Unwitting Mystic: Evolution of The Message of Love by Mary Reed (Author)


Unwitting Mystic: Evolution of The Message of Love is a rare journey from Washington, DC to India and into otherworldly Divine realms in the company of God, Jesus, Buddha and a woman with no previous interest in, or understanding of, spiritual teachings. Through intimate details of profound metaphysical events and a miraculous recovery following a serious suicide attempt, this transcendent story goes beyond the borders of conflict-driven human experience to offer hope in the promise that the ever-increasing willingness to resurrecting one’s own divinity is resurrecting a new love-driven consciousness throughout the world.

Mary’s Story

Mary Reed tells the story behind her book Unwitting Mystic: Evolution of The Message of Love. Video courtesy of Bob Bellairs.

Mary Reed – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Mary Reed is an “accidental” mystic who, following eleven years of profound, involuntary visions and insights into divine realms, surrendered her executive life in Washington, DC to explore her spiritual gifts in a remote Buddhist nunnery in India. She grew up without any interest in religion but with an innate knowing that humans had more ability to access greater wisdom than most seemed to realize.

She is originally from the U.S. Southwest but spent most of her career directing global healthcare programs and creating nonprofit partnerships throughout America and Africa. Today she divides her time between Thosamling Nunnery in India, where she is often immersed in silence; Cambodia, where she works with Wide Open Wings (a small charity she co-founded); and traveling to speak with a variety of audiences to share her story as a way to illuminate the common ground of Love and precious Divinity in all of us, and to inspire joyful collective resurrection and remembrance with her unique view of our beautifully awakening world.

Website: http://unwittingmystic.com

Book: Unwitting Mystic: Evolution of The Message of Love

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Seeking Jordan: How I Learned the Truth about Death and the Invisible Universe by Matthew McKay Ph.D. (Author), Ralph Metzner PhD (Foreword)

If you have lost someone you deeply love, or have become strongly aware of your mortality, it’s hard to avoid wondering about life after death, the existence of God, notions of heaven and hell, and why we are here in the first place. The murder of Matthew McKay’s son, Jordan, sent him on a journey in search of ways to communicate with his son despite fears and uncertainty. Here he recounts his efforts — including past-life and between-lives hypnotic regressions, a technique called induced after-death communication, channeled writing, and more.

McKay, a psychologist and researcher, ultimately learned how to reach his son. In this book he provides extraordinary revelations — direct from Jordan — about the soul’s life after death, how karma works, why we incarnate, why there is so much pain in the world, the single force that connects us, and our future as souls. Unlike many books about after-death communication, near-death experiences, and past-life memories, this is a book for those who do not believe yet yearn to know what happens after death. In addition to being riveting reading, Seeking Jordan is a unique heart-, soul-, and mind-stirring reflection on the issues each of us will ultimately face.

Matthew McKay is a clinical psychologist and a professor at the Wright Institute in Berkeley, California. He cofounded Haight Ashbury Psychological Services in San Francisco in 1979 and served as its clinical director for twenty-five years. Currently he serves as the director of the Berkeley Cognitive Behavior Therapy Clinic. Books he has coauthored on professional and self-help psychology have sold more than 3 million copies.

LOOK INSIDE

Why are We Here? – Matthew McKay, PhD author of SEEKING JORDAN

Published on Mar 7, 2016

SEEKING JORDAN author Matthew McKay, PhD shares powerful insights he gained about the purpose of life through channeled writing sessions with his son Jordan who was murdered in San Francisco in 2008. For more info visit http://www.seekingjordan.com.

Ram Dass: We Are Awareness


Shot at his home in Maui in 2005 (8 years after a stroke left him with a number of health issues), Ram Dass talks about how we first see ourselves as separate from each other but eventually we realize we’re not separate. In fact, we’re all the same awareness.

Tara Brach: A Gesture Of Kindness


The next time you find yourself in a bad mood, take a moment to pause and ask yourself, “What is my attitude toward myself right now? Am I relating to myself with judgment … or with mindfulness, warmth, and respect?”

Typically, you’ll find that when you’re anxious, lonely, or depressed, you’re also down on yourself in some way, and that undercurrent of feeling deficient or unworthy is what’s keeping you cut off from your own aliveness, as well as your feeling of connection with others.

The way of healing and homecoming begins with what I call “a gesture of kindness.” You might for instance put your hand on your heart—letting the touch be tender—and send a message inwardly. It might be “It’s okay, sweetheart.” Or “I care about this suffering.” Or, “I’m sorry and I love you.” Often, it’s simply, “This, too.”

Sometimes, this gesture of kindness includes saying “yes” to whatever’s going on—the yes meaning, “This is what’s happening, it’s how life is right now … it’s okay.”

If you’re really down on yourself, you can also say “Forgiven, forgiven.” Not because there’s something wrong to forgive, but because there’s some judgment to let go of.

As you offer yourself this gesture of kindness, take some moments to stay with yourself, to keep yourself company. Allow whatever most wants attention to surface, and sense that you are the loving presence that can include and embrace whatever’s arising.

Then, see if you can widen your attention, and notice what or who else is floating in your heart space. Perhaps you’ll intentionally offer a gesture of kindness to a friend who’s struggling with disappointment, a family member dealing with illness, or a teen caught in self-doubt.

As you continue to practice offering yourself and others this gesture of kindness, you will discover that this response to life becomes increasingly spontaneous and natural. In time, you’ll recognize it as the most authentic expression of who you are.

—Tara Brach, Labor Day Weekend, 2013

Tara Talks: Dedicating to Kindness

The Dalai Lama often says, “My religion is kindness.” In these few words, Tara reflects on the power of committing ourselves simply to cultivating a kind heart.
Enjoy this short talk on Dedicating to Kindness

Secular Meditation: 32 Practices for Cultivating Inner Peace, Compassion, and Joy — A Guide from the Humanist Community at Harvard by Rick Heller (Author), Greg Epstein (Foreword)

Meditation is a form of mental exercise with numerous scientifically verified physical and psychological benefits. As meditation teacher Rick Heller shows, meditation’s benefits extend beyond the personal to enrich relationships with others, with one’s community, and with the world. In Secular Meditation, step-by-step instructions, personal stories, and provocative questions teach empathy for others, stress reduction, and the kind of in-the-moment living that fosters appreciation for life and resilience in the face of adversity. Heller simplifies what is often found mysterious, describing and providing detailed instructions for 32 different practices, ensuring that anyone can find the right one.

Heller simplifies what is often found mysterious — “If you have ever loved or even liked another person, you have the prerequisites for learning kindness meditation” — and invites all to partake in “awe and wonder at the rich experience of being alive.”


Freelance journalist and meditation instructor Rick Heller has reported for the Lowell Sun and other New England newspapers and has been published in Buddhadharma, UUWorld, Tikkun, Free Inquiry, Faith Street, The Humanist, and Boston magazines. He has contributed short stories to Fantasy and Science Fiction.

Rick is the facilitator of the Humanist Mindfulness Group and has led meditations sponsored by the Humanist Community at Harvard since 2009. He has also attended workshops and retreats at the Cambridge Insight Meditation Center, the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies, and the Insight Meditation Society.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from MIT, a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard University, and a master’s degree in journalism from Boston University.

LOOK INSIDE

Secular Meditation – Cultivate Inner Peace, Compassion, & Joy

Published on Mar 7, 2016

Author Rick Heller talks about SECULAR MEDITATION: 32 Practices for Cultivating Inner Peace, Compassion, and Joy. For more info visit http://bit.ly/1LkusgR.

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