Living Gently On The Earth ~ Anodea Judith, Ph.D.

An interview with Anodea Judith, Ph.D.: We are entering a time when every environmental system on the planet is stressed. Some people fear that we won’t make it as a species. Others are in denial about the gravity of our situation.

How do you see our species and its relationship to the Earth?

I look at the current state of our global situation through the long view of evolutionary history. I see the progression of the human story as corresponding to developmental stages of childhood, from our primal infancy, to the cradle of civilization, through 5000 years of sibling rivalry, to emerge in the present time in the tumultuous throes of adolescence. This means we are undergoing an rite of passage that will take us into our young adulthood.

Children are dependent, adolescents are independent, and adults are inter-dependent. So our adulthood means that we come to an understanding of our interdependent partnership with Nature. In this mature relationship we are neither hapless victims nor dominators, but co-creators with the natural world.

If we are entering a rite of passage, who is initiating us?

The problems in our world can be seen as the initiating factors that are forcing us to change in order to survive: global warming, ecological destruction, social injustice, warfare, terrorism, peak oil, natural disasters, epidemic disease – the entire litany of modern challenges are actually part of our initiation rite. These problems are the change agents or evolutionary drivers that push us into a new way of living on this planet. Like many initiations, the challenge is to transform or die. This is the challenge that faces us as a species. Our current way of life will bring death to countless species and ecosystems, including a great many humans.

That’s a pretty heavy statement. Is it really that bleak?

Yes, and no. Yes, in the sense that we cannot continue indefinitely in the direction we are now going – with our whole economy based on consumption and unacknowledged waste, without putting anything back. As population expands, this practice becomes ever more pronounced. The problems we see now: climate change, pollution, illness and poverty – will only increase. Right now 20% of the world’s population lacks access to safe drinking water. If we do not change our ways, that figure could go up to two-thirds of the world populaton by 2025. If global warming continues, up to 50 million Americans could become environmental refugees, and that is small compared to the impact in the rest of the world.

And no, it’s not that bleak because society is already beginning to turn things around. We are developing alternatives to fossil fuels, such as wind and solar, that provide more sustainable sources, and these sources could provide all our needs if we learn to conserve. We are finally creating hybrid cars that get better gas mileage, and that technology is capable of even more. Lester Brown of Worldwatch Institute claims that hybrids could lower our use of fossil fuels by 85% if they were used widely enough.

We are learning about organic farming with a higher demand placed on natural foods and buying locally, such as shopping at farmer’s markets, which is one of the fastest growing commercial markets in the U.S. There is a huge outcry about global warming now, thanks to Al Gore’s latest movie, and that will galvanize global cooperation like nothing ever has, because we will have a common “problem” that isn’t an enemy to kill, but a situation to solve.

Furthermore, for two-thirds of the cost of the Iraq War, most of the major environmental problems in the world could be solved: soil depletion, deforestation, water pollution, ozone, world hunger, air pollution. We have the technology, and we obviously have the money, we just don’t the political will – or quite enough collective will – to make it happen.

How did we get to such a place where we came to live so alienated from Nature?

If we look at the story of our kind as a progression from birth to adulthood, our beginnings emerged from the primal womb of the natural world. In our earliest infancy, Nature was our universal mother, who nourished us on her abundant breast. As we grew up through our childhood, we rebelled against Nature – asserting our own independence in every way that we could. All worship of the “mother” and the Pagan Nature deities was strictly forbidden in Christian times, along with denigrating the body and earth as “unclean.”

Through science we came to understand Nature, not as a living field in which we were embedded, but as an inanimate “it” that we could control and exploit. That understanding led to our Industrial Revolution and the technology that has both solved and created many problems in our world today. Our initial rebellion from Mother Nature has now led to a dissociation which has brought us up against the perils of human nature.

So from the primal thesis of the natural world, to its antithesis in the “man-made” world, we are now ready for a new and higher synthesis of the two – a balanced relationship of mutual interdependence. This can create a beautiful and sustainable world in which our technology is in harmony with rather than at odds against the natural world. It is not that technology is bad – it has given us the immeasurable gifts – it’s just that it is not in alignment with the natural world. Once that happens, there’s no limit to what we can achieve. But without that alignment, Nature will pose the limits, and we are coming up against them now.

I see our initiation as moving from an adolescent age whose ruling principle is the love of power to a more mature and sustainable civilization organized by the power of love. The imperial model that society currently holds is one of domination, and the social organization of this power is based on a pyramid, with one man on top and power trickling down to a mass of slaves. The model of the heart is one of relationship, where every aspect of the living web is regarded as equally sacred. The new paradigm is ruled by an ecosystem rather than an egosystem, by a web of connection rather than a chain of command. And even as we cover the earth with the internet, the biosphere is still the most complex and elegant web of connection we have on this planet – something that pre-dated humans by billions of years.

What can the average person, who is embedded in this culture, do to live in greater harmony with the Earth?

Each of us has a choice in every moment to honor our relationship with the Earth. We have this choice in what we buy, what we eat, what we wear, where we live, and how we drive. This choice is simultaneously personal and political.

On a personal level, there are many ways to minimize the distance between yourself and the natural world. Choose food with less packaging, less chemical processing, and less trucking. (The average item in a grocery store travels over a thousand miles to get there).

Find ways to experience Nature directly so as to reset the dials on your nervous system, which were, after all, designed to respond to the colors, smells, and visions of the natural world. This can be done by taking trips to the wilderness, riding your bike, or walking whenever possible. This is especially important for children, who now spend most of their time indoors, without developing this important relationship.

You can conserve energy (and money) by using energy efficient light bulbs, and turning out the lights diligently when they’re not needed. In terms of carbon emissions, buy a hybrid car if you can afford it. If not, go on the web and see how you can offset your carbon imprint by making a donation to organizations that are fighting global warming. (see http://www.carbonfund.org)

On a more political level, there are countless organizations that have arisen to protect the environment. (for a good listing go to: http://www.webdirectory.com or http://www.ecologicalinternet.org.) Offer your support to the organizations that are already doing the work. Many of them work on a shoestring budget with volunteer labor. Give them money or volunteer your time or help them get their message out. See what needs protection in your own local area. You can have your long distance phone bills go through Working Assets, which donates part of its money to social and environmental organizations.

Make a point to find out about your politicians’ voting records, and support those candidates that seem to understand what’s at stake. The League of Conservation Voters has a scorecard you can look up on the Internet for the voting records of your representatives.

Most important is that we speak to everyone we can and help them to wake up to both the perils and the possibilities of our situation. Ask stores and restaurants if they recycle. Complain about excess packaging and bring your own bags to the market. Tell your grocery stores you want more organic food. Write your representatives. Talk to your neighbors and to those you meet on buses and trains. Call into talk shows, write letters to the editor of your local paper. Become informed, and then share that information widely.

Do you see Gaia as a living being, and if so what are the implications of such a belief?

I have always seen the Earth and its biosphere as one indivisible whole that is living and sentient. The entire planet has a consciousness that is evolving, and we are part of that evolution. This is supported by science in the way the planet regulates temperature, ocean salinity, and oxygen balance in a highly complