A-U-M: Awakening to Reality by Dennis Waite (Author)


Gaudapada was one of the world’s greatest philosophers in seventh-century India. He invokes the mystical symbol ‘AUM’ (pronounced as ‘ohm’) pointing to the three states of consciousness (waking, dreaming and deep sleep) and the nature of reality itself. In the text on which this book is based, he writes that the waker, dreamer and deep-sleeper are like the roles that an actor plays at various times. All three states are the result of ignorance and error. Who we really are is the fourth aspect – the actor himself. If you see or feel a ‘thing’, then that ‘thing’ is not ‘real.’ So the waking world is no more real than the dream. ‘You’ have never been born. Nothing has ever been created. Causality is a myth. Discover your true nature to be Existence-Consciousness, without limitations, undivided and infinite, prior to time and space. Incredible? Read…and be convinced by the irrefutable logic of Gaudapada.


Dennis Waite has been a student of Advaita for over 25 years and maintains one of the most visited and respected websites on the subject. He lives in Bournemouth, England.

Look Inside

Book Extract

Waking World is Unreal
Dennis Waite

The World Appearance

Third objection to world being unreal

And this leads on to the third objection namely that, whereas the dream world is subjective, the waking world has objective reality. It is experienced as external to ourselves, whereas the dream takes place in our mind (K2.9 – 10). But this notion suffers from the same confusion as before. We only recognize that the dream world is ‘in our mind’ when we are awake; at the time of the dream, it is just as much ‘external’ as is the waking world when we are awake. We might as well say that the waking world is really non-existent since it disappears when we are in the dream or deep sleep states. At the time of the dream, I experience external objects and events in just the same manner. Their illogicality or even impossibility only becomes apparent on awakening.

Similarly, when we recognize that turIya is the reality, we will also realize that the waking world has no objectivity of its own but is just an appearance within Consciousness. The objective reality of the two worlds is entirely relative to the standpoint of the observer. In fact, they are both mithyA.

From a ‘detached’ point of view, both waking and dream are similar experiences. Within the dream, there are ‘others’ who validate my dream experience. I have conversations with them and I assume (as a dreamer) that they see the same external (dream) world as I do. It is only from the vantage point of having woken up that I am able to see that this world was internally generated and (no longer) has any objective existence.

Of course I feel that I am unable to take a position from outside of this waking world to look at the situation in a similar fashion. And so I call the waking world ‘real’ and the dream world ‘false’. But in fact I do take such a stand every time I go to sleep. In the dream, the waking world is negated and in deep-sleep, both waking and dream are negated.

If we imagine a dream A in which we go to sleep and have a dream B. When we ‘wake up’ (from dream B into the dream A), we will say that the dreamt dream was ‘only a dream in the mind’, and that we are now (in dream A) in the real world. Of course, when we ‘really’ wake up into the waking world, we realize that both A and B were dreams and think that we are now in reality. Except that we are now effectively in dream C!

So long as we continue to believe in the objective reality of a separate world, we have not really woken up! The bottom line, with respect to this third objection, is that the experience of an external world does not mean that the world is real. Of course, we assume that it does, but an assumption is no proof at all.

If objects of both waking and dream worlds are unreal, that must include the people who inhabit them also, including the waker and the dreamer! If this is the case, it is denying the reality of the knower as well as the known. But this makes no sense as there has to be someone who is doing the denying! So who is it who sees or imagines these two worlds (K.2.11)?

This question highlights the danger of choosing the wrong word. Gaudapada actually uses the word vaitathya for the word translated here as ‘unreal’ but this should be regarded as a synonym for mithyA. The objects of the world are not unreal. Try walking in front of an oncoming car to demonstrate this! The objects (of both states) have reality relative to that state. What they do not have is absolute reality. Their reality depends upon I, the observer. That is I, the ultimate observer – Consciousness – not I, the separate person, which is equally mithyA. I, the waking person, cannot have absolute reality because I disappear, to be replaced by the dreamer or sleeper, when I go to sleep. I, the ego, also has only relative reality.

Gaudapada provides a preliminary answer to this question of who sees the worlds in K2.12, and introduces the concept of mAyA, which was mentioned in the introduction. He says that the scriptures tell us that it is the non-dual Self that ‘imagines’ itself and cognizes objects, by the power of its own mAyA. There is only the non-dual Self, or Consciousness. But he is suggesting here that this Self effectively creates a world, together with conscious beings to inhabit it, out of Itself. And, looking out at the world through the eyes of these beings, this Self ‘forgets’ that it is everything.

In fact, the ‘knower’ is not the original Consciousness but Consciousness ‘reflected’ in the mind of the observer. And we should never forget that all of this is really mithyA, like the snake misperceived in the rope.

It does, indeed, sound fantastical. And yet this is precisely what happens when I the waker go to sleep and dream! Whilst dreaming, I fully believe that I am in a complex, fully populated world of others; and yet everything is produced in my own mind, by itself, out of itself. The apparent plurality is self-delusion. Relatively speaking the waking world is no different. None of it has independent, substantial reality; it is all only name and form of myself, turIya.

Who-I-really-am is not the waker, which is Consciousness identified with this material body and believing in a separate gross universe. Both body and world effectively disappear when I go to sleep. And I am not the dreamer, which is Consciousness identified with the mentally created subtle body and dream world. These creations disappear when I wake up or go into deep sleep. The reality is that I am the Consciousness which is doing the identifying; that which is present throughout all of the three states and which does not change.

When I enter the dream, I (now the dreamer I) forget all about the waker I, believing that I am now completely awake in this mentally created dream world. And when I enter deep sleep, I forget both. All these experiences come and go but I, as Consciousness, remain unchanging as that in which they all arrive and depart. They are transient and their reality is relevant only to the ‘I’ which temporarily rules in that particular state. I, as Consciousness, am the only absolute reality. Recall again the metaphor of the actor playing several roles.

Carl Jung: The Wounded Healer of the Soul ~ Claire Dunne [updated Oct 28, 2015]

“Carl Jung: Wounded Healer of the Soul” is a spiritual biography of one of the most important figures of the twentieth century, a man whose ideas revolutionized modern psychology. Through over 150 full-color and black and white illustrations, including rare photographs and never-before-seen artwork by Jung himself, his life and work comes vividly to life.

By combining Jung’s voice with the impressions of his contemporaries, author Claire Dunne gives the reader a multi-dimensional view of this complex genius. A book that will deepen and expand the understanding of both novice and expert. “Claire Dunne’s sensitivity of feeling for her subject allows us to meet Jung in all his diverse complexity — his contradictions and paradox, human failings and strength, his greatness and creativity. We meet a man at once transparent to transcendence but also earthy, practical, a craftsman of wood and stone as well as souls.” — From the introduction by Jean Houston.

This beautifully illustrated biography tells the story of one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century. Carl Jung continues to be revered today as a true revolutionary who changed our views of psychology, introduced the West to Eastern spirituality and brought into general awareness such important concepts as archetypes, the collective unconscious and synchronicity.

In this book lecturer, author and broadcaster Claire Dunne chronicles Jung’s journey of self-discovery from his childhood, filled with visions both terrifying and profound, through to his early adulthood when he pursued more material goals, to his rediscovery of spirituality at mid-life. Special attention is paid to the tumultuous relationship between Jung and his one-time mentor Sigmund Freud, the unconventional yet vital role performed by his student Toni Wolff, and the revelatory visions Jung experienced following a close brush with death.

The words of Jung himself and those who shared his work and private life are presented verbatim, interspersed with Claire Dunne’s lively and accessible commentary and an evocative array of illustrations including photos of Jung, his associates and the environments in which he lived and worked, as well as art images both ancient and contemporary that reflect Jung’s teachings. Jung emerges as a healer whose skills arose from having first attended to the wounds in his own soul. This is an essential book for everyone interested in psychology, spirituality and personal development.

Claire Dunne is an author, broadcaster and producer who has lectured around the world on Carl Jung and many other subjects. Born in Ireland and a resident of Australia for many years, she founded two Australian multicultural radio stations and was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia for her contributions to multicultural education and broadcasting.
Claire Dunne: Carl Jung–Wounded Healer of the Soul

Claire Dunne is an author, broadcaster and producer who has lectured around the world on Carl Jung and many other subjects. Her diverse career in radio, television and film ranges from documentaries on Sigmund Freud to the history of the harp. Born in Ireland and resident in Sydney for many years, she was awarded an OAM honour by the Australian Government for her work in multiculturalism, Celtic culture and ethnic broadcasting.

