Category: Buddhism, Tibetan


The first principle is becoming aware of our thoughts and the nature of thought. By taking the position of just being an observer of the thoughts and images that come and go we recognize all thoughts are the same: they are temporary appearances that come and go like clouds in the sky.

Give no importance to one thought over another. If we pay no attention to any thought but remain in the “observer” role, it seems the space of awareness becomes more open and thoughts less demanding of attention. We discover all thoughts are without substance and importance. We could say our thoughts are “empty”, like clouds: appearances without any core or entity.

The second principle is recognizing our stories and emotional dramas are structured only from thought, our “empty” thoughts. In continuing to observe our thoughts we should notice how they tend to link together in chains of meaning and particular significance. It is this linking together of thoughts that creates our stories, beliefs and emotional drama in a convincing and powerful way. As a result we may spend most of our time going from one mini-daydream to another.

It is this trance-like state of mind that we need to break up again and again as often as possible. We do that by shifting our attention from thought to the presence of the five senses in immediate now-ness. Just notice your physical environment and the direct sensory experience free of analysis. Practice this shifting away from mental engagement in thought to noticing your physical environs as often as possible.

The third principle is recognizing that one’s sense of self is also only an empty story made of thought; a mental construction without an actual identity as an entity that exists independently and with self-determinism.. There is no personal self present other than this make-believe “me” story.

Even science makes clear there is just one unified field of energy as the universe without separate parts. The entire field is inter-dependent without any breaks or splits in the unity. The sense of being an independent entity like a “personal self”, is just an illusion and has never existed in fact.

By observing the “me” thoughts that arise from moment to moment we can notice the “personal me” is nothing more than a chain of linked thoughts about identity that are supported by memories and imagination. Seeing this directly and clearly, not just intellectually, the emptiness of personal identity becomes obvious to the mind at which point the illusion ceases…

The fourth principle is recognizing what exactly is the nature of that which is observing and experiencing the empty nature of thoughts, stories and personal selfhood. What is doing the “recognizing”? What is this impersonal aware consciousness that perceives and knows? In these recognitions there seems to be an ever increasing evolution or revelation of wisdom. As a result one’s cognitive space seems expansive, open and vividly transparent without a center…

The fifth principle is recognizing the inseparable relationship between one’s empty, aware “seeing” and the five senses. One can’t find awareness separate from one’s sensory perceptions. There isn’t first a sensory perception and then an awareness of it. The five senses are this “knowing awareness” seeming to be split up into five separate sensory components. These sensory capacities are not limited to the physical five senses. “Knowing awareness” can perceive independently of the five physical senses with no limitations regarding time and space.

Merging our attention fully with the five senses instead of with the mental phenomena of thoughts, stories and beliefs in personal identity, reveals a state of total “nowness” beyond thought and mind. A limitless vista of knowing transparency and Clear Light reveals itself to be our true nature beyond any descriptions or assumptions of mind. In merging our attention totally with the five senses, the luminous nature of appearances reveals the empty vividness of our Aware and Knowing Space.

If one incorporates and integrates these five principles into one’s daily practice, in my opinion no other methods or practices should be considered necessary…

Written by ~ Jackson Peterson

Advertisements

Robert A.F. Thurman is the Jey Tsong Khapa Professor of Indo-Tibetan Buddhist Studies in the Department of Religion at Columbia University, President of the Tibet House U.S., a non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and promotion of Tibetan civilization, and President of the American Institute of Buddhist Studies, a non-profit affiliated with the Center for Buddhist Studies at Columbia University and dedicated to the publication of translations of important artistic and scientific treatises from the Tibetan Tengyur.

TIME Magazine chose Professor Thurman as one of its 25 most influential Americans in 1997, describing him as a “larger than life scholar-activist destined to convey the Dharma, the precious teachings of Shakyamuni Buddha, from Asia to America.” The New York Times recently said Thurman “is considered the leading American expert on Tibetan Buddhism.”

In this interview, we discuss Thurman’s latest book: Man of Peace: The Illustrated Life Story of the Dalai Lama of Tibet.

Thurman is known as a talented popularizer of the Buddha’s teachings. He is a riveting speaker and an author of many books on Tibet, Buddhism, art, politics, and culture.

Website: http://bobthurman.com

Isa Gucciardi, Ph.D. is the Founding Director of the Foundation of the Sacred Stream, a school for consciousness studies in Berkeley, CA. Isa is also the creator of the spiritual counseling model, Depth Hypnosis. In addition to her teaching schedule that includes teaching classes in Applied Buddhist Psychology, Applied Shamanism, Integrated Energy Medicine and Depth Hypnosis, she has active practices in Depth Hypnosis and Applied Shamanic Counseling in San Francisco, CA.

In this interview, we discuss Isa’s latest book: Coming to Peace: Resolving Conflict Within Ourselves and With Others

The essence of resolution lies in the recognition of the deep and unbroken connectedness that we share as human beings. This groundbreaking book shows how the processes of Coming to Peace meet those in conflict and provides them a pathway to reconciliation and wholeness.


Biography
In the mid-nineties, Isa began developing Depth Hypnosis as she entered into clinical practice. Her studies, both in academia and in the field, of cultural and linguistic anthropology, comparative religion, and transpersonal psychology formed the basis of her approach with clients and students. As the body of work that grew out of her clinical practice became larger, she began teaching others so that more people could benefit from the techniques she had developed. In order to accommodate the number of classes that grew out of this process, she co-founded the Foundation of the Sacred Stream, which is now a school for consciousness studies in Berkeley, California, serving hundreds of students each year. Isa teaches and speaks nationally and internationally, and she has published numerous articles, podcast episodes, and videos, and the book Return to the Great Mother. She maintains a private practice with institutions and individuals in Depth Hypnosis and Coming to Peace processes. Isa speaks five languages and has lived in eleven countries. She is the mother of two children and lives with her partner in San Francisco.

Coming to Peace: Methods for Shaman & Siddhas by Isa Gucciardi at Menla

Coming to Peace is a hybrid conflict resolution method that was born out of core mediation practices from a variety of earth-based wisdom traditions and Buddhism. The essence of resolution lies in the recognition of the deep and unbroken connectedness that we share as human beings. This book shows how the processes of Coming to Peace meet those in conflict and provides them a pathway to reconciliation and wholeness.

This is an excerpt from the first morning meditation by Isa Gucciardi from their Tibet House US Retreat “Shaman & Siddhas” recorded March 2016 at Menla in Phoenicia, New York.

To learn more about upcoming programs with Isa Gucciardi + Robert Thurman at Menla please visit: http://bit.ly/Menla2017

This recording is a part of the Tibet House US Member archive. To watch more videos from past programs & to learn more about the benefits of becoming a monthly supporter please visit: https://tibethouse.us/tibet-house-us-…

Isa Gucciardi is the Founding Director and lead teacher of the Foundation of the Sacred Stream. The workshops and training programs of the Foundation are part of her larger vision for helping people who are interested in stepping into greater consciousness and leading happier lives. Her primary focus is on teaching, writing, and curriculum development. Isa is also the creator of the groundbreaking therapeutic model, Depth Hypnosis, which is born from her studies in transpersonal psychology, cultural and linguistic anthropology, comparative religion, hypnotherapy, and transformational healing. Isa has lived in eleven countries and she speaks five languages. The mother of two children, she is a potter and gardener, a stained glass artist, a piano enthusiast, and an herbalist. In addition to her busy teaching schedule, she has an active Depth Hypnosis counseling and consulting practice in San Francisco, CA.

This video is an excerpt from an interview with Dr. Allan Wallace. He has been a scholar and practitioner of Buddhism since 1970, and has taught Buddhist theory and meditation worldwide since 1976. Having devoted fourteen years to training as a Tibetan Buddhist monk, ordained by H. H. the Dalai Lama, he went on to earn an undergraduate degree in physics and the philosophy of science at Amherst College and a doctorate in religious studies at Stanford.
http://www.alanwallace.org/

Lama Surya Das riffs on enlightenment with a native New Yorker’s accent and attitude. When he first encountered Buddhism in the late 1960s, the Jewish-born teenager from Long Island dove in heart-first, devoting four decades of his life to spiritual study, practice, and teaching. Nicknamed “the Western Lama” by the Dalai Lama, he’s a best-selling author and the founder of the Dzogchen Center. A revered spokesman for American Buddhism, he tackles life’s urgent questions on his blog askthelama.com.

