Category: Dharma


Facing Your Inner Battles

The strength to face the challenges in our life always rewards us with a refinement and evolution of our soul regardless if we win or lose the battle.

We all strive to live our soul’s purpose, but sometimes our mind conflicts with our feelings and causes confusion. The Bhagavad Gita is an ancient Hindu text that has an important teaching for those of us who experience this internal struggle. In this story, Arjuna the peaceful warrior is faced with a choice to act or not act in what he feels is a no-win situation for himself. If you have ever felt confusion or inner conflict holding you back, then the timeless wisdom in this story can bring clarity and relief.

Ahimsa is the principle of non-violence, which is a fundamental tenet of Hinduism. It is rooted in the belief that all lives, both human and non-human, are sacred. This is why on the eve of a great war, the choice between duty and non-violence leaves Arjuna in a state of inner conflict in this story. Being a peaceful warrior requires you to stand firmly in your spiritual path, dharma, but sometimes we don’t have the clarity to know what the best choice is. This requires an active fearlessness and non-attachment, which is embodied in the famous parable of Arjuna and Krishna’s discussion on the battlefield.

Arjuna is faced with inner conflict about going into battle.

The story begins with a young prince, Arjuna, who realizes that the enemies he’ll be fighting in an upcoming battle are his own relatives, beloved friends, and revered teachers. He turns to his charioteer confessing his conflicting emotions and his fears. His charioteer is actually the eternally wise Krishna. Here Arjuna talks to Krishna about his confusion:

…it is not proper for us to kill our own kinsmen, the sons of Dhritarashtra. For how, Krishna, shall we be happy after killing our own relatives? If the sons of Dhritarashtra, weapon in hand, should kill me in battle, me weaponless and not defending myself, that would be better for me. – Bhagavad Gita

As he contemplates no action at all and allowing his enemies to kill him, he hopes to stay true to his dedication to non-violence (ahimsa), but Krishna recognizes this as a cop-out. Compassion is said to come in the form of a lamb and a lion. We must accept that we are not perfect. This humility allows each of us to evolve forward from the place that we stand, rather than jump to absolute ideals.

Compassion is said to come in the form of a lamb and a lion.


Though Arjuna has mentally justified that he is being fearless and selfless to let his enemies kill him unarmed, he is actually avoiding his own dharma and here Krishna reminds him of this:

One’s own duty, though defective, is better than another’s duty well performed. – Bhagavad Gita

This is a call to hone one’s own inner voice and stay true to it; trusting that there are no wrong choices, only lessons to be learned. Duty is usually associated with something we don’t want to do, but it can feel quite empowering once we accept our role in a situation. When I was in my 20s, I was passionate about the environment and saving the world, but I was broke. I had gone past being able to be picky about a job that would help me pay the bills or feed myself, so I begrudgingly took a job as a landscaper.

Swinging a pick-axe in the hot sun, I was given the task of putting irrigation lines in to grow plants and grass that should not have been planted in the arid climate of Arizona. Non-native, drought-tolerant plants waste precious water in the desert landscape. I was miserable while I worked and felt a bit self-righteous about my sustainability ideals. Angry at the universe that I should have to do such a lowly chore, I put my nose to the grindstone and woke up early every day to make ends meet.

We need to find the warrior within and face our own dharma. Photo by Robert Sturman.


If you have ever felt conflicted about your life path then you will understand this feeling. In acceptance of the task at hand comes a certain humility, self-compassion, a sense of service, mental liberation, and even empowerment. This is central to karma yoga, which teaches us not to be attached to the outcome of our work, but to do it as a form of devotion to our own inner evolution.

Your business is with action alone; not by any means with the fruit of action. Let not the fruit of action be your motive to action. Let not your attachment be fixed on inaction.Therefore, always perform action, which must be performed, without attachment. For a man, performing action without attachment attains the Supreme. – Krishna to Arjuna

Even the most mundane actions in our day-to-day life are the result of choices we have made. The parable of Arjuna’s indecision on the battlefield is an extreme expression of this common circumstance and that is why it holds such value for us today. With clarity of mind, or mindfulness, along with personal accountability and non-attachment to outcome, we can have the courage to face any battle. A situation can be terrifying and feel like life or death even if it is not. The strength to face the challenges in our life always rewards us with a refinement and evolution of our soul, regardless if we win or lose the battle.