Claire Dunne’s acclaimed illustrated biography “Carl Jung: Wounded Healer of the Soul” was nominated for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and is being translated into a number of languages. Originally published in 2000 to great acclaim, this new edition has a specially written introduction from the author and a foreword by Olivier Bernier, Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

Claire Dunne reads from ‘Carl Jung: Wounded Healer of the Soul’

Connecting with Coincidence :The New Science for Using Synchronicity and Serendipity in Your Life by Bernard Beitman

We’ve all experienced or heard of surprising events and unexplainable coincidences—money that seems to come from nowhere, a spontaneous idea that turns into a life-changing solution, meeting our soulmate on a flight we weren’t supposed to take, or families being reunited by “accident” after years of separation.

Often these coincidences are explained as being controlled by a higher power or pure chance. But for the first time since Carl Jung’s work, comes bold new research that explains scientifically how we can identify, understand, and perhaps even control the frequency of coincidences in our everyday lives.

Bernard Beitman, a leading expert on Coincidence Studies, proposes a greater personal responsibility which depends partly upon newly discovered “grid cells” located in the brain, near the hippocampus. But neuroscience cannot complete the entire puzzle, and in this fascinating guide, Beitman provides the missing piece. From analyzing true stories of synchronicity from around the globe and throughout history, he shares key personality characteristics and situational factors that contribute to the occurrence of meaningful coincidences in our lives. Where other books on coincidences tend to be theoretical, inspirational, or story collections only, Beitman’s book is the first to provide a scientific understanding and practical ways in which readers can use them in their own lives. He reveals:

  • How to activate your observing self so you don’t miss synchronistic moments
  • How serendipity can offer insights into solving problems or making difficult decisions
  • Why stress activates meaningful coincidences
  • Which states of mind impede our ability to experience synchronicity
  • How to interpret the meaning of a coincidence
  • Why being attuned to coincidences is a learned skill―and how to hone your sensitivity.


Dr. Bernard Beitman is the first psychiatrist since Carl Jung to attempt to systematize the study of coincidences. He is a Visiting Professor at the University of Virginia and former Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He attended Yale Medical School and completed a psychiatric residency at Stanford. Dr. Beitman has received two national awards for his psychotherapy training program and is internationally known for his research into the relationship between chest pain and panic disorder. In addition, he has edited two issues of Psychiatric Annals that focus on coincidences. Dr. Beitman is the founder of Coincidence Studies. His work with coincidences was the subject of a feature story in Men’s Health. Visit his blog at: http://www.coincider.com.

Contents:

Connecting With Coincidence Introduction
Chapter 1: Closer than Close
Chapter 2: Finding Romance
Chapter 3: Family Ties
Chapter 4: Friends, Colleagues, and Acquaintances
Chapter 5: Health Solutions
Chapter 6: Ideas in the Air
Chapter 7: Timely Money
Chapter 8: Jobs, Work, and “Luck”
Chapter 9: Spirituality and the Full Circle Experience
Chapter 10: How to Use Coincidence
Notes
Appendix 1: A New Theory of Coincidence
Appendix 2: Weird Coincidence Survey
Index

What Is Synchronicity: Where’s Snapper?

http://www.whatissynchronicitythemovie.com This film clip, about an unexpected childhood gift, is from an interview with Bernard D. Beitman, M.D., former chair, Department of Psychiatry, University of Missouri-Columbia. He is a cast member of the upcoming feature documentary, “What Is Synchronicity?” Beitman is an award-winning psychotherapy teacher, and developer of the Weird Coincidence Scale (WCS-2), a measure of coincidence sensitivity. Using the WCS-2, he has defined some of the personality characteristics of coincidence-sensitive people.

Ancient Wisdom in Modern Times – Deepak Chopra and Sadhguru

Ancient Wisdom in Modern Times – Deepak Chopra and Sadhguru, moderated by Ms. Chandrika Tandon

Published on Oct 21, 2015

Discussion between Deepak Chopra and Sadhguru about Ancient wisdom in modern times in Bharath Vidhya Bhavan, New York, moderated by Chandrika Tandon.

Dissolving Inner Division – Amoda Maa


Published on Oct 27, 2015

Satsang with Amoda Maa, held at the Heart Space Sunday Service in San Jose, California, with Music by Kavi & Travis – October 2015

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