The Awakening Of Society Is Just As Important As The Awakening Of Our Self ~ By Phillip J. Watt

Spirituality is a very personal affair regardless of the various pathways or disciplines that one may follow. Yet even though there is an abundance of avenues for spiritual endeavor, there is generally a universal agreement on the principle of unity.

“If reality is unified, then we must also accept that everything is essentially equal.”

There are many ways that one may be introduced to this philosophy. We may have been brought up around it via our family. We might have had a profound revelation in a one-off experience. Some are initiated through ongoing paranormal activity. Others just intuitively feel it. Altered mind states could have been the catalyst. A gradual or instant revolution could have occurred in our mind where synchronicity deposed coincidence. There could have also been an influence by assorted texts and teachings which infer this similar conclusion. For most of us, uncovering the wisdom of unity most likely occurred via a combination of channels.

“Transcending the illusion of disconnection is a personal path.”

Regardless of our beliefs, and the series of events or informational resources that led to our personal awakening, our fundamental understanding is unity. We are each a part of a complex integrated whole, and our external environment is a reflection of our fundamental nature, including what is in harmony with us and what isn’t. So, irrespective of how peaceful we have set up our internal environment, if we truly want to experience peace, we need to transform the outer world – the collective mental and physical landscapes that we inhabit. If we are all truly unified, we have a responsibility as part of this awakening to continually heal and grow our internal and external worlds.

“The personal awakening is synonymous to the collective awakening.”

A Global Metaphysical View

Unity can be used as a universal term to describe the outcomes of various fields of thought. Examples include: Energy; Mind; Consciousness; Holographic universe; Light; Love; Spirit; the Source; the Field; the Akashic Field; the Zero-point Energy Field; Quantum Field of Possibilities; the Collective Unconscious; Undivided Wholeness; Nirvana; One; God etc. If these are all equal to each other in terms of their agreement that a unifying principle exists, then we have arrived at an agreed global metaphysical position which incorporates both our rational and intuitive hemispheres.

“The primary nature of reality is unified.”

Irrespective of what reality is literally made of, whether its essence is of a material or immaterial nature, it’s irrelevant to our goals. As long as we agree that a property of reality is unity, and that unity inherently implies that everything is fundamentally equal, then together we can get on with making this earthly experience fair and peaceful for all.

“Earth’s global culture needs to heal and grow as one.”

That is why an agreed metaphysical view for our global society has significant implications for our future. From both a personal and societal standpoint, as well as a rational and intuitive standpoint, we know to treat everyone and everything uniformly. The way we care for ourselves should be equivalent to the way that we care for others. Our philosophical and practical social systems should also ensure that each person has access to the resources they need to adequately survive and thrive.

“Because we are unified, the suffering of others is a reflection of our own suffering.”

No matter how far we may be personally removed from it, the reality is the majority of our fellow man is distressed from a lack of external and/or internal resources. The former is strongly influenced from an unequal distribution of food, water, shelter, infrastructure, education, medicine and political representation, whilst the latter from a lack of knowledge and skills in emotional regulation and psychological balancing, as well as a poor conceptual capacity to face and overcome the challenges to establishing and maintaining one’s inner peace.

“Suffering is pandemic across the so-called developing and developed nations.”

Translating a Global Metaphysical View Into Practice

When we individually undertake a process of spiritual introspection, we all arrive at the exact same place; unity. Yet when we translate that wisdom into practice, the result is a plethora of personal, philosophical and cultural differences. That is why so many distinct religions exist, especially because the expression of how we should operationalize this perspective is subject to the environmental influences present during its inception and development.

“There are infinite expressions of how to live in unity.”

Now that many people undertake this process outside the context of pre-established models, it is no wonder that there are so many individualized methodologies to spirituality. And there’s nothing wrong with that either; there is no one strict way to live, so as long as it doesn’t conflict with the primary principle of unity and its inherent implications, then it should be encouraged and embraced.

“Regardless of the personal path we choose to take, spirituality is a journey of enlightenment for both the inner and outer realms.”

The Health and Growth of The Self

We are all subject to the suffering of the self and it is our personal role to transcend it. But our health is much more than is usually defined; it’s not just our physical and mental well-being. The reality is we have many layers of our life to take care of including our physical, psychological, emotional, philosophical, sexual, behavioral, creative, social and spiritual vitalities. With this in mind, we should be continually asking ourselves what areas need more attention and what strategies can we implement to heal and grow. We also need to find a true love for ourselves.

