Mantra Of Avalokiteshvara | Medicine Buddha Mantra

Mantra Of Avalokiteshvara | Medicine Buddha Mantra, Mantra Of Avalokiteshvara, Mantra of Avalokiteshvara Tibetan..
Mantra Of Avalokiteshvara Lyrics:
……………………………………………
Namo Ratna Trayaya,
Namo Arya Jnana
Sagara, Vairochana,
Byuhara Jara Tathagataya,
Arahate, Samyaksam Buddhaya,
Namo Sarwa Tathagate Bhyay,
Arhata Bhyah,
Samyaksam Buddhe Bhyah,
Namo Arya Avalokite
shoraya Bodhisattvaya,
Maha Sattvaya,
Maha Karunikaya,
Tadyata, Om Dara Dara,
Diri Diri, Duru Duru
Itte We, Itte Chale Chale,
Purachale Purachale,
Kusume Kusuma Wa Re,
Ili Milli, Chiti Jvalam, Apanaye Shoha.

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When Someone Pulls Your Trigger: How To Stop Reacting Defensively ~ By Shift

You’re rolling along with a smile on your face and joy in your heart and then BAM! Something hits you. Or should that be someone…?

Whether it’s in person, on the phone, via text, or even on Facebook, you never know when someone is about to pull your trigger. It might be what is said or it might be the way it is said, but a certain combination of words has turned your smile into a frown and your joy into anger.

Sound familiar?

The problem is that your reaction comes from within you and is founded upon your past experience, your world view, and your ego. So regardless of whether or not the other person was trying to hurt you, the pain you feel is in your hands.

Luckily, if the problem stems from within, then the solution also lies in you.

But before you can find that solution, you have to do something quite challenging – you have to be aware.

Awareness sounds easy, right? If that were true, the world would contain far less conflict and negative energy than it does.

In fact, the vast majority of us go through life with only the most fleeting glimpses of true awareness. We neglect to stop and reflect upon our thoughts, to see them objectively for what they are, and instead let the world – and the people in it – direct our emotions and control our minds and mouths.

The truth is, however, that when someone sets off your trigger, you have a choice – one that will determine the course of your life in one way or another. So, awareness is all about recognizing the choice in front of you and making it in the way that puts you most at peace.

Do you retreat into yourself and launch a counter-attack, or do you embrace the opportunity to express your feelings and seek reconciliation?

Luckily, there are some steps you can take whenever you feel a defensive reaction bubbling inside of you:

1. Pause for thought.

When you feel like you are being attacked, the immediate response is usually one of retaliation. Instead, just do nothing at first; reign in your desire to react and take a moment to compose yourself.

Whatever you then decide to do, it will not be driven from those initial, often irrational thoughts.

2. Step into their shoes.

The other person may have said something to cause you offense, but try and look at things from their perspective. See through their eyes and from their mind and search for the thoughts and emotions that have led them to say what they have said.

Not agreeing with someone doesn’t mean you can’t comprehend their reasoning, and instead of going on the counteroffensive and attacking them back, if you can go through their logic, you will be better placed to form a non-inflammatory response.

3. Observe your feelings.

Feelings and thoughts are often mistaken for one another or simply lumped together, but they are, in fact, completely distinct elements of your being.

You can be happy because you achieve something, because you are with loved ones, or simply because it is a beautiful day. The same feeling occurs, but coming from different sources.

Thus, whatever is going on in your head, try to look deeper and really feel the feelings inside. Let go of all the thoughts that might be clouding your mind and just sit and breathe for 10 seconds. By separating and releasing the narrative you’ve created, you are just left with the feelings, and you should find that these subside once they are no longer receiving energy from your thoughts.

4. Know that it’s them, not you.

Whatever has been said or done by the other person, remember that it came from them and because of their world view. They have experienced a completely different life to you and their behavior comes about because of their unique history.

This is not to say that you should absolve them of any responsibility – we are all responsible to life – but you can take comfort in the fact that their attack on you was born in their psyche and it does not have to find a home in yours.

Remember: it’s their issue, not yours.

5. Let the heart drive when responding.

In those circumstances where a response is called for – and bear in mind that sometimes no response is the right response – be sure to come at it from a place of love.

Your mind may create the words and action, but it should be driven by the heart. When you do this, it helps to disarm the other person and pacify the situation at hand.

If you want to receive love, you first have to give it; taking this approach at those times when you’d normally show anger is a sure-fire way to reach a place of peace within yourself.