Mindfulness gives us the power to face any daily battle. Image by Alberto Montt.

To one that is born, death is certain; and to one that dies, birth is certain. Therefore, you should not grieve about things that are unavoidable. – Krishna to Arjuna

Sometimes it is the fear itself that dies (or an ego death) on this journey. Each one of us is here at this time for something greater than we can know or understand. The world is filled with terrifying possibilities, and mistakes are easy to come by. Sometimes the fear of making the wrong choice is more scary than the choices themselves, yet we are all here to fail as much as we are here to succeed.

Anyone with great success can also boast many failures. In this process, we learn to be more compassionate to ourselves and to those who have wronged us with their own poor behavior. The journey of soul evolution continues regardless. We must always put one foot in front of the other, and the path will appear with each step.

In this path to final emancipation, nothing that is commenced becomes wasted effort; no obstacles exist; and even a little of this form of sacred duty protects one from great danger. – Krishna to Arjuna

Put one foot in front of the other and the path will appear.

Knowing that we are in line with our dharma, and on the path (not the right path or the wrong path, just on the path), we begin to liberate and empower ourselves. These ancient parables, like the one told in the Bhagavad Gita, are meant to remind us of the eternal challenges that humans face and how to conquer our demons, even if we’d rather do nothing. Arjuna contemplates not taking up arms in battle, but after speaking with Krishna he follows his dharma and fights.

Being a peaceful warrior does not mean that you should be without your sword, as you never know when you might be called to unsheathe it. You can stand fearlessly in whatever circumstance you may face, knowing that you are not alone on the journey to personal evolution.

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Published on Mar 26, 2017

The responsibility of calling yourself a disciple is enormous and not to be taken lightly. The dissolution of self identity is an often difficult road.


Published on Feb 8, 2017

Sruti is a spiritual teacher who writes about finding God within an experience with an uncommon and painful illness called Interstitial Cystitis. She has been interviewed on the Buddha at the Gas Pump talk show on YouTube about her experience of spiritual awakening in the midst of intense pain: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atG0z…

This ongoing and chronic condition challenged her to stay present with daily pain and to look further inward for answers. In an extreme moment of pain, in which consciousness began to fade, Sruti experienced the erasure of all that clouds over the earliest source of vision.

She watched as one by one the layers of the mind, the body and feelings disappeared before her. She asks the question: Who is the One that Can Never Leave You? With whose vision are we seeing when the lights are going out? Has this early vision ever known anything at all?

Sruti’s book, The Hidden Value of Not Knowing, is available as an audiobook and an eBook online at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IBZFPIM
The book can also be ordered in print form: http://www.blurb.com/b/7133487-the-hi…

As we close our eyes and feel our bodies, we contemplate the trillions of cells performing their individual task with such optimal efficiency and perfection, with such amazing synchronicity… This working together while maintaining the individual space and duty is the foundation of dharma. This is the simplest example where the whole of the cosmos and billions of galaxies are in the infinite space, all and each following their dharma, their path. No clashes. No confusion. No conflict.

But when we come to humanity, although man is an animal like any other species, we use our intelligence, yet always deviate from the path and the truth that is dharma. An animal never kills when its hunger is appeased. But humanity’s greed is insatiable. It can devour the whole world. Human greed is a ghost with a mouth and narrow neck, but a bottomless stomach.

How Can We Seek Balance in Life?

Nature has its own balancing system. It is not that someone has to bring something to it or do something. It is done all the time, like the balancing system of our own body. Through the karmic process of churning and changing, the soul comes to realize certain simple truths of life: that to hurt is to invite hurt, to love is to be loved, to give is the path to receive. Positive thoughts of light bring forth the materialization of happy events and the law of attraction is like the law of gravitation. And this whole universe and tiny planet Earth all are under the law that is dharma. The order. It is commanded by one invisible, ultimate source.

The moment we give that source a name, religious dogmas come with it, and our ego takes over its bounden task of proving my God is bigger, better, richer than yours. The whole order is ransacked in the name of God. That is the human tendency.

Is Dharma Like a Religion?

Dharma is not religion, like Christianity, nor Buddhism, nor Judaism, nor Hinduism, nor Islam. The world has seen a river of blood flowing all over in the name of religion. Dharma is the order, the law that governs the subtle textures that are all interconnected and interwoven with love and light.