“Therapeutic and developmental practices which harmonize all of our life vitalities ensures that we raise our vibration and align ourselves closer to our spiritual path.”

Even though we literally make the free choice on how we think, feel, act and live, we are still strongly influenced by our environment, such as parents, peers, culture, society, government and the age we live in. Therefore, as an adult we are both independent and conditioned agents. But we can transcend our conditioning and align ourselves to the fundamental wisdom and knowledge of the universe. Therefore, the time we become truly free is the time that we take full responsibility of ourselves and ensure that we, not anyone or anything else, are the most influential factor for how we evolve for the rest of our lives. That of course means taking full responsibility for how we think and feel.

“To be truly free, we must empower ourselves to guide our thoughts and emotions.”

It’s the basics. Excuses which blame something or someone for our thoughts and feelings just don’t cut it on the spiritual path. Spiritually, we have experiences for our growth; we are co-creators of our experience. Now this doesn’t mean that there aren’t consequences for the actions of others which hurt us, the response we provide is incorporated into the overall context of the negative and positive vibrations that they’ve attracted into their life.

“If people act unjust, then justice will inevitably be served.”

The new age mantra that “everything happens for a reason” may be true in the sense that experiences have innate information that we can capitalize on to progress us on our path of enlightenment, but it is equally true that proportional actions need to transpire in response. Just like we should respond to the injustice we serve ourselves, we should also respond to that which surrounds us. The tricky part is determining what that response should be which is why we draw on both our rational and intuitive capacities to guide us.

“Not only should we accept our experiences, but also respond to them accordingly.”

It is true that we make so-called ‘mistakes’ which deliver us to our destiny; however that doesn’t mean we should make that same choice again. We should learn from it. There are innumerable times that we have had an undesirable experience which resulted in our growth, regardless if it was influenced from the actions of ourselves or others. And that’s what we need; to learn, to heal, and to grow. We need to harmonious our energies and become our new, more developed selves in every moment. When we conceive of our experience this way – where our wants are the healthy and unhealthy desires of our ego and our needs are the experiences we require for sustained growth – then we always have something to offer ourselves.

“If we process each experience as an opportunity to learn, regardless of how undesirable that experience is, we always get exactly what we need: growth.”

Every moment is therefore an opportunity to progress our health and well-being. When we treat ourselves and others disappointingly, we should process it in the context of our learning and then make amends. The same applies when somebody treats us poorly; when we are exposed to underdeveloped actions by others, we should embrace it as a part of us, as well as give a calculated response in return. After all, we have accepted that we are fundamentally united. For example, what information and energy can we embrace from it? Is there some action we can do to encourage the health and growth of both the internal and external worlds?

“When we embrace our experience, we must develop a healthy balance between awareness, acceptance and action.”

The Health and Growth of Society

Mindful living is an integral aspect of spirituality. Allowing ourselves and others to make poor choices without negative judgement or condemnation is vital. Our judgement should be reasonable and realistic and we should always radiate positive and loving vibrations too. We should understand ourselves as a pulsing and energetic vibration – an instrument of sound adding to the orchestra of reality which encompasses us. We should lead from our heart and consciously influence the collective vibration of our shared reality.

“Maximizing the impact we have as co-creators amplifies the awakening of our collective consciousness.”

This means being loving, patient, compassionate, empathetic and understanding. But as described above, it also means taking action to influence the health and growth of our society. It’s a misconception to think that just because everything is meant to be, that it will naturally balance itself out without our intervention.

“It is as much our responsibility to undertake appropriate responses to our outside world as it is to our inside world.”

Just like there are some justified ramifications within our social models of law and ethics, there are also measures that we must apply in response to our external environment. This does not necessarily mean that the law should be taken into one’s own hands, but more so that as an individual within a global culture, actions need to be taken to rectify the injustices of our world which violate the philosophical principle of unity.

“The earth and our species needs help to come back into balance.”

For example, our leading philosophical and pragmatic compasses are contributing to some major ecological, social and individual injustices – systems that need to be addressed through calculated measures. If we just sit back and allow it to continue, it will. That’s why collective action needs to balance these injustices out, so we need to decide how we will personally contribute to our shared goals.

“Caring for the external world really is as important as doing it for our own internal health and growth.”

There are many injustices that currently plague our planet. Some serious research via alternative media will uncover a robust reflection of these social dysfunctions and the potential solutions, as well as the social movements which aim to ensure that the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual vitality of every human being is cared for and developed in our future.