What does it mean to be an American Buddhist?

Being an American Buddhist means practicing what Buddha taught but in a modern place. Maybe you don’t sit cross-legged on the floor, shave your head, or wear a yellow robe in a monastery. You may. But Western Buddhism is often more lay-oriented, integrated with daily life and not separated like in the East. It means awakening one’s self in the world, becoming a spiritual activist, a bodhisattva who is healing the world, restoring it to balance and wholeness. That sounds good, but how? The great spiritual traditions, the eightfold path, the Buddhist practices—mindfulness and meditation—can help you become a better whatever-you-are. As I always say, it’s better to become a Buddha than a mere Buddhist.

If you strip away all of the ceremony or accouterments, how do you know you’re still practicing Buddhism?

Being a good person is more important than the “ism.” What are the active ingredients of Buddhism? It’s not what color the robes are. They could be helpful, but the costume is not the person. The Dalai Lama says it comes down to wisdom and compassion. The four truths of Buddhism’s eightfold path involve action and behavior, transforming your attitude: less selfishness, more generosity and patience. Mindfulness. Clarity. And on the deepest level, being in touch with the timeless. We’re Buddhas by nature; we just have to awaken to that fact. That’s the meaning of enlightenment.

We’re like bubbles in the sea. When the bubble merges with the sea, it realizes that it’s never been apart. It’s H2O all the way through. So you don’t have to slay your ego; you just have to see through your separateness. You’ll still have a healthy, individuated sense of self, but you’re not an egoist.

Having a teacher helps. A spiritual elder helps prevent self-deception, one of the most pernicious pitfalls on the path. Teachers help you see your highest self, your Buddha nature, rather than just your human foibles. When you see how they love you unconditionally, you can start to love yourself unconditionally.

How do you cultivate stillness in the modern world?

It’s always been a challenge to live a spiritual life. Look back into history—people didn’t have Facebook, but they had marauding hordes, child mortality, and 40-year life spans. We have a lot of advantages. Ancient wisdom has always told us that life is long enough for those who know how to live.

So, find your center wherever you are, whether you have interruptions by social media, your kids, or an elder you’re taking care of. Look inside; look deeper to find the eye of the hurricane. The axis of the wheel doesn’t change while the spokes turn. Maybe you have to stop what you’re doing to have a moment of sublime silence—whatever the noise level—to be with God and find the silence that is always there, in your heart cave.


Culadasa (John Yates, Ph.D.) is a meditation master with over four decades of experience in the Tibetan and Theravadin Buddhist traditions. He taught physiology and neuroscience for many years at the Universities of Calgary and British Columbia. Later, he worked at the forefront of healthcare education and therapeutic massage, serving as the founding director of the West Coast College of Massage Therapy. Culadasa retired from academia in 1996, moving with his wife into an old Apache stronghold in the Arizona wilderness, where they deepened their spiritual practice together. He currently leads the Dharma Treasure Buddhist Sangha in Tucson, Arizona and holds retreats across the United States.

In addition to teaching meditation, Culadasa is the author of the groundbreaking book, A Physician’s Guide to Therapeutic Massage, which has been through several editions and is still frequently used in classrooms today. He is also a lifelong sitar player and an amateur woodworker, with several hand-carved canoes hanging from the ceiling of his workshop. His wife Nancy and he run Cochise Stronghold Canyon Nature Retreat, a nationally recognized B&B featured in the travel section of The New York Times.

Culadasa’s forthcoming book, The Mind Illuminated, is the first comprehensive guide to Buddhist meditation for a Western audience. It combines age-old teachings with the latest research in cognitive psychology and neuroscience, providing meditators with step-by-step guidance for every stage of the path – from your very first sit, all the way to mastery of the deepest states of peace and insight. This is the clear, friendly, and in-depth meditation manual that people have been waiting for.