We are gradually moving toward that Light, which is the essence of all existence. We are moving toward that source which defies all foolish human definitions and creating of religions. We have had enough of religions. Enough of fanaticism and bloodshed. The Spiritual global movement is inspiring and motivating humanity toward the common goal of LOVE FOR EACH OTHER: Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam. The world is one human family moving toward the religionless world of love and gratitude.

Yes, that day is not far when there will be one dharma, one law, one order that is love and gratitude. All religions will be buried under the manmade ground of greed based civilization and the new age will dawn where there is no more conflict and battles, wars and bloodsheds, but love and peace, harmony and joy.

True dharma will unite humanity as one family. Any religion that does not do that is false.

Shuddhaanandaa Brahmachari (Kolkata, India): Globally acclaimed motivational teacher (mindfulness meditation, stress reduction) author, peacemaker (Man of Peace Award 2012) Visionary social advocate; founded Lokenath Divine Life Mission, 1985. Serves thousands of poverty-stricken individuals in India.

Source: Om Times


Estimated release date: 4/15/2014

A handbook for unlocking the soul’s purpose and manifesting a fulfilling life

• Reinterprets the traditional Dharma system of ancient India as a map for revealing one’s true purpose

• Provides tests for determining one’s Dharma type

• Explains the benefits, challenges, and social, interpersonal, and health dynamics associated with each of the 5 Dharma types

Have you ever wondered why, despite great obstacles, some people achieve success, while others, though given everything, seem to squander it away? Or why some people, despite having very little, radiate joy, while others appear miserable though surrounded by opulence? The answer is Dharma: knowing your soul’s purpose and living it is the key to creating a fulfilling life.

Built on a deep body of Vedic knowledge, the ancient system of social structure and spiritual duty known as Dharma has modern applications for people seeking their life’s purpose. Author Simon Chokoisky explains the five Dharma archetypes–Warrior, Educator, Merchant, Laborer, and Outsider–and how your life’s purpose goes hand-in-hand with your Dharma type. Providing tests to determine your type, he outlines the benefits, challenges, emotional and learning styles, and social, interpersonal, and health dynamics associated with each type.

Chokoisky reveals how the Dharma types function as an operating system for your identity, helping you map your life and play to your innate strengths, whether in choosing a prosperous career or field of study or in facing health challenges and meeting fitness goals. By accepting and understanding the nature of your type, you begin to align with your true purpose and, regardless of fate, find joy and meaning in life.

Simon Chokoisky teaches Sanskrit and Medical Astrology at the Ayurvedic Institute in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He also runs a private consulting business based on his trainings in Vedic life mapping and Vedic astrology. The creator of the Decoding Your Life Map with Vedic Astrology DVD series, he travels widely giving seminars. He lives in Albuquerque, New Mexico.


In this talk Simon reveals the five levels of dharma, and why they are crucial to feeling at one with your body, your environment, your purpose, the cosmos, and with your divine source. The five levels are:
1. The Physical
2. The Environmental
3. The Social
4. The Cosmic
5. The Spiritual
The key to getting the most from these is understanding the technology of how they work together. In this talk, Simon focuses on the first two

The 5 Dharma Types – Simon Chokoisky

This is an extended explanation of the origin of the book The 5 Dharma Types, by Simon Chokoisky


Published on Jul 26, 2016

Tara Talks: Reflection – Witnessing the Fear Body – Tara Brach

The first step in healing the fear body is becoming a witness to what is happening inside us.


Published on Jun 21, 2016

Tara Talks: Reaching out to Loving Presence – Tara Brach

While our small self can’t hold the suffering within us, when we reach out to love, we awaken to a vaster space of loving presence that was unseen, but is always here.


Published on May 19, 2016

There is enough space in your heart for everything to peacefully exist.
Love is your security and fear always your weakness.
When you have choice, choose love – and you always have a choice.
May all beings be happy.

Published on May 10, 2016

Tara Talks: Healing Self-Doubt – Tara Brach

This short clip draws on an archetypal story from the life of the Buddha, and guides us in working with self-doubt.


Published on Apr 24, 2016

Deepak Chopra – How to find your life purpose

His Holiness the Dalai Lama provides intimate details on an advanced meditation practice called Dzogchen using a visionary poem by the 19th-century saint Patrul Rinpoche, author of the Buddhist classic Words of My Perfect Teacher.

The Dalai Lama deftly connects how training the mind in compassion for other beings is directly related to—and in fact a prerequisite for—the very pinnacle of Buddhist meditation. He presents his understanding, confirmed again and again over millennia, that the cultivation of both compassion and wisdom is absolutely critical to progress in meditation and goes into great depth on how this can be accomplished.

While accessible to a beginner, he leads the reader in very fine detail on how to identify innermost awareness—who we really are—how to maintain contact with this awareness, and how to release oneself from the endless stream of our thoughts to let this awareness, always present, become consistently apparent.

HIS HOLINESS THE FOURTEENTH DALAI LAMA
is considered the foremost Buddhist leader of our time. The exiled head of the Tibetan people, he is a Nobel Peace Laureate, a Congressional Gold Medal recipient, and a remarkable teacher and scholar who has authored over one hundred books. JEFFREY HOPKINS is Founder and President of the UMA Institute for Tibetan Studies. He is Professor Emeritus of Tibetan Buddhist Studies at the University of Virginia, where he taught Tibetan Buddhist Studies and Tibetan language for thirty-two years from 1973. He served as His Holiness the Dalai Lama’s chief interpreter into English on lecture tours for ten years, 1979-1989, and has translated and edited fifteen books from oral teachings by His Holiness the Dalai Lama. He has also published numerous translations of important Buddhist texts that represent the diversity of views found in Tibetan Buddhism.

LOOK INSIDE

Dalai Lama Talk : Awareness of Peace, Mindfulness And Wellbeing

Dalai Lama Talk: Awareness of Peace, Mindfulness and Wellbeing

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama Emphasizes his belief that the entire concept of war is based on the “…us and them…” or “…we and they…” way of thinking.
The wars of the last century stem from a “…self-centered attitude…”

His holiness talks frankly about meeting world leaders and discussing the reasons and thinking behind nations going to war. When meeting a world leader for the first time”…not mentioning any names…” the first visit is very stand off-ish, the next time a little closer, the third visit they would talk. And his holiness suggested that this type of gap between people is a contributing factor in the reason nations engage in war.
With emphasis on George Bush and the Iraq – Afghanistan wars. He says he believed the presidents heart was in the right place but his method was wrong. Using force was wrong.

The Dalai Lama also speaks about overcoming tragedy by always trying to see things from different angels. He speaks of losing his country of Tibet and becoming a refugee and how that was “…most fortunate…” because he was able to leave behind a mostly ceremonial life in Tibet and travel, meet new people and speak all over the world. His Holiness say’s that the tragedy of losing Tibet, woke up the Tibetan people.

“..200,000,000 people killed, such immense violence and suffering and including the use of two nuclear bombs once Nagasaki once Hiroshima, I personally visited these areas … men use these things out of strong anger, hatred…” Now the next 100 years will not be free of problems, global warming, population explosion etc. but we have the opportunity for nations to approach these problems with “…peaceful means…” and “…non violence…”.

“…My body speech and mind I dedicate to the wellbeing of others…” – His Holiness the 14Th Dalai Lama.

Delightful and accessible teachings on the path to liberation from a Tibetan Buddhist master who makes the teachings accessible to one and all.

The main themes of the popular Bay Area Buddhist teacher Anam Thubten’s Buddhist teachings are presented here in a concise collection of his teachings. His Tibetan Buddhist wisdom has broad appeal, to the extent that non-Buddhists are often in attendance at his dharma teachings. He focuses on traditional teachings on non-grasping, non-self–but also on happiness, love, and the sacred nature of all things. Reading this book is like being there at one of his inspiring presentations on the basics of the Buddhist path.

Anam Thubten grew up in Tibet and undertook Buddhist training in the Nyingma tradition at an early age. He has been teaching in the West since the 1990s and is the spiritual adviser and Dharma teacher for the Dharmata Foundation.

Beyond Division – Awakening to Sacredness: An Interview with Anam Thubten

Anam Thubten is a teacher in the Nyingma tradition of Tibetan Buddhism. Born in Tibet, he received traditional Buddhist training from a number of teachers at a young age, and was particularly inspired by a hermit called Lama Tsurlo. In the 1990s Anam Thubten went to the US, where he lives today. He is the founder and spiritual adviser of the Dharmata Foundation in California, and is becoming increasingly well known both in the US and abroad. His books in English include “The Magic of Awareness” and “No Self, No Problem.”

This interview was recorded on a visit to Hong Kong in late 2014.

Be inspired by more Buddhist content at our main website, Buddhistdoor: http://www.buddhistdoor.net/

Cape Healing Arts publisher Beth Draper interviewed Catherine Ingram via email recently.

CHA: What do you love the most about being a human being?

CI: I would have to say it is love itself, although love is also what has most broken my heart. Still, better to have loved�and all that. I find as I grow older that it truly doesn’t matter what stuff one has, what one has accomplished, who knows your name, where you have traveled. It really is, as the great ones always said, all about the quality of the love you share with your loved ones. And if one is lucky and is willing to take chances with one’s heart, that is, to let it break as needed, the circle of those one loves widens enormously. This is really the main treasure of life, as far as I can tell.

CHA: When your heart breaks, how do you mend it?

CI: My heart never seems to actually get mended. It keeps breaking wider open and holding more of the sorrow, but, coincidentally, it is also open to more joy and tenderness. Of course, that is how things work. I often say that there is a spectrum of feelings and that the more one is willing to feel on one end, the sorrow, let’s say, the more one is able to feel on the other end, the joy. It is perhaps safe to close off and try not to feel too much suffering, but it is not a rich way to live. It cuts off all passion and beauty as well.

CHA: In a society that barely acknowledges grief and grieving-in fact, often squelches it-how do you allow yourself to experience deep sorrow?

CI: I live among the brokenhearted. They allow it.

CHA: Of the seven qualities of awakened awareness that you discuss in your book, which one is the trickiest for you to remember-and why?

CI: There are several that I seem to skip over or remember last on the list-discernment, embodiment, genuineness. The ones I seem to remember most easily are silence, tenderness, wonder, and delight. Maybe because those are the most fun.

CHA: In your book, you describe discernment as a clarity of perception. The ability to clearly see what is instead of what or how we would like things to be. How do you reconcile “passion, focus, and intensity” with your excellent advice to “have a light relationship with your preferences?”

CI: It is a sense that things are blowing very quickly through one’s soul, if you will. Feelings, emotions, passion, pain-all profoundly felt and released as quickly as possible. It is the experience of life in present awareness without resistance but also without clutching to a particular form or experience. Naturally, we have preferences. It is all a matter of how much we suffer when we don’t get what we want or when something or someone that we wanted leaves us. It is good to imagine one’s awareness as an open sky through which all passes and to “kiss the joy as it flies” as Blake said.

CHA: I see that your passion and focus lie with this process of being in present awareness.

CI: Yes, it is another way of saying that one lives in reality-for in actuality, the present is the only time in which we exist, which is what makes it feel so much more alive than the trance-like dreams of past and future taking place in imagination.

CHA: How do you allow feelings of anger and jealousy to blow through you? Many of us were taught that these are “negative” feelings, especially when we feel them in regard to people we love.

CI: We have to learn to admit that negative feelings are a common experience, no matter how good we are trying to be or what spiritual practices we have engaged in. Jealousy, anger, annoyance, irritation, pettiness-they all visit with unfortunate regularity. But the trick is not to take them personally or to be shocked by them. And then they have no power over you. The thought of jealousy that arises and fades in a few moments is not a problem. The jealous thought that Is denied and twisted into some kind of justification due to one’s own discomfort can often turn into unkind words and actions directed at the object of one’s jealousy. In these ways, the refusal to admit to negative thoughts can create all kinds of problems, as we so often see in spiritual leaders and masters who insinuate or even say that they are enlightened but whose behavior belies petty and desperate motivations involving sex, money, or power. I prefer to hang out with what Alan Watts called “divine rascals”-those who know both their divinity and their rascality.

CHA: Fabulous! What would you like to share most right now with our readers?

CI: The thing I seem to most emphasize in Dharma Dialogues-and would say to your readers-is to not postpone living your life. There is a subtle way that we have of waiting for something to come or waiting to get rid of something we have (even in the case of extra body weight, for instance) and thinking that our real life will begin then. Your real life is happening now, and there is no guarantee for any of us how long that life will be. As we let ourselves live fully in present awareness, it is as though we are experiencing life at last. We are no longer waiting.

Since 1992, Catherine Ingram has led Dharma Dialogues, public events of inquiry into the nature of awareness and the possibility of living in awakened intelligence. She is the president of Living Dharma, an educational nonprofit organization dedicated to inquiry and service with offices in Portland, Oregon, and Los Angeles, CA. Catherine also leads numerous silent retreats each year and is coming to Cape Cod this June.
Source: Catherine Ingram

Learn the seven ways to tap into a state of pure joy, at any time, with the spiritual teacher Catherine Ingram. When we deeply relax, free from the stories the past, present and future, a great passion for life emerges, along with an awakened intelligence. This passionate presence is innate; it is a universal intelligence that transcends biological abilities and educational backgrounds.

In this book, spiritual teacher and writer Catherine Ingram offers seven ways to awaken the passionate presence that is in all of us. Each chapter describes one of the seven primary qualities of awakened intelligence. These qualities are based on her observations over years of working with thousands of people in silent retreats and public interactive events called Dharma Dialogues. The seven aspects – tenderness, discernment, authenticity, embodiment, delight, wonder and silence – naturally and consistently emerge as a result of deep relaxation and lead us easily to our passionate presence.

Catherine Ingram is a renowned dharma teacher with communities serving several thousand students in the U.S., Europe, and Australia. Since 1992, she has led Dharma Dialogues (www.dharmadialogues.org), which are public events of inquiry into the nature of awakened awareness and its benefits in life. She is the founder and president of Living Dharma, an educational nonprofit organization dedicated to inquiry and service.

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Catherine Ingram – ‘Practical Wisdom In Precarious Times’ – Interview by Renate McNay

Catherine Ingram – ‘Practical Wisdom In Precarious Times’ – Interview by Renate McNay

Catherine Ingram is an International Dharma teacher and Author of three books: “Passionate Presence”, “A Crack in Everything” and “In the Footsteps of Gandhi”. Catherine says, “Our sanctuary is not in finding security in this world. Security in the things and circumstances of the world is an illusion. Our sanctuary is in our ability to relax into ‘Present Awareness’ and passionately celebrate beauty, to show up in love for our friends and families, to live lightly on this earth, and to experience wonder.”

Catherine Ingram – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Catherine Ingram is an international dharma teacher with communities in the U.S., Europe, and Australia. Since 1992 she has led Dharma Dialogues, which are public events that focus on directing awareness toward greater wellbeing in an ethical and happy life. Catherine also leads numerous silent retreats each year in conjunction with Dharma Dialogues. She is president of Living Dharma, an educational non-profit organization founded in 1995.

Catherine has been the subject of numerous print, television, and radio interviews and is included in several anthologies about teachers in the west.

A former journalist specializing in issues of consciousness and activism, Catherine Ingram is the author of two books of nonfiction, which are published in numerous languages: In the Footsteps of Gandhi: Conversations with Spiritual Social Activists (Parallax Press, 1990) and Passionate Presence: Seven Qualities of Awakened Awareness (Penguin Putnam, 2003); and one novel, A Crack in Everything (Diamond Books, 2006). Over a fifteen-year period beginning in 1982, Catherine published approximately 100 articles on issues of consciousness and activism and served on the editorial staffs of New Age Journal, East West Journal, and Yoga Journal. For four years she wrote the Life Advice column for Alternatives Magazine based in Oregon.

For the past thirty five years, Catherine has helped organize and direct institutions dedicated to meditation and self-inquiry and, more recently, human and animal rights. She is a co-founder of Insight Meditation Society in Barre, Massachusetts (1976). She also co-founded the Unrepresented Nations and Peoples Organization (UNPO) in The Hague, Netherlands (1991) and is a member of the Committee of 100 for Tibet. For six years (1988-1994), Catherine also served as a board director for The Burma Project, dedicated to raising international awareness about the struggle for democracy in Burma. She is currently serving on the board of Global Animal Foundation, which works on behalf of the world’s animals.

Her work provides a context in which to consider life experiences—work, romance, creativity, loss, and death—through the calm and simple quiet of the heart.

catherineingram.com

Interview Recorded 9/7/2013

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