His Holiness the Dalai Lama provides intimate details on an advanced meditation practice called Dzogchen using a visionary poem by the 19th-century saint Patrul Rinpoche, author of the Buddhist classic Words of My Perfect Teacher.

The Dalai Lama deftly connects how training the mind in compassion for other beings is directly related to—and in fact a prerequisite for—the very pinnacle of Buddhist meditation. He presents his understanding, confirmed again and again over millennia, that the cultivation of both compassion and wisdom is absolutely critical to progress in meditation and goes into great depth on how this can be accomplished.

While accessible to a beginner, he leads the reader in very fine detail on how to identify innermost awareness—who we really are—how to maintain contact with this awareness, and how to release oneself from the endless stream of our thoughts to let this awareness, always present, become consistently apparent.

HIS HOLINESS THE FOURTEENTH DALAI LAMA
is considered the foremost Buddhist leader of our time. The exiled head of the Tibetan people, he is a Nobel Peace Laureate, a Congressional Gold Medal recipient, and a remarkable teacher and scholar who has authored over one hundred books. JEFFREY HOPKINS is Founder and President of the UMA Institute for Tibetan Studies. He is Professor Emeritus of Tibetan Buddhist Studies at the University of Virginia, where he taught Tibetan Buddhist Studies and Tibetan language for thirty-two years from 1973. He served as His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s chief interpreter into English on lecture tours for ten years, 1979-1989, and has translated and edited fifteen books from oral teachings by His Holiness the Dalai Lama. He has also published numerous translations of important Buddhist texts that represent the diversity of views found in Tibetan Buddhism.

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Dalai Lama Talk : Awareness of Peace, Mindfulness And Wellbeing

Dalai Lama Talk: Awareness of Peace, Mindfulness and Wellbeing

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama Emphasizes his belief that the entire concept of war is based on the “…us and them…” or “…we and they…” way of thinking.
The wars of the last century stem from a “…self-centered attitude…”

His holiness talks frankly about meeting world leaders and discussing the reasons and thinking behind nations going to war. When meeting a world leader for the first time”…not mentioning any names…” the first visit is very stand off-ish, the next time a little closer, the third visit they would talk. And his holiness suggested that this type of gap between people is a contributing factor in the reason nations engage in war.
With emphasis on George Bush and the Iraq – Afghanistan wars. He says he believed the presidents heart was in the right place but his method was wrong. Using force was wrong.

The Dalai Lama also speaks about overcoming tragedy by always trying to see things from different angels. He speaks of losing his country of Tibet and becoming a refugee and how that was “…most fortunate…” because he was able to leave behind a mostly ceremonial life in Tibet and travel, meet new people and speak all over the world. His Holiness say’s that the tragedy of losing Tibet, woke up the Tibetan people.

“..200,000,000 people killed, such immense violence and suffering and including the use of two nuclear bombs once Nagasaki once Hiroshima, I personally visited these areas … men use these things out of strong anger, hatred…” Now the next 100 years will not be free of problems, global warming, population explosion etc. but we have the opportunity for nations to approach these problems with “…peaceful means…” and “…non violence…”.

“…My body speech and mind I dedicate to the wellbeing of others…” – His Holiness the 14Th Dalai Lama.

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