“It is a shared responsibility that we transform our world.”

It is by having a true sense of the healing and growth that is required for both the inside and outside of us which reflect a holistic approach to a spiritual awakening. Once we have that awareness, we should aim for acceptance of why and how it needs to change, as well as the application of strategies to facilitate the therapeutic and developmental process that we and our society so desperately need to work through.

“Together we must unite because together we are one.”


Phillip J. Watt
has served the community for over a decade fulfilling a myriad of roles. With a love for spreading empowering messages, he also writes for several websites dedicated to mindful, informed and adventurous living.

He is a columnist at Elephant Journal and a writer for Wake Up World, The Mind Unleashed and Expanded Consciousness. His articles have also appeared through the social media of Earth We Are 1, Collective Evolution, Conscious Life News, Waking Times, among many others.

This website is designed to capture his written work in the one place. To speak to Phil, please visit the contact page.

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The Enlightenment Process: A Guide to Embodied Spiritual Awakening (Revised and Expanded) by Judith Blackstone PhD (Author)

The Enlightenment Process describes the process of enlightenment as the gradual realization of our most subtle dimension of unified, all-pervasive consciousness. It also explains how we uncover our authentic selfhood and embodiment at the same time as we arrive at our spiritual oneness with other people, the world, and cosmos.

Using a set of simple but effective meditational and physical exercises for “subtle self” work, Judith Blackstone clearly and expertly indicates the way in which we can deepen our spiritual awareness, develop our capacity for contact with other people, and reconnect with the world. Her lifetime of experience in depth-psychology, bodywork, and Kundalini yoga gives this book a distinctive authority and clarity.

This revised and expanded version of The Enlightenment Process is an invaluable guide that will lead readers in navigating the confusing or conflicting teachings on enlightenment. It does this by giving a more comprehensive description of the enlightened state. Anyone who has already started on the spiritual path or has a background in psychotherapy will be able to appreciate The Enlightenment Process more fully as it is a significant contribution to our understanding of the more advanced stages of personal growth. Included in the book are 18 practical exercises that will assist readers on this path to self-awareness.


Judith Blackstone offers an integrated approach to psychological healing, embodiment and spiritual awakening through classes, workshops, private phone consultations and teacher training/certification programs in the Realization Process.

Judith’s new book Belonging Here View Here is now available from online and neighborhood bookstores and from the Books and CDs page of her website.

Look Inside

Judith Blackstone – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Judith Blackstone is a nonduality teacher, spiritual psychotherapist, and co-founder of Nonduality Institute. She developed the Realization Process, a method of embodied nondual realization and psychological and relational healing. In the Realization Process, the radical openness of nonduality is based on deep contact with the internal space of one’s body. In this way, we discover an authentic, quality-rich experience of our individual being at the same time as we transcend our individuality. We realize ourselves as unified consciousness, pervading everywhere. When two people have both realized nonduality, they experience mutual transparency: a single expanse of consciousness pervading them both as a unity. Judith teaches workshops and teacher certification trainings in the meditation, embodiment and spiritual psychotherapy aspects of the Realization Process. She is the author of Belonging Here The Realization Process: A Step-by-Step Guide to Embodied Spiritual Awakening An audio series of The Realization Process is available from Sounds True. The Intimate Life The Empathic Ground

For information on Judith’s teaching schedule, visit http://www.realizationcenter.com. To learn about Nonduality Institute, visit http://www.nondualityinstitute.org.

Interview recorded 10/4/2014

Visual Intelligence: How We Create What We See by Donald D. Hoffman (Author)

“Don Hoffman . . . combines a deep understanding of the logic of perception, a gift for explaining it with simple displays that anyone can-quite literally-see, and a refreshing sense of wonder at the miracle of it all.”–Steven Pinker, author of How the Mind Works

Cognitive scientist Donald Hoffman’s exploration of the extraordinary creative genius of the mind’s eye “has many virtues, of which sheer intellectual excitement is the foremost” (Nature). Hoffman explains that far from being a passive recorder of a preexisting world, the eye actively constructs every aspect of our visual experience. In an informal style replete with illustrations, Hoffman presents the compelling scientific evidence for vision’s constructive powers, unveiling a grammar of vision – a set of rules that govern our perception of line, color, form, depth, and motion.

Hoffman also describes the loss of these constructive powers in patients such as an artist who can no longer see or dream in color and a man who sees his father as an impostor. Finally, Hoffman explores the spinoffs of visual intelligence in the arts and technology, from film special effects to virtual reality. This is, in sum, “an outstanding example of creative popular science” (Publishers Weekly). 20 full-color and 130 black-and-white illustrations


Donald Hoffman is a cognitive scientist and author of more than 90 scientific papers and three books, including Visual Intelligence: How We Create What We See (W.W. Norton, 2000). He received his BA from UCLA in Quantitative Psychology and his Ph.D. from MIT in Computational Psychology. He joined the faculty of UC Irvine in 1983, where he is now a full professor in the departments of cognitive science, computer science and philosophy. He received a Distinguished Scientific Award of the American Psychological Association for early career research into visual perception, and the Troland Research Award of the US National Academy of Sciences for his research on the relationship of consciousness and the physical world, and the Rustum Roy Award of the Chopra Foundation.

Look Inside

Donald Hoffman- Sages and Scientists 2013

Topic: Consciousness and the Interface Theory of Perception

“What is the biological basis of consciousness?” This is the formulation of the mind-body problem recently proposed in the journal Science, and widely adopted in current scientific research. Great progress has been made in identifying neural correlates of consciousness, and mathematically characterizing some of their dynamical properties. But it remains a mystery how these neural correlates and their mathematical properties can be, cause, or give rise to conscious experiences. In this talk I suggest that this mystery is due, in part, to an incorrect understanding of the relationship between perception and the objective world. I show, using results from evolutionary game theory and genetic algorithms, that natural selection does not favor perceptions that faithfully depict the true state of the objective world, but rather favors species-specific “hacks” that simply allow organisms to survive and reproduce. Our perceptions are like user interfaces on computers, that allow us to use the computer while remaining ignorant of the complexity of its hardware and software. Spacetime is our desktop, and physical objects are simply icons on this desktop. I suggest that this interface theory of perception, together with a “conscious realist” model of consciousness, is a promising approach to solve the perennial problem of mind and body.

Speaker: Donald Hoffman is a cognitive scientist and author of more than 90 scientific papers and three books, including Visual Intelligence: How We Create What We See (W.W. Norton, 2000). He received his BA from UCLA in Quantitative Psychology and his Ph.D. from MIT in Computational Psychology. He joined the faculty of UC Irvine in 1983, where he is now a full professor in the departments of cognitive science, computer science and philosophy. He received the Distinguished Scientific Award of the American Psychological Association for early career research into visual perception, and the Troland Research Award of the US National Academy of Sciences for his research on the relationship of consciousness and the physical world. He was chosen by students at UC Irvine to receive a campus-wide teaching award, and to be included in Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers.

Hoffman studies visual perception, visual attention and consciousness using mathematical models, computer simulations, and psychological experiments. His empirical research has led to new insights into how we perceive objects, colors and motion. His theoretical research has led to a “user interface” theory of perception—which proposes that natural selection shapes our perceptions not to report truth but simply to guide adaptive behavior. It has also led to a “conscious realism” theory of consciousness—which proposes a formal model of consciousness and the mind-body problem that takes consciousness as fundamental.

Sages and Scientists Symposium 2013
The Chopra Foundation

Rays of the Absolute (the Legacy of Sri Nisargadatta Maharaj)


Published on Mar 27, 2015

In 2006 Stephen Wolinsky proposed the idea of traveling to India to film Nisargadatta Maharaj’s translators and disciples to explore the legacy Maharaj left behind in his hometown, Mumbai.

In 2007 Zaya and Maurizio Benazzo together with Stephen Wolinsky, Philip Safarik and Fred Good traveled to India to shoot this film.

The meeting with the old devotees was both illuminating as well as deeply touching.

Over the next seven and a half years, we all plugged away, going through mounds of material allowing this project to reach completion.

The film you are about to see cannot demonstrate the amount of work that went into this project….but let’s simply say that finally it is complete…

Nisargadatta did not leave an ashram; he did not leave any teachings nor successors. This movie is a homage to him; a look at his unintended legacy from people that have been inspired by him more then words can express.

This film contains interviews with four of the old Nisargadatta’s translators: Ramesh Balsekar, S.K. Mullarpattan, Mohan and Jayashri Gaitonde,plus some old indian devotees and trustees, the publishers of “I Am That” and a visit to the old room in which Maharaj was holding his meetings, his Guru Samadhi Shrine and the place in which some of Maharaj ashes are preserved.
In the footage are also presented exclusive photographs of Maharaji’s cremation ceremony.

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