Our Minds are like Whirlpools in the River of Consciousness


Published on Oct 2, 2015

A discussion exploring the intersubjective agreement in relation to the perception of objects.

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Kitaro – Reimei (live)


Buy this album: http://www.domomusicgroup.com/kitaro/…
Buy at iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/koji…
http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/koji…

喜多郎 Kitaro – Reimei from Kojiki: A Story in Concert DVD

Kitaro is universally acknowledged as the founding architect of new age music. Kitaro’s various sound collaborations and resonant, multi-textured compositions truly defy the constraints of any genre. The Grammy and Golden Globe-winning artist has garnered global acclaim over a more than three decade long career with a signature sound and a pioneering fusion of cultures, techniques and spheres of consciousness that are truly his own.

Kojiki: A Story In Concert, Kitaro crafts this musical journey from the ancient chronicle (Kojiki) that recounts the birth of Japan and it’s people. The video captures an evening from his 1990 world tour that features music from the classic Kitaro album Kojiki (nominated for a Grammy in 1990). Kojiki: A Story In Concert is an intimate journey to inner realms as well as exotic earthly destinations. This is a tour de force for Kitaro and his ensemble offering all the drama, grace and humanity performed with a profound spirit in this musical adaptation of legends from traditional Japanese folklore. Concurrently, the audio from the concert will be available to online digital retailers as well as a digital video single.

The Spirituality of Age :A Seeker’s Guide to Growing Older By Robert L. Weber and Carol Orsborn

A compassionate guide for transforming aging into spiritual growth

• Engage with 25 key questions guiding you to mine previously untapped veins of inspiration and courage

• Find a constructive role for regret and fear and embrace the freedom to become more fully yourself

• Draw from both Eastern and Western spiritual traditions and the latest research in psychological and religious theory to cultivate your spiritual potential

As we enter the years beyond midlife, our quest for an approach to aging takes on added urgency and becomes even more relevant in our daily lives. Empowering a new generation of seekers to view aging as a spiritual path, authors Robert Weber and Carol Orsborn reveal that it is by engaging with the difficult questions about loss, meaning, and mortality–questions we can no longer put off or ignore–that we continue to grow. In fact, the realization of our full spiritual potential comes about not by avoiding the challenges aging brings our way but by working through them.

Addressing head-on how to make the transition from fears about aging into a fuller, richer appreciation of the next phase of our lives, the authors guide you through 25 key questions that can help you embrace the shadow side of aging as well as the spiritual opportunities inherent in growing older. Sharing their stories and wisdom to both teach and demonstrate what it means to feel energized about the possibilities of your later years, they explore how to find a constructive role for regret, shame, and guilt, realize your value to society, and embrace the freedom of your later years to become more fully yourself.

Coming from Catholic Jesuit and Jewish backgrounds respectively, as well as drawing from the latest research in psychological and religious theory, Weber and Orsborn provide their own conversational and candid answers to the 25 key questions, supporting their insightful and compassionate guidance with anecdotes, inspirational readings, and spiritual exercises. By engaging deeply with both the shadow and light sides of aging, our spirits not only learn to cope–but also to soar.

Robert L. Weber, Ph.D., is Assistant Professor of Psychology at Harvard Medical School and a former Jesuit. Recipient of the American Society on Aging’s 2014 Religion, Spirituality, and Aging Award, he is an advisory board member for the Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology’s Center for Psychotherapy and Spirituality. He lives with his wife in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

Carol Orsborn, Ph.D., is founder and editor-in-chief of Fierce with Age: The Digest of Boomer Wisdom, Inspiration, and Spirituality. The author of more than 20 books for and about the Boomer generation as well as popular blogs on Huffington Post, PBS’s NextAvenue.net, and BeliefNet.com, she has served on the faculties of Georgetown University, Loyola Marymount University, and Pepperdine University. She lives with her husband in Madison, Tennessee.

VIEW HERE

Spirituality of Age: A Conversation with the Co-authors

The Spirituality of Age: A Seeker’s Guide to Growing Older by Robert L. Weber, Ph.D and Carol Orsborn, Ph.D Pub date: Novenber 2015 by Bear & Company Publishing.


What is the Relationship Between Spirituality and Aging? | Carol Orsborne | Sixty and Me Show


How are spirituality and aging related? Spirituality is not just a tool for addressing the challenges of aging. It is a key to reaching our potential at any age. This is the view of Carol Orsborn, who has written 21 books and dedicated her life to helping boomers to find meaning and purpose in their lives. In our conversation, we explore how developing a spiritual perspective can help us on our path to reinvention after 60. If you have ever found yourself dwelling on an evolving sense of spirituality in your life and want to understand how to use that perspective in your everyday life, this interview is for you!

The Philosophy of Reincarnation and the Now Moment by Donna Quesada

Presence and Reincarnation; A Contradiction in Terms?

We talked in class, about the importance of presence, and the role of meditation in bringing us back to the only moment that has ever, and that will ever, exist—Now. And then a student asked a question:

“But Hindus believe in reincarnation—isn’t that a future-worry?”

At the heart of meditation, in Hinduism, and in all the Dharmic traditions, including Buddha Dharma and Sikh Dharma, is the importance placed on nurturing our power of focused awareness. It strengthens the mind’s ability to consciously choose, anew in each moment, where to focus its attention. As it happens, the best thing to focus on is now, and although there are countless reasons why, these are the three most important ones:

1. Now is it the most incredible and momentous event of our lives.

2. Now is the only time and place joy lives.

3. Now is the only time and place we can discover how the mind really works, and thus, get it to work better.

Now starts with the simple sensation of our own breath flowing in through our noses, and down into our lungs. Watching this is where presence begins and where true meditation begins.

I can appreciate my student’s concern about reincarnation, and the idea that if it happens at a future time, then thinking about it would seem to constitute future thinking—a direct contradiction to the enterprise of staying present.

However—and this is at the heart of my response—Just because you know the rest of the staircase is there, doesn’t mean you ever walk more than one step at a time!

The subtler nuances of my response concern the idea of reincarnation itself, which may be conceived of in myriad ways.

Ask a Zen Buddhist what she thinks of reincarnation and get one answer. Ask 10 others and get 10 more. Ask a Hindu, get another one still. Life and death happens every moment. It happens because you change every moment. In each and every moment, the forces of creation, preservation and destruction happen within you and without you, on every level of your physical, spiritual and mental existence. On the cellular level there is a war going on, and in the world of our minds, as meditation clearly shows us, we are forever duking it out.

But we only notice the aftermath and inevitable changes that follow, when something moves us and shakes us to such a degree that we’re thrown into shock—when we’re sure nothing will ever be the same again. We must remember though, that at any moment, we may proclaim with absolute certainty, that nothing will ever be the same again. We always notice only later, when, seen through the bittersweet palette of our mind’s eye, we gaze nostalgically back upon the events of our lives.

Reincarnation, conceived of in the most brute sense, as the soul taking up residence in a new physical vessel, after the complete physical death of the prior, is still just an extension of the way life is already—you know there’s a tomorrow, but you don’t live there. You know you’ll die, but you choose to live, while you’re alive.

In this unrefined interpretation of reincarnation, the soul’s rebirth is determined by the karmic balance left after our physical existence is done. But in the meantime, and in realtime, through meditation, we can redeem our innumerable debts. When we say we choose to live, we can really do it, by waking up now. The Hindus call it Moksha. We can all call it liberation.


Donna Quesada is an instructor of eastern philosophy at Santa Monica College and a dedicated teacher of Kundalini Yoga. Her spiritual name is Dhanpal Kaur. She is the author of Buddha in the Classroom; Zen Wisdom to Inspire Teachers and is a contributor to The Poetry of Yoga. She lives with her family in the heart of cinema land, Culver City, CA, where you’ll likely find her walking her nutty little terrier Marcel.

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