Let compassion and fearlessness guide you and you’ll live wisely and effectively in good times and bad. But that’s easier said than done. Here Pema Chödrön introduces a powerful, transformative method to nurture these qualities using a practice called lojong, which has been a primary focus of her teachings and personal practice for many years. And for centuries, Tibetan Buddhists have relied on these teachings to awaken the deep goodness that lies within us.

The lojong teachings include fifty-nine pithy slogans for daily contemplation, such as “Always maintain only a joyful mind,” “Don’t be swayed by external circumstances,” “Don’t try to be the fastest,” and “Be grateful to everyone.” This book presents each of these slogans and includes Pema’s clear, succinct guidance on how to understand them—and how they can enrich our lives. It also features a forty-five minute downloadable audio program entitled “Opening the Heart,” in which Pema offers in-depth instruction on tonglen meditation, a powerful practice that anyone can undertake to awaken compassion for oneself and others.

PEMA CHÖDRÖN is an American Buddhist nun in the lineage of renowned Tibetan meditation master Chögyam Trungpa and resident teacher at Gampo Abbey in Nova Scotia, the first Tibetan monastery in North America established for Westerners. She is the author of many books and audiobooks, including the best-selling When Things Fall Apart and Don’t Bite the Hook.

Read here

Pema Chödrön – Full Lecture On Pain And Compassion

Published on Oct 7, 2016

Pema Chödrön is an American, Tibetan Buddhist. She is an ordained nun, acharya and disciple of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche. Chodron has written several books and is the director of the Gampo Abbey in Nova Scotia, Canada.


A senior Buddhist teacher offers six fundamental body-based meditation practices that show the reader that enlightenment is as close to you as your own body.

Many of us experience life through so many conceptual filters that we never recognize the freedom and joy that are inherent in us—and are in fact the essence of who we are. We can grow old not realizing that one of the most powerful tools to escape the painful knots we tie ourselves in is, literally, at our fingertips: our body.

Here, Reggie Ray cracks open the shell of the mind-body dichotomy and presents six fundamental body-based practices that connect us back to who we really are. These practices cut through the mental fabrications through which we experience our world and lead us directly to the richness of living a fully present, embodied human life.

DR. REGINALD “REGGIE” RAY is the co-founder and Spiritual Director of the Dharma Ocean Foundation, dedicated to the evolution and flowering of the somatic teachings of Tibetan Buddhism. He is a lineage holder in the tradition of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche. Reggie is the author of several books–including Indestructible Truth and Secrets of the Vajra World— as well as and audio programs–including Mahamudra for the Modern World. He makes his residence in Crestone and Boulder, Colorado.

LOOK INSIDE

Reggie Ray ‘Finding Realization In The Body’ Interview by Renate McNay

Reggie Ray ‘Finding Realization In The Body’ Interview by Renate McNay.

The transcript of this interview is available to view here.
http://www.conscious.tv/text/89.htm

The transcript of the somatic meditation is available to view here.
http://www.conscious.tv/text/90.htm


Ego is not the enemy, ego is Absolute Consciousness you no longer have to fight it. This is an excerpt from Daniel Odier’s Tandava the Cosmic Dance day long practice at SAND16 in Italy.

Daniel Odier became a disciple of Kalou Rinpoche in 1968. Following his teachings, he receives the transmission of Mahamudra. Daniel taught Tantrism and Buddhism in several American universities before founding in 1995, the center Tantra / Chan in Paris. In 2000, he dissolved the center to encourage independent practice and today leads seminars in different countries. His books on Tantra, have been translated into eight languages and deal with the deeper aspects of the Shaivite and Tantric way of Chan.