A defensive reaction to any given situation is one that will rarely result the way you’d have liked. Instead, fight the urge to engage in conflict and use your awareness of yourself, the other person, and the choice at hand to take the most harmonious path available.

This article has been republished from A Conscious Rethink

Back to Sanity: The Power of Empathy; Healing Conflict through Connection by Steve Taylor


In the UK, there has been a lot of publicity lately for the idea of “restorative justice.”
As part of this process, offenders are brought face to face with the victims of their crimes, to hear how they have suffered as a result of them. The aim of restorative justice is healing, both for victim and offender. The victim transcends their rage with some understanding and forgiveness towards the offender, and the offender empathises with the victim, becoming aware of the real meaning of their crimes. This process changes lives. Victims feel free of the weight of hatred and are able to move on; offenders have a wider sense of perspective, and are less likely to re-offend. Sometimes offenders don’t meet their specific victims, but just the victims of similar crimes. But this still leads to a new awareness, and new patterns of behaviour.

For me, this highlights the enormous significance of empathy. To a large extent, all human brutality — all oppression, cruelty and most crime — is the result of a lack of empathy. It’s a lack of empathy which makes someone capable of attacking, robbing, raping or oppressing another human being. It’s a lack of empathy for another tribe or country which makes warfare and conflict possible. It’s a lack of empathy towards other ethnic groups, social classes or castes what makes oppression and inequality possible.

What is Empathy?

Empathy is the ability to “feel with” another person, to identify with them and sense what they’re experiencing. It’s sometimes seen as the ability to “read” other people’s emotions, or the ability to imagine what they’re feeling, by “putting yourself in their shoes.” In other words, empathy is seen as a cognitive ability, along the same lines as the ability to imagine future scenarios or to solve problems based on previous experience. But in my view, empathy is more than this. It’s the ability to make a psychic and emotional connection with another person, to actually enter into their mind-space. When we experience real empathy or compassion, in a sense, our identity actually merges with another person’s — your “self-boundary” melts away and the separateness between you and the other person fades.

Our strongly developed sense of individuality — being a personal self, or ego — can make it difficult for us to experience this state of connection. The ego walls us off from other people, particularly those belonging to other groups: the other gender (in the case of female oppression), other tribes, nations, races or classes. It encloses us in a narrow world of our own thoughts and desires, making us so self-absorbed that it’s difficult for us to experience the world from other people’s perspective. Other people become truly “other” to us. And this makes it possible for us to inflict suffering on them, simply because we can’t sense the pain we’re causing them. We can’t feel with them enough to sense their suffering.

On the other hand, if you identify with another person, if you have a psychic and emotional connection with them, then it’s impossible to treat them brutally. You recoil from their experience of suffering in the same way that you recoil from your own suffering. In fact, you feel a strong desire to relieve their suffering and aid their development. But if you can’t identify with them, then there’s no limit to the amount of suffering you can inflict. You can’t sense their pain, so there’s nothing to stop you causing it.

As Restorative Justice shows, empathy can be learned to some degree. When people are brought together in a neutral context, with an open, trusting attitude, empathy naturally establishes itself. Distinctions of ethnicity, religion and other superficial identity badges begin to fade away, as does the sense of grievance and rage derived from past events.

And it’s this bond which is surely our true nature. Empathy shows that the concept of separateness is an illusion. Empathy is simply the experience of our true connectedness, the exchange of feeling through the channel of shared consciousness which unites not just all human beings, but all living and non-living things. The wider empathy stretches from victims to offenders, from one ethnic group to another, from nation to nation and religion to religion, the less brutal and more harmonious the world will become.

Source: Super Consciousness

Adyashanti – Welcoming Transformation


Adyashanti explores the inherent unsatisfactoriness of life that is woven into the fabric of human existence, and how the fierceness and gracefulness of life are intertwined. Adyashanti points to how our egoic operating system is in a push-pull relationship with life, and points out that our ego can never be fully satisfied. When the trap of the ego harnesses your attention, by stopping for a moment, you are able to realize that you have a choice as to where you place your attention.

By tapping into a deep well of wisdom and by listening to something deeper than the reactive mind, the possibilities before you are endless. A new perspective opens up before you—to see suffering as a motivator to relieve suffering, rather than to run away from it. Suffering no longer has to carry a heavy weight over you—it can birth a transformation within you and lift you up into a non-suffering state of being.

Adyashanti explores the unlimited options available to you in any given situation and points out that the key is to deeply listen to something beyond the reactive mind. When you do this, a calmness settles into being. This provokes the question: What will your relationship with life be?

Excerpted from “Fierce Grace”:

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