Hoksila Lakota (Lakota John) – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Published on Jul 12, 2017

Hoksila Lakota, commonly known as John Lokota is a Native American whose heritage comes from Oklahoma and the Great Plains of North America. Many generations ago his people lived in harmony with all things Universal, “uni” meaning One and “verse” being Song. When a system came in that crippled the people, making them dependent, some stayed and accepted the system and some left seeking broader horizons.

Rejecting the life of poverty and struggle he was born into, as a young man Lakota John fully embraced the illusion of glamour, bright lights and the fast pace of a big city. Trading in his cultural identity and the ways of his ancestors – a way of prayer and Spirit – he was lured by the seductive power of the city’s underworld, chasing the counterfeit lifestyle of money and self gain.

After travelling down many dead end roads in a reckless disregard for life, the light finally dawned, and Lakota awakened to the prompting of Spirit and ancient ancestors calling him back to the Red Road of Sobriety. Finding his innocence, or inner sense, by working through his past, he began to walk the straight and narrow path that leads to the sacred Tree of Life and reunion with the Highest Good, God or Wakan Tanka.

The impact his own restoration had on his life moved him to reach out to others, and ever since he has been involved in the mental health sector and working with keepers of the sacred pathways and knowledge for over twenty years. Through the lifestyle he once lived he is able to recognize the unseen enemy that binds and captivates the soul of man and woman through separation, suppression and sedation. Using the time-tested spiritual wisdom of his ancestors he helps guide others back from the dark world that he himself used to live in; the world of illusion, delusion and separation.

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Eckhart tolle – Responsability for Wake Up

How Soon is Now: From Personal Initiation to Global Transformation by Daniel Pinchbeck (Author), Sting (Preface), Russell Brand (Introduction)

We are on the brink of an ecological mega-crisis, threatening the future of life on earth, and our actions over the next few years may well determine the destiny of our descendants. Between a manifesto and a tactical plan of action, How Soon is Now? by radical futurist and philosopher Daniel Pinchbeck, outlines a vision for a mass social movement that will address this crisis.

Drawing on extensive research, Daniel Pinchbeck presents a compelling argument for the need for change on a global basis. The central thesis is that humanity has unconsciously self-willed ecological catastrophe to bring about a transcendence of our current condition. We are facing an initiatory ordeal on a planetary scale. We can understand that this initiation is necessary for us to evolve from one state of being – our current level of consciousness – to the next. Overcoming outmoded ideologies, we will realize ourselves as one unified being, a planetary super-organism in a symbiotic relationship with the Earth’s ecology and the entire web of life.

Covering everything from energy and agriculture, to culture, politics, media and ideology, How Soon Is Now? is ultimately about the nature of the human soul and the future of our current world. Pinchbeck calls for an intentional redesign of our current systems, transforming unjust and elitist structures into participatory, democratic, and inclusive ones. His viewpoint integrates indigenous design principles and Eastern metaphysics with social ecology and radical political thought in a new synthesis.

Daniel Pinchbeck is the author of Breaking Open the Head (Broadway Books, 2002),2012: The Return of Quetzalcoatl (Tarcher/Penguin, 2006), and Notes from the Edge Times(Tarcher/Penguin, 2010). He is the founder of the think tank, Center for Planetary Culture which produced the Regenerative Society Wiki and his essays and articles have been featured in The New York Times Magazine, Esquire, Rolling Stone, ArtForum, The New York Times Book Review, The Village Voice, Dazed and Confused and many other publications. In 2007, Daniel launched the web magazine Reality Sandwich and co-founded Evolver.net. Evolver currently includes Evolver Learning Labs, a webinar platform, and The Evolver Network, our nonprofit initiative. Daniel also edited the publishing imprint, Evolver Editions with North Atlantic Books. He also featured in the 2010 documentary, 2012: Time for Change directed by Joao Amorim and produced by Mangusta Films.


Are we going through a Planetary Initiation? Daniel Pinchbeck asks if the global ecological crisis is actually an opportunity.

Watch the full film here: http://bit.ly/2t48zxJ

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