Death of the Ego ~ Humanity Healing

Freedom from dependence on external conditions ~ Eckhart Tolle

Published on Oct 2, 2017

In this video, Eckhart Tolle says that it’s possible to be free from dependence on external situations!
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The Pinnacle of Nondual Understanding: Rupert Spira

Published on Oct 2, 2017

In a welcome return to the time-honored practice of teachers commenting on the sacred texts of the past, Rupert Spira weaves a masterful commentary between the lines of the little-known book Know Yourself by the 13th century Sufi Awhad al-din Balyani. With the clarity and insight we have come to expect from Rupert, he gives us a foretaste of his book The Nature of Consciousness, and reminds us that, as is true of the misunderstandings of other world religions, the popular mythology is far removed from the realization of the founder of Islam, whose teaching was always the oneness of being.

How Higher Levels of Consciousness May Appear in Our Life

When we are asked what we find the most important thing in our life, the most of us would be able to answer the question.

We would, naturally, come up with different answers, but that is not the point; the point is that we are able to answer. But as long as we are able to answer, we remain detached from the higher levels of Consciousness. How is that possible?

The Nature of Higher Consciousness

If we wish to find out how that is possible, we must first examine the nature of higher Consciousness. A number of people have experienced those higher levels, and there are thousands of reports about that state of Consciousness.

Still, if we penetrate deep into that experience, we find that no higher levels of Consciousness exist, only Consciousness itself. That Consciousness has only two states that we are able to experience: one identified with various forms and shapes, and one that is free of forms and shapes.

The Consciousness Identified with the Forms and Shapes

What does this identification mean? It means that we identify with a form (e. g. our name) that originally did not belong to us (we are all born without a name), but through identification this specific form has become a part of our existence.

When the Consciousness identifies with a form, the Ego appears. The Ego always means some sort of an identification, self-determination (I am a man, I am a father, I am an Englishman, I am Christian etc.) The Ego therefore rests upon our identification with things that are important for us ego.

If I am able to answer the question, ”What is important for me?” I am in the state of identification with the forms and shapes.

This state of Consciousness is always restrictive and exclusive. Identification is always preceded by a process of selection: this thing – this form – is important for me, whereas that one is not.

We usually choose the forms and shapes that we find beautiful, good and valuable, since these are expected to make us beautiful, good and valuable people.

Selection always comes hand in hand with anxiety and fear that we may loose what is important for us and, together with those things, we may loose ourselves.

The process of identification does not stop just because we have become spiritual helpers. But now different things are becoming important for us, for instance the extended state of Consciousness or the experience of the astral projection.

At that state of Consciousness, we identify with these experiences, these are the factors that are important for us, they provide the identity of our spiritual Ego. Nothing has really changed, apart from the forms and shapes we identify with.

The Consciousness Free from Forms and Shapes

There moments in everybody’s life when our identification with the forms and shapes loosens a little bit for a short while, and in that instant we may experience an entirely different state of Consciousness.

When our identification with a form ceases, a new space is generated between us and the form and we are able to see and recognize that we are not identical with that form. With the dissolution of the identification, the Ego also disappears.

When we are in that state of Consciousness and we are asked what we find important in life, we are simply unable to answer the question, as everything that we formerly regarded as important vanished together with the Ego. Still, we sense that we are alive, and we did not disappear with the Ego.

What we then experience may perhaps be best termed as Being. There is only the pure existence, we are eyewitnesses, contemplating the dance of forms and shapes around us.

We do not identify with anything, we are a Consciousness free of the obligation to make choices. We are free and independent of the forms and shapes and of the necessity of choosing from them. All our suffering and problems have vanished, we are surrounded by peace and tranquility.

Awakening from the Stupor of Identifications

On most occasions, one is only able to experience that state of Consciousness free of identifications for very brief periods only. This is, however, one of the most wonderful and certainly one of the most important experiences in our life. It wakes us up, in fact shakes us out of the stupor of identifications.

Once we have had that experience, our alertness will increase, and we will pay more and more attention to the present moment. When we are alert and shift the center of our existence into the ”here and now,” our identification with the forms and shapes will further loosen.

Such moments may therefore appear more and more frequently in our life. As we are bound to the forms and shapes to a lesser and lesser degree, the periods and intensity of these experiences increases. In the end it will remain the only reality for us.

~From the book: Frank M. Wanderer: The Revolution of Consciousness: Deconditioning the Programmed Mind

http://www.frankmwanderer.com

Joan Borysenko, Ph.D. – Focus on Making Small Changes

Posted on October 2, 2017
When you try to change your entire life in a day, chances are slim unless you’re being taken into the Witness Protection Program.

And when you think about the effort that change takes, it can be paralyzing. But there’s a much gentler option. Let a story about my friend and colleague nurse-researcher Dr. Janet Quinn, author of I Am a Woman Finding My Voice, tell you more.

Once upon a time, Janet went to Australia to spend a week with a group of aboriginal elders. One day they piled into a van to search the arid outback for bush tucker (Australian for “food”). Items such as Witchety grubs and honey ants may seem unattractive to Westerners, but they’re delicacies in the outback.

The van was bouncing along a rutted road when suddenly it slowed way down. There was a camel in front, loping along at its own slow pace. The driver honked. The camel went faster. Then it slowed down again, apparently unconcerned about the van on its tail. The cycle of honking, trotting, and slowing down was repeated over and over again. The sight of Janet imitating the wagging gait of the camel’s behind can’t be captured in words, but perhaps you get the picture.

As she sat in the van, contemplating the dromedary, it occurred to Janet that there were miles of uninhabited land in every direction, yet the camel stayed on the road. If it had made the tiniest adjustment to its course—even a fraction of a degree—it would have had endless miles of unmolested space to roam in, and there would be respite from the honking and trotting. But apparently the camel hadn’t thought this through, and it kept to its uncomfortable course.

A lot of people do the same thing. You may be stressed and unhappy about the course of your life, but you just keep on walking in the same direction. When I’ve asked people why they don’t change their circumstances, the most common response is “fear.” They know the box that they’re stuck in. Even though it’s uncomfortable, it’s at least familiar. But if they change, there’s a chance that the unknown will be worse than their current situation. The enemy you know seems safer than the enemy you don’t know. The second most common reason why people fear change is that they feel overwhelmed by the amount of work it will take. But think of the camel. A change in course of just a fraction of a degree would have resulted in unlimited freedom.

I knew a working mother named “Shawna” whose dream was to become a nurse, but for years she was like the camel and stayed on her old course. She had a lot of valid reasons: School takes time and costs money. How could she and her son possibly survive if she quit work to study?

Then Shawna took a small step. Since her job paid for continuing-education courses at the local community college, she signed up for biology and loved it. The professor alerted her to a scholarship for older women entering nursing, and Shawna applied and was accepted. Student loans covered most of her living expenses, and she waited tables twice a week to cover the rest. Shawna became a nurse during the recent shortage. The hospital she signed on with gave her a cash bonus large enough to pay off most of her loans. One small change . . . and unimaginable opportunities opened up.

Psychologist Ellen Langer discovered that people who try new things are healthier and happier than those who stay in a rut. Even choosing a different route home from work benefits you. In her book,Mindfulness, she makes the point that variety keeps us engaged in life. You might be able to zone out if you’ve taken the same route a hundred times, but if you’re on unfamiliar turf, you have to stay tuned in. Tuning in encourages curiosity and results in a more adventurous life. An acquaintance of mine chose to drive a new way to work one day and got rear-ended in a traffic jam. But all’s well that ends well. She married the man who slammed into her.

This week, try making two small changes every day. Take a different street to work, turn off the television for an evening, go to a restaurant that serves exotic food, change your brand of toothpaste, smile at someone you don’t know, show up at work wearing Groucho Marx glasses, go to a different supermarket, get a more daring hairdo, eat dessert first, or buy or borrow a piece of clothing in a color you never wear. The possibilities are endless.

At the end of the week, reflect on what these little changes produced. Then think about your life. If you’re in a rut like Janet’s camel, identify one small step you might take toward change. There’s a whole lot of landscape to explore once you leave the beaten path.

(Excerpted from Chapter 20 of Inner Peace for Busy People by Joan Borysenko)

When you allow things, they change for the better! Eckhart Tolle

Published on Sep 30, 2017

In this video, Eckhart Tolle says that if we say yes to what is, then things change for the better!

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