Recognized as Sifu (Chan master) Daniel brings together budddhism and direct contact with the daily essence of Chan. The practice is centered on meditation in the style of Zhao Zhou, with moments of meditation alternated with free-style walking, in pure presence. (www.zhaozhou-chan.com)

The Buddha of Love

Excerpted from Embracing Each Moment by Anam Thubten

The Buddha Maitreya is considered the buddha of the future. His name, Buddha Maitreya, translates as the “Buddha of love.” To me, Buddha Maitreya is an archetype, a sacred allegory representing something profound and innate in each of us, our innate love. Love is innate to all of us, and we can regard love and compassion as our basic instincts. Our basic instincts are not all dark and impure. Love is our most basic human instinct, along with intelligence, compassion, and courage. There is love in all of us. There is even universal love, all-embracing love, in all of us. This is part of who we are. There are many forms of love. Love comes in a variety of flavors and textures. We experience love for family members, love for friends, love for animals, and love for the world of nature. Love is this authentic feeling that transcends judgment, hatred, and envy. It embraces one person or a group of people in our hearts with trust and kindness. This unconditional acceptance and affinity is what love is.

We feel love for many people in our lifetime, and it is quite easy to love the world of nature—the beautiful forest, the majestic mountains. Our hearts open when we are standing before sunsets or mountains or great rivers. We all love nature easily. We don’t have to meditate for a long time or go through psychoanalysis to love nature. At a very early age, we humans start demonstrating our intrinsic love toward the world of nature as well as toward the animal kingdom. We love animals most of the time. It is easy to love our pets, and of course, they love us unconditionally. They often show their unconditional love and their loyalty toward us. Not only that, they are extremely charming most of the time. Some animals are much easier to love. Those little dogs you see now and then are so sweet and adorable!

However, our love toward humanity is very complicated. When we love a human being, that love can be quite heroic. Perhaps it is much more heroic or profound than our love of nature or anything else. When we really love somebody, we are able to sacrifice ourselves.

We have this selfless, big heart, through which we can have the willingness to carry the other person’s suffering and pain. And we can have unquestioning determination to share our happiness, our glory, and our richness with that person. It is said that this kind of love toward all living beings was felt by Buddha himself all the time. Many great, awakened masters felt this love too.

At the same time, it is very difficult to love humanity. When you walk on the street or drive on the highway, try to look around. Make sure you look around and recognize all the human beings.

Can you love them? Can you find sacredness, holiness, or some kind of charming quality in them? You know that sometimes it is very difficult to open your heart and find the beauty and holiness in human beings that you can find quite easily in nature or even animals. That is why many people have a much easier time loving animals than loving human beings. Sometimes it is very difficult to accept human beings with their complex personalities. Yet this is the only way we can evolve. Sooner or later, we must learn how to love all humanity. We must learn how to recognize the charm, the sweetness, and the adorable qualities in humanity without any exclusions. Perhaps we may think that such love is impossible, but the truth is that this love is very possible. Having this love in your heart is the only way you can evolve. It is the only way you can find healing, transformation, and true happiness. So Buddha Maitreya, the future buddha, is only an archetype. We all are future buddhas. We all are the Buddha Maitreya. The Buddha Maitreya symbolizes this all-embracing love.

One time, the Buddhist master Asanga was meditating in the forest. He was hoping that soon he would see a divine vision of Buddha Maitreya. He meditated for twelve years without any sign of achievement. After meditating for twelve years in the forest and hoping to see the divine vision of Buddha Maitreya, he was quite disappointed. He decided to quit his quest. On the way home, he ran into a wounded dog lying on the street. This poor dog’s entire body was covered with maggots. He felt genuine love and compassion toward this wounded dog. He wanted to help it and remove all the maggots eating its body. First he tried to remove the insects with his hands, but then he also felt love and compassion toward those embracing each moment insects. He was afraid of killing them with his hands. He decided to remove them with his tongue. The sight was so grotesque he could not touch the maggots with his tongue while his eyes were open.

He closed his eyes and stuck out his tongue. Suddenly there was no more wounded dog. He had a vision of Buddha Maitreya. Of course,this is a very famous story that you don’t have to take literally. It can be a metaphorical story. You are Buddha Maitreya, and you are the future buddha. There is an all-embracing love inside you. You are born with it. This is your basic instinct. You just have to find a way to rekindle it.

Again, there are many forms of love. There is spiritual or divine love. This is love without any object, which is a very powerful love. There are many beautiful and powerful practices than can help us to evoke this spiritual, objectless love. Most of the time, our love has an object. True spiritual love, divine love, has no object. This is why the Hindus often practice bhakti yoga, which is the yoga of divine love. You can feel this spiritual love, love toward Avalokiteshvara, love toward Guanyin. Guanyin is not an object. Avalokiteshvara is not an object. The truth is that you will never find Avalokiteshvara from outside. As a Mahayana and Tantric Buddhist, I have practiced many sadhanas, Buddhist versions of bhakti yoga. For a long time, I practiced the Avalokiteshvara sadhana. I felt this profound, almost transcendent level of love toward Avalokiteshvara. For a long time, I wanted to see Avalokiteshvara. Of course, in the end I could not find Avalokiteshvara because Avalokiteshvara is not an object.

When you can’t find Avalokiteshvara and still love Avalokiteshvara, that is true spiritual love that is transcendent love.

Source: Spirituality Health

View Here on Embracing Each Moment

Mantra Of Avalokiteshvara | Medicine Buddha Mantra, Mantra Of Avalokiteshvara, Mantra of Avalokiteshvara Tibetan..
Mantra Of Avalokiteshvara Lyrics:
……………………………………………
Namo Ratna Trayaya,
Namo Arya Jnana
Sagara, Vairochana,
Byuhara Jara Tathagataya,
Arahate, Samyaksam Buddhaya,
Namo Sarwa Tathagate Bhyay,
Arhata Bhyah,
Samyaksam Buddhe Bhyah,
Namo Arya Avalokite
shoraya Bodhisattvaya,
Maha Sattvaya,
Maha Karunikaya,
Tadyata, Om Dara Dara,
Diri Diri, Duru Duru
Itte We, Itte Chale Chale,
Purachale Purachale,
Kusume Kusuma Wa Re,
Ili Milli, Chiti Jvalam, Apanaye Shoha.

His Holiness the Dalai Lama provides intimate details on an advanced meditation practice called Dzogchen using a visionary poem by the 19th-century saint Patrul Rinpoche, author of the Buddhist classic Words of My Perfect Teacher.

The Dalai Lama deftly connects how training the mind in compassion for other beings is directly related to—and in fact a prerequisite for—the very pinnacle of Buddhist meditation. He presents his understanding, confirmed again and again over millennia, that the cultivation of both compassion and wisdom is absolutely critical to progress in meditation and goes into great depth on how this can be accomplished.

While accessible to a beginner, he leads the reader in very fine detail on how to identify innermost awareness—who we really are—how to maintain contact with this awareness, and how to release oneself from the endless stream of our thoughts to let this awareness, always present, become consistently apparent.

HIS HOLINESS THE FOURTEENTH DALAI LAMA
is considered the foremost Buddhist leader of our time. The exiled head of the Tibetan people, he is a Nobel Peace Laureate, a Congressional Gold Medal recipient, and a remarkable teacher and scholar who has authored over one hundred books. JEFFREY HOPKINS is Founder and President of the UMA Institute for Tibetan Studies. He is Professor Emeritus of Tibetan Buddhist Studies at the University of Virginia, where he taught Tibetan Buddhist Studies and Tibetan language for thirty-two years from 1973. He served as His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s chief interpreter into English on lecture tours for ten years, 1979-1989, and has translated and edited fifteen books from oral teachings by His Holiness the Dalai Lama. He has also published numerous translations of important Buddhist texts that represent the diversity of views found in Tibetan Buddhism.

LOOK INSIDE

Dalai Lama Talk : Awareness of Peace, Mindfulness And Wellbeing

Dalai Lama Talk: Awareness of Peace, Mindfulness and Wellbeing

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama Emphasizes his belief that the entire concept of war is based on the “…us and them…” or “…we and they…” way of thinking.
The wars of the last century stem from a “…self-centered attitude…”

His holiness talks frankly about meeting world leaders and discussing the reasons and thinking behind nations going to war. When meeting a world leader for the first time”…not mentioning any names…” the first visit is very stand off-ish, the next time a little closer, the third visit they would talk. And his holiness suggested that this type of gap between people is a contributing factor in the reason nations engage in war.
With emphasis on George Bush and the Iraq – Afghanistan wars. He says he believed the presidents heart was in the right place but his method was wrong. Using force was wrong.

The Dalai Lama also speaks about overcoming tragedy by always trying to see things from different angels. He speaks of losing his country of Tibet and becoming a refugee and how that was “…most fortunate…” because he was able to leave behind a mostly ceremonial life in Tibet and travel, meet new people and speak all over the world. His Holiness say’s that the tragedy of losing Tibet, woke up the Tibetan people.

“..200,000,000 people killed, such immense violence and suffering and including the use of two nuclear bombs once Nagasaki once Hiroshima, I personally visited these areas … men use these things out of strong anger, hatred…” Now the next 100 years will not be free of problems, global warming, population explosion etc. but we have the opportunity for nations to approach these problems with “…peaceful means…” and “…non violence…”.

“…My body speech and mind I dedicate to the wellbeing of others…” – His Holiness the 14Th Dalai Lama.

Delightful and accessible teachings on the path to liberation from a Tibetan Buddhist master who makes the teachings accessible to one and all.

The main themes of the popular Bay Area Buddhist teacher Anam Thubten’s Buddhist teachings are presented here in a concise collection of his teachings. His Tibetan Buddhist wisdom has broad appeal, to the extent that non-Buddhists are often in attendance at his dharma teachings. He focuses on traditional teachings on non-grasping, non-self–but also on happiness, love, and the sacred nature of all things. Reading this book is like being there at one of his inspiring presentations on the basics of the Buddhist path.

Anam Thubten grew up in Tibet and undertook Buddhist training in the Nyingma tradition at an early age. He has been teaching in the West since the 1990s and is the spiritual adviser and Dharma teacher for the Dharmata Foundation.

Beyond Division – Awakening to Sacredness: An Interview with Anam Thubten

Anam Thubten is a teacher in the Nyingma tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. Born in Tibet, he received traditional Buddhist training from a number of teachers at a young age, and was particularly inspired by a hermit called Lama Tsurlo. In the 1990s Anam Thubten went to the US, where he lives today. He is the founder and spiritual adviser of the Dharmata Foundation in California, and is becoming increasingly well known both in the US and abroad. His books in English include “The Magic of Awareness” and “No Self, No Problem.”

This interview was recorded on a visit to Hong Kong in late 2014.

Be inspired by more Buddhist content at our main website, Buddhistdoor: http://www.buddhistdoor.net/


http://www.DalaiLamaFilm.com – Your Transformation is NOW… NEW ‘Dalai Lama Awakening’ Film (narrated by Harrison Ford).

Critics say: “Brilliant” – “Transformational” – “a Stunning Tour-de-Force” – “a Powerful Cinematic Documentary”

Available on DVD NOW, and iTunes in June 2016: http://www.DalaiLamaFilm.com

The film also features: Thom Hartmann, Amit Goswami, Fred Alan Wolf, Jean Houston, Vicki Robin, Elisabet Sahtouris, Vandana Shiva, and others

NEW Dalai Lama Awakening (narrated by Harrison Ford) – Official Trailer #2

http://www.DalaiLamaFilm.com – Your transformation is NOW. Experience this film in a cinema in your area soon. ‘Dalai Lama Awakening’ and Director Khashyar Darvich are touring the U.S.-Canada from Sept 2014 – Feb 2015. For the full tour schedule, please visit: http://www.DalaiLamaFilm.com. This is the first trailer for the new transformational documentary film ‘Dalai Lama Awakening,’ which features the Dalai Lama and is narrated by Harrison Ford. This is the Director’s Cut and New Poetic ReVision of the Award-winning ‘Dalai Lama Renaissance’ film. Others featured in the film include: Quantum Physicists Fred Alan Wolf and Amit Goswami, radio host Thom Hartmann, Revolutionary Social Scientist Jean Houston, Michael Beckwith.

%d bloggers like this: