Society.

David has been a keynote speaker at a number of national conferences including the Happiness & Its Causes Conference in Sydney and Australian Meditation Conference in Melbourne. He has also been commissioned to contribute to a variety of major newspapers and magazines such as The Times of India – the world’s largest English language newspaper, The Daily Telegraph (UK), USA Today, The Australian and a very wide variety of other traditional and digital publications.

David’s blog on mindfulness and related subjects at http://www.davidmichie.com attracts a global audience of thousands of visitors each week. He has recorded guided meditations used in-flight by Air New Zealand, some of which are also available as free downloads from his website.

David welcomes reader contact through:

Website: http://www.davidmichie.com
Blog: http://www.davidmichie.com/blog

BROWSE HERE

David Michie on why mindfulness is better than chocolate at Happiness & Its Causes 2014

• Is mindfulness merely a tool for stress reduction or is there more to the practice?
• How can we use mindfulness to learn more about the nature of our own minds?
• Why does knowing more about your mind lead to a happier life?
• What is mind? What are its limits?
• How can I use my mindfulness practice to achieve its ultimate purpose?

David Michie, best-selling author and meditation coach, who launches his new book Why Mindfulness is Better than Chocolate at the conference; author of The Dalai Lama’s Cat, The Art of Purring and Buddhism for Busy People

Advertisements

Waking, Dreaming, Being :Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy ~ Evan Thompson [updated Dec 21, 2014]

Pub Date Nov 11 2014

A renowned philosopher of the mind, also known for his groundbreaking work on Buddhism and cognitive science, Evan Thompson combines the latest neuroscience research on sleep, dreaming, and meditation with Indian and Western philosophy of the mind, casting new light on the self and its relation to the brain.

Thompson shows how the self is a changing process, not a static thing. When we are awake we identify with our body, but if we let our mind wander or daydream, we project a mentally imagined self into the remembered past or anticipated future. As we fall asleep, the impression of being a bounded self distinct from the world dissolves, but the self reappears in the dream state. If we have a lucid dream, we no longer identify only with the self within the dream. Our sense of self now includes our dreaming self, the “I” as dreamer. Finally, as we meditate — either in the waking state or in a lucid dream — we can observe whatever images or thoughts arise and how we tend to identify with them as “me.” We can also experience sheer awareness itself, distinct from the changing contents that make up our image of the self.

Contemplative traditions say that we can learn to let go of the self, so that when we die we can witness the dissolution of the self with equanimity. Thompson weaves together neuroscience, philosophy, and personal narrative to depict these transformations, adding uncommon depth to life’s profound questions. Contemplative experience comes to illuminate scientific findings, and scientific evidence enriches the vast knowledge acquired by contemplatives.
Evan Thompson is professor of philosophy at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is the author of Mind in Life: Biology, Phenomenology, and the Sciences of Mind and Colour Vision: A Study in Cognitive Science and the Philosophy of Perception; coauthor of The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience; and co-editor of Self, No Self? Perspectives from Analytical, Phenomenological, and Indian Traditions and The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness.

Evan Thompson was born in 1962 in Ithaca, NY, and grew up in Boston, New York, and Toronto. After 8 years as a Professor in the Philosophy Department at the University of Toronto, he moved in July 2013 to the Philosophy Department at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. He writes about the mind, life, consciousness, and the self, from the perspectives of cognitive science, philosophy of mind, phenomenology, and cross-cultural philosophy (especially Buddhism and other Indian philosophical traditions). As a teenager, Evan was home-schooled in Southampton, NY and Manhattan at the Lindisfarne Association, an educational and contemplative community founded by his father, William Irwin Thompson. He received his A.B. in Asian Studies from Amherst College (1983), and his Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Toronto (1990).

Read an interview here

Evan Thompson – “Waking, Dreaming, Being” at CIIS

Dr. Evan Thompson is a professor of philosophy at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. He is currently the Numata Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies at UC Berkeley, where he is teaching a course on the dialogue between Buddhism, Phenomenology, and Cognitive Science. He is the author of numerous articles and several books, including The Embodied Mind (1991), Mind in Life (2007) and Waking, Dreaming, Being: New Light on the Self and Consciousness from Neuroscience, Meditation and Philosophy (forthcoming).

Beyond the two Birds


Published on Dec 21, 2014
Beyond the two birds is one that has no form, it has no species, it was never born, it cannot die. It’s not going somewhere, it’s not coming from anywhere.
Are we aware of this?

%d bloggers like this: