A Force for Good : The Dalai Lama’s Vision for Our World ~ Daniel Goleman

Publication date: 6/23/2015

For decades, the Dalai Lama has travelled the world, meeting with people from a wealth of countries who differ greatly in their background, social status and viewpoint, bringing them his own individual wisdom and compassion. In his encounters with everyone from the inhabitants of shantytowns in S o Paulo and Soweto to heads of state in Davos and Washington D.C., the Dalai Lama saw similar problems: a set of values that have helped the very rich to advance beyond the multitudinous poor, a disregard for the environment that could lead to global catastrophe and governments in paralysis, bereft of positive, progressive policies of any sort.

Now, as he turns eighty, having built up a profound knowledge of the world we live in today, as well as a penetrating grasp of its scientific context, the Dalai Lama gives us his vision for a better future. Challenging what he sees as a general mixture of cynicism and self-interest, he offers a radically different perspective and a vision that can be assimilated by people around the globe.

From cultivating early on a capacity for caring that transcends religious, ideological and national boundaries, to creating an economic system that applies principals of fairness and which values fulfilment, his argument focuses on what is urgent and why it should matter to each of us. In his unique manifesto, the Dalai Lama presents perspective on the world that can bring hope to millions, that will endure beyond the present day and that has the potential to reshape humanity as we know it.


Daniel Goleman, a former science journalist for the New York Times, is the author of many books, including the international bestseller Emotional Intelligence. He co-founded the Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning at the Yale University Child Studies Center (now at the University of Illinois at Chicago). He lives in Massachusetts. @DanielGolemanEI danielgoleman.info

The Dalai Lama’s 18 Rules For Living

At the start of the new millennium the Dalai Lama issued eighteen rules for living.

1. Take into account that great love and great achievements involve great risk.
2. When you lose, don’t lose the lesson.
3. Follow the three Rs: 1. Respect for self 2. Respect for others 3. Responsibility for all your actions.
4. Remember that not getting what you want is sometimes a wonderful stroke of luck.
5. Learn the rules so you know how to break them properly.
6. Don’t let a little dispute injure a great friendship.
7. When you realize you’ve made a mistake, take immediate steps to correct it.
8. Spend some time alone every day.
9. Open your arms to change, but don’t let go of your values.
10. Remember that silence is sometimes the best answer.
11. Live a good, honourable life. Then when you get older and think back, you’ll be able to enjoy it a second time.
12. A loving atmosphere in your home is the foundation for your life.
13. In disagreements with loved ones, deal only with the current situation. Don’t bring up the past.
14. Share your knowledge. It’s a way to achieve immortality.
15. Be gentle with the earth.
16. Once a year, go someplace you’ve never been before.
17. Remember that the best relationship is one in which your love for each other exceeds your need for each other.
18. Judge your success by what you had to give up in order to get it.

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Non-Dual Conscious Realism ~ Neil Theise


We propose a generalized theory of “Non-Dual Conscious Realism” addressing the fundamental issue of consciousness. This theoretical framework posits the universing arising from an undifferentiated, non-dual field of pure conscious awareness. From within this universal consciousness emanate the complementary phenomena of Planck scale quantum vacuum and quantum foam, generating space and time, matter and energy.

Through successive, recursive, creative interactions, phenomena and entities at each level of scale self-organize into emergent phenomena and entities at each next higher scale, comprising the entire cosmos. These triadic principles of complementarity, recursion, and creative interactivity (wherein “sentience” is the special case of the biological) are reflected throughout all scales.

Though emergentist/materialist positions predominate in contemporary discourse regarding consciousness, the primacy of this non-dual conscious reality, which we emphasize is the deepest possible “panpsychist” perspective, is not contradicted by any known scientific phenomena. Also, unlike most emergentist positions, it is inclusive of the inextricable linkage between observer and observed, subject and object, decisively revealed by quantum mechanics.

Indeed, at all levels of scale above the quantum realm, quantum-like effects – such as uncertainty, complementarity, superposition, entanglement, non-locality – reflecting such interconnectivity are recognized. Corollaries of Non-Dual Conscious Realism include that:

materiality is not implicit in the universe, but is entirely a scale dependent phenomenon; the “hard problem” of qualia is subsumed by confirmation that all phenomena of the universe are qualia within consciousness; neural correlates of consciousness are not how consciousness is created, but are, rather, the ways in which the nervous systems (human or other) transduce consciousness into adaptive, species-specific perceptions and behaviors. Individual consciousness and associated qualia are part of the universal, non-dual conscious reality.

Neil Theise, MD
Professor of Pathology and of Medicine at Icahn School of Medicine, Mount Sinai
Neil Theise, MD is a practicing pathologist at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, where he is Professor of Pathology and of Medicine. He is considered a thought leader in fields of liver diseases, liver stem cells, and adult stem cell plasticity. In recent years, interests in complexity theory applications to biology have led to novel insights regarding stem cell biology, non-Western models of the body, science-spirituality dialogue, and consciousness studies. With Menas Kafatos he is formulating a panpsychist approach to the relationship between consciousness and the universe. He is a Senior Student at the Village Zendo in NYC.

The World’s Biggest Religion, Biggest Problems, and Three Images of Non-Duality ~ Brian McLaren

Published on Mar 20, 2015

The Christian religion will play a significant role – for better or worse – in relation to global challenges of the 21st Century. While some forms of the religion continue to harden into dualistic thinking, three images central to Christian theology can serve as portals into non-dual thinking.

Brian D. McLaren is an author, speaker, activist, and networker among innovative Christian leaders. His dozen-plus books include A New Kind of Christianity, A Generous Orthodoxy, Naked Spirituality, and Why Did Jesus, Moses, the Buddha, and Mohammed Cross the Road? He and his wife, Grace, live in Florida and have four adult children and four grandchildren. He’s an avid wildlife and outdoors enthusiast. He has been profiled in Christian Century, Christianity Today, The Washington Post, and many other print media, and Time listed him among twenty-five influential Christian leaders in America. His upcoming book is We Make the Road by Walking.

 

Eroding Old Patterns of Feeling and Perceiving ~ Rupert Spira

A response to a question as to how to maintain the feeling of non-separation with the world.

 

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