The Yoga of Relationships: A Practical Guide for Loving Yourself and Others by Yogi Amrit Desai (Author)


Life itself is an experience of relationships. You must start your journey from you are, not from where you want to be. Relationships are a progressive unfolding of the Spirit. As the adage goes, you never step in the same river twice. Thus you never experience your relationship in the same way from day to day. It is never complete. If it stalls or fails to grow, its full potential is never met. Love with attachments confines you. Love without attachments makes you free. Yogi Amrit Desai is a world-renowned yoga master and teacher of holistic living, melding ancient wisdom with modern practicality. His piercing insight into the nature of relationships is a road map to fulfillment.

Yogi Amrit Desai is recognized as one of the pioneers of the authentic teachings of yoga in the West. Today he oversees the Amrit Yoga Institute in Salt Springs, Florida with its many affiliate branches and teachers in N. America and Europe. He travels extensively giving talks and workshops.

LOOK INSIDE

Solving Relationship Problems at the Source

An internationally recognized authority on yoga and holistic living, Gurudev (born Amrit Desai) began teaching yoga in 1960, making him one of the earliest pioneers of yoga in the West. The technique he developed has evolved from Kripalu Yoga into Amrit Yoga. Today, the approach to the inner dimension of yoga that he has developed is taught by more than 6,000 certified yoga teachers in more than 40 countries around the world.

Yogi Desai’s teachings contain a powerful experiential component of energetic transmission. It creates profound shifts for those who are ready, receptive and open. He has integrated ancient mystical wisdom of Tantra or Kundalini Yoga into practical methodology for dealing with the challenges of modern life.

Gurudev’s legacy is his work to restore the authentic practices of Patanjali’s classical Ashtanga or Eight-Limbed Yoga. The core teachings he created are built into what is called the Integrative Amrit Methods (I AM Techniques) through the in-depth practices of Yoga, Yoga Nidra and Quantum Breath Meditation.

Standing as Awareness Revised Edition by Greg Goode (Author)

Inspired by Sri Atmananda (Krishna Menon), the Direct Path is a “pathless path.” It simply articulates the being of you and the world as loving, open, clear awareness. If this truth is realized as your experience, then nothing need be done. The path disappears, and life is lived in sweetness and celebration! But if there are still questions or doubts, the Direct Path contains unique and powerful resources that stabilize this truth as your everyday reality. This is a revised edition of the book, expanded to add chapters on the Direct Path in addition to its selection of dialogs from a decade of “Nondual Dinner” gatherings. The first three chapters unfold the basics of the Direct Path, such as standing as awareness, being in love with awareness, and exploring awareness. Included are several experiments that help establish your everyday experience as awareness always and already. The dialogs cover questions such as the desire for enlightenment experiences, the relationship between the brain and awareness, the question of “nondually-correct” language, the belief in physical and mental objects, the idea of having a sage’s experience, and more.


Greg Goode is the author of highly regarded books in the contemplative spiritual field. He holds a doctorate in Philosophy from the University of Rochester. Greg grew up in multicultural Southern California. He lived in Panama for three years during his service with the U.S. Army, and lived in Germany for a year during graduate school. Greg currently lives in New York City with his wife May.

Look Inside

Progressive and Direct-Path Teachings – Greg Goode

Discusses how direct-path teachings differ from progressive-path teachings, and characterizes nondual realization as “seeing the cover come off” and recognizing what was underneath as having been present all along.Truth with non-dual teacher, Greg Goode

Greg Goode: The Fragrance of Sentience.

Greg Goode and Chris Hebard talk about, “The Fragrance of Sentience”.

Category
Education

A Spiritual Awakening ~ Francis Lucille

How did you discover your real nature?

You are asking about the specifics in my case. Before I give you the details, I have to forewarn you that this is not a one-size-fits-all path to the truth. The way to the discovery of our true nature varies from one seeker to another. It may be a sudden and dramatic experience or a subtle, seemingly gradual path. The touchstone, in all cases, is the peace and understanding that prevails at the end of the road.

Although a first glimpse of reality is an event of cosmic proportions, it may remain unnoticed at first and work its way in the background of the mind until the egoistic structure collapses, just as a building severely damaged by an earthquake remains stand- ing for some time and collapses a few months later, gradually or suddenly. This effect is due to the fact that the glimpse does not belong to the mind. The mind, which until now was the slave of the ego, becomes the servant and lover of the eternal splendor that illuminates thoughts and perceptions. As a slave of the ego, the mind was the warden of the jail of time, space and causation; as a servant of the highest intelligence and a lover of the supreme beauty, it becomes the instrument of our liberation.

The glimpse that ignited my interest for the truth occurred while I was reading a book by J. Krishnamurti. It was the point of departure of an intense quest that became the central and exclusive focus in my life. I read Krishnamurti’s books again and again, along with the main texts of Advaita Vedanta and Zen Buddhism. I made important changes in my life in order to live in accordance with my spiritual understanding. I renounced what many people would call an excellent career, because it implied my involvement as a scientist with the design and development of sophisticated weapons for the French military.

Two years after the first glimpse, I had achieved a good intellectual understanding of the non-dual perspective, although a few questions still remained unanswered. I knew from experience that any attempt to fulfill my desires was doomed to failure. It had become clear to me that I was consciousness, rather than my body or my mind. This knowledge was not a purely intellectual one, a mere concept, but seemed to somehow originate from experience, a particular kind of experience devoid of any objectivity. I had experienced, on several occasions, states in which perceptions were surrounded and permeated by bliss, light and silence. Physical objects seemed more remote from me, more unreal, as if reality had moved away from them and shifted toward that light and that silence which was at the center of the stage. Along with it came the feeling that everything was all right, just as it should be, and, as a matter of fact, just as it had always been. However, I still believed that awareness was subject to the same limitations as the mind, that it was of a personal, rather than universal, nature.

Sometimes, I had a foretaste of its limitlessness, usually while reading Ch’an or Advaita texts or while thinking deeply about the non-dual perspective. Due to my upbringing by materialistic and anti-religious parents and to my training in Mathematics and Physics, I was both reluctant to adopt any religious belief and suspicious of any non-logically or non-scientifically validated hypothesis. An unlimited, universal awareness seemed to me to be such a belief or hypothesis, but I was open to explore this possibility. The perfume of this limitlessness had, in fact, been the determining factor that sustained my search for the truth. Two years after the first glimpse, this possibility had taken a center stage position.

That is when the radical change, the “Copernican shift,” happened. This event, or, more precisely, this nonevent, stands alone, un-caused. The certainty that flows from it has an absolute strength, a strength independent from any event, object or person. It can only be compared to our immediate certainty to be conscious.

I was sitting in silence, meditating in my living room with two friends. It was too early to fix dinner, our next activity. Having nothing to do, expecting nothing, I was available. My mind was free of dynamism, my body relaxed and sensitive, although I could feel some discomfort in my back and in my neck.

After some time, one of my friends unexpectedly began to chant a traditional incantation in Sanskrit, the Gayatri Mantra. The sacred syllables entered mysteriously in resonance with my silent presence which seemed to become intensely alive. I felt a deep longing in me, but at the same time a resistance was preventing me from living the current situation to the fullest, from responding with all my being to this invitation from the now, and from merging with it. As the attraction toward the beauty heralded by the chant increased, so did the resistance, revealing itself as a growing fear that transformed into an intense terror.

At this point, I felt that my death was imminent, and that this horrendous event would surely be triggered by any further letting go on my behalf, by any further welcoming of that beauty. I had reached a crucial point in my life. As a result of my spiritual search, the world and its objects had lost their attraction. I didn’t really expect anything substantial from them. I was exclusively in love with the Absolute, and this love gave me the boldness to jump into the great void of death, to die for the sake of that beauty, now so close, that beauty which was calling me beyond the Sanskrit words.

As a result of this abandon, the intense terror which had been holding me instantaneously released its grip and changed into a flow of bodily sensations and thoughts which rapidly converged toward a single thought, the I-thought, just as the roots and the branches of a tree converge toward its single trunk. In an almost simultaneous apperception, the personal entity with which I was identifying revealed itself in its totality. I saw its superstructure, the thoughts originating from the I-concept and its infrastructure, the traces of my fears and desires at the physical level. Now the entire tree was contemplated by an impersonal eye, and both the superstructure of thoughts and the infrastructure of bodily sensations rapidly vanished, leaving the I-thought alone in the field of consciousness. For a few moments, the pure I-thought seemed to vacillate, just as the flame of an oil lamp running out of fuel, then vanished.

At that precise moment, the immortal background of Presence revealed itself in all its splendor.

Excerpt from Eternity Now, by Francis Lucille VIEW HERE

%d bloggers like this: