Category: Bhagavad Gita


Facing Your Inner Battles

The strength to face the challenges in our life always rewards us with a refinement and evolution of our soul regardless if we win or lose the battle.

We all strive to live our soul’s purpose, but sometimes our mind conflicts with our feelings and causes confusion. The Bhagavad Gita is an ancient Hindu text that has an important teaching for those of us who experience this internal struggle. In this story, Arjuna the peaceful warrior is faced with a choice to act or not act in what he feels is a no-win situation for himself. If you have ever felt confusion or inner conflict holding you back, then the timeless wisdom in this story can bring clarity and relief.

Ahimsa is the principle of non-violence, which is a fundamental tenet of Hinduism. It is rooted in the belief that all lives, both human and non-human, are sacred. This is why on the eve of a great war, the choice between duty and non-violence leaves Arjuna in a state of inner conflict in this story. Being a peaceful warrior requires you to stand firmly in your spiritual path, dharma, but sometimes we don’t have the clarity to know what the best choice is. This requires an active fearlessness and non-attachment, which is embodied in the famous parable of Arjuna and Krishna’s discussion on the battlefield.

Arjuna is faced with inner conflict about going into battle.

The story begins with a young prince, Arjuna, who realizes that the enemies he’ll be fighting in an upcoming battle are his own relatives, beloved friends, and revered teachers. He turns to his charioteer confessing his conflicting emotions and his fears. His charioteer is actually the eternally wise Krishna. Here Arjuna talks to Krishna about his confusion:

…it is not proper for us to kill our own kinsmen, the sons of Dhritarashtra. For how, Krishna, shall we be happy after killing our own relatives? If the sons of Dhritarashtra, weapon in hand, should kill me in battle, me weaponless and not defending myself, that would be better for me. – Bhagavad Gita

As he contemplates no action at all and allowing his enemies to kill him, he hopes to stay true to his dedication to non-violence (ahimsa), but Krishna recognizes this as a cop-out. Compassion is said to come in the form of a lamb and a lion. We must accept that we are not perfect. This humility allows each of us to evolve forward from the place that we stand, rather than jump to absolute ideals.

Compassion is said to come in the form of a lamb and a lion.


Though Arjuna has mentally justified that he is being fearless and selfless to let his enemies kill him unarmed, he is actually avoiding his own dharma and here Krishna reminds him of this:

One’s own duty, though defective, is better than another’s duty well performed. – Bhagavad Gita

This is a call to hone one’s own inner voice and stay true to it; trusting that there are no wrong choices, only lessons to be learned. Duty is usually associated with something we don’t want to do, but it can feel quite empowering once we accept our role in a situation. When I was in my 20s, I was passionate about the environment and saving the world, but I was broke. I had gone past being able to be picky about a job that would help me pay the bills or feed myself, so I begrudgingly took a job as a landscaper.

Swinging a pick-axe in the hot sun, I was given the task of putting irrigation lines in to grow plants and grass that should not have been planted in the arid climate of Arizona. Non-native, drought-tolerant plants waste precious water in the desert landscape. I was miserable while I worked and felt a bit self-righteous about my sustainability ideals. Angry at the universe that I should have to do such a lowly chore, I put my nose to the grindstone and woke up early every day to make ends meet.

We need to find the warrior within and face our own dharma. Photo by Robert Sturman.


If you have ever felt conflicted about your life path then you will understand this feeling. In acceptance of the task at hand comes a certain humility, self-compassion, a sense of service, mental liberation, and even empowerment. This is central to karma yoga, which teaches us not to be attached to the outcome of our work, but to do it as a form of devotion to our own inner evolution.

Your business is with action alone; not by any means with the fruit of action. Let not the fruit of action be your motive to action. Let not your attachment be fixed on inaction.Therefore, always perform action, which must be performed, without attachment. For a man, performing action without attachment attains the Supreme. – Krishna to Arjuna

Even the most mundane actions in our day-to-day life are the result of choices we have made. The parable of Arjuna’s indecision on the battlefield is an extreme expression of this common circumstance and that is why it holds such value for us today. With clarity of mind, or mindfulness, along with personal accountability and non-attachment to outcome, we can have the courage to face any battle. A situation can be terrifying and feel like life or death even if it is not. The strength to face the challenges in our life always rewards us with a refinement and evolution of our soul, regardless if we win or lose the battle.

Mindfulness gives us the power to face any daily battle. Image by Alberto Montt.

To one that is born, death is certain; and to one that dies, birth is certain. Therefore, you should not grieve about things that are unavoidable. – Krishna to Arjuna

Sometimes it is the fear itself that dies (or an ego death) on this journey. Each one of us is here at this time for something greater than we can know or understand. The world is filled with terrifying possibilities, and mistakes are easy to come by. Sometimes the fear of making the wrong choice is more scary than the choices themselves, yet we are all here to fail as much as we are here to succeed.

Anyone with great success can also boast many failures. In this process, we learn to be more compassionate to ourselves and to those who have wronged us with their own poor behavior. The journey of soul evolution continues regardless. We must always put one foot in front of the other, and the path will appear with each step.

In this path to final emancipation, nothing that is commenced becomes wasted effort; no obstacles exist; and even a little of this form of sacred duty protects one from great danger. – Krishna to Arjuna

Put one foot in front of the other and the path will appear.

Knowing that we are in line with our dharma, and on the path (not the right path or the wrong path, just on the path), we begin to liberate and empower ourselves. These ancient parables, like the one told in the Bhagavad Gita, are meant to remind us of the eternal challenges that humans face and how to conquer our demons, even if we’d rather do nothing. Arjuna contemplates not taking up arms in battle, but after speaking with Krishna he follows his dharma and fights.

Being a peaceful warrior does not mean that you should be without your sword, as you never know when you might be called to unsheathe it. You can stand fearlessly in whatever circumstance you may face, knowing that you are not alone on the journey to personal evolution.

What are the three Gunas which control our lives? James Swartz Vedanta Bad Meinberg 2015

Published on Nov 25, 2015

Three Gunas:

Rajas:
Agitative Mind
Doing, doing, doing
To Gain certain things in the world: a Partner, Money, House, Children, … Business Mind
Downside? Stress, Burn-Out, Unhappy, Jealous, Over-Stimulated, …
Food: Sugar, Carbohydrates, Fast Food,…

Tamas:
Dull and Lazy Mind
Can’t do anything, can’t get up, I don’t want to do that, Fearful…
Downside? : Depression, Lack of Maturity, No Responsibility, Boredom, Blaming …
Food: Pizza, Fatty Food, Sauces, Carbohydrates, Cheese, Meat …

Sattva:
Clear Mind
Being able to make decisions, staying calm and making appropriate decisions,…
To understand the World, to understand Life
Downside? Arrogance, Becoming too Comfortable, Attract lots of needy people,…
Food: Salad, Fruits, likely cooked vegetables, raw food, certain proteins,…

All mistakes, poor editing and poor video quality is solely my responsibility: Georg Schiller georgvedantin@gmail.com. Neither James Swartz or anybody else is responsible for any of my mistakes.


Part of Religious Scholar, Philosopher & Spiritual Visionary, Dr. Ravi Ravindra’s lecture on the Yoga in the Bhagavad Gita at the Feathered Pipe.

Finding inner strength – Secrets of life through an ancient story. Bringing the ancient Bhagavad Gita into today’s life. Sri Sri Ravi Shankar shares it’s hidden meaning.

SRI SRI RAVI SHANKAR
Sri Sri Ravi Shankar: A humanitarian leader, spiritual teacher and ambassador of peace. His vision of a stress-free, violence-free society has united millions of people the world over through service projects and the courses of The Art of Living.

ART OF LIVING
Sri Sri founded The Art of Living as an international, non-profit, educational and humanitarian organization. Its educational and self-development programs offer powerful tools to eliminate stress and foster a sense of well-being.

The Essence of the Bhagavad Gita Explained by Paramhansa Yogananda as remembered by his disciple, Swami Kriyananda. This book shares the profound insights of Paramhansa Yogananda, author of Autobiography of a Yogi, as remembered by one of his few remaining direct disciples, Swami Kriyananda.

This revelation of India’s best-loved scripture approaches it from an entirely fresh perspective, showing its deep allegorical meaning and also its down-to-earth practicality. The themes presented are universal: how to achieve victory in life in union with the divine; how to prepare for life’s “final exam,” death, and what happens afterward; how to triumph over all pain and suffering.

Swami Kriyananda worked with Paramhansa Yogananda in 1950 while the Master completed his commentary of the Bhagavad Gita. At that time Yogananda commissioned him to disseminate his teachings world-wide. Kriyananda has in his lifetime lectured, taught, and written over one hundred books based on Yogananda’s teachings.

The Essence of the Bhagavad Gita is available from Crystal Clarity Publishers.

An inspired gathering of religious writings that reveals the “divine reality” common to all faiths, collected by Aldous Huxley

“The Perennial Philosophy,” Aldous Huxley writes, “may be found among the traditional lore of peoples in every region of the world, and in its fully developed forms it has a place in every one of the higher religions.”

With great wit and stunning intellect—drawing on a diverse array of faiths, including Zen Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Christian mysticism, and Islam—Huxley examines the spiritual beliefs of various religious traditions and explains how they are united by a common human yearning to experience the divine. The Perennial Philosophy includes selections from Meister Eckhart, Rumi, and Lao Tzu, as well as the Bhagavad Gita, Tibetan Book of the Dead, Diamond Sutra, and Upanishads, among many others.

Aldous Huxley (1894-1963) is the author of the classic novels Brave New World, Island, Eyeless in Gaza, and The Genius and the Goddess, as well as such critically acclaimed nonfiction works as The Devils of Loudun, The Doors of Perception, and The Perennial Philosophy. Born in Surrey, England, and educated at Oxford,he died in Los Angeles, California.

Click here to browse inside.

Aldous Huxley – The Dancing Shiva

Published on Mar 8, 2013

Aldous Huxley beautifully describes the ‘The Dancing Shiva’ symbol (Nataraja, Nataraj, nət̪əˈraːdʒ) of the Hindu spiritual tradition. Aldous Huxley was the author of many excellent books and essays including; Brave New World, Island, The Perennial Philosophy and The Doors of Perception.

This audio clip is taken from an interview which took place in London, England in 1961 entitled ‘Aldous Huxley – Speaking Personally’.

Images found on Google. Compiled by ☤ RevolutionLoveEvolve ☤

aldous huxley – darkness and light

Publication Date: Jun 14 2014

A verse-by-verse examination of the guide to self-transformation presented in the Bhagavad Gita

• Reveals the scientific approach to personal development and spiritual enlightenment laid out in Krishna’s advice to Arjuna

• Shows how the Gita prepares you to work with a guru, advocating authenticity and skepticism rather than blind devotion and obedience

• Explores Krishna’s advice on which societal limitations to reject to overcome your fears and reconnect with the suppressed parts of your inner being

Drawing on his more than 40 years of in-depth study of the Bhagavad Gita under the tutelage of his guru, Nitya Chaitanya Yati, author Scott Teitsworth explores the scientific approach to self-transformation and spiritual enlightenment encoded within Krishna’s advice to Arjuna in the Bhagavad Gita. Providing a verse-by-verse examination of the first two chapters, he reveals the Gita’s lessons to prepare the seeker to meet and successfully work with a guru–whether an outside teacher or the intuitive knowledge that arises from overcoming the psyche’s limitations.

The author shows that the Gita advocates not blind devotion to a guru or god but rather personal development, victory over your fears, and liberation of the psyche. He demonstrates how Krishna’s advice provides tools to guide us out of our fear-based experiences to reconnect with the suppressed parts of our inner being. He explains how Arjuna’s doubts and confusions represent the plight of every person–we are born free but gradually become enslaved by the demands of our society, continuously dependent on outside authority for answers and disconnected from our true inner nature. He reveals how Krishna’s advice offers guidance for dealing with life’s conflicts, which societal limitations to reject, and how to see through the polarizing notion of good versus evil to form a balanced state of mind superior to both.

Restoring the fearless vision of the ancient rishis, who, like today’s scientists, prized skepticism as an important technique for accessing truth, Teitsworth reveals the Gita as a guide to an authentic guru-disciple relationship as well as to constructing a life of significance, freedom, and true sovereign adulthood.

Scott Teitsworth is a lifelong student of Indian philosophy and modern science under the guidance of Nitya Chaitanya Yati, himself a disciple of Nataraja Guru. He hosts the Portland branch of the Narayana Gurukula along with his wife, where they have taught classes on the Bhagavad Gita and Indian philosophy since the 1970s. The author of Krishna in the Sky with Diamonds, he lives in Portland, Oregon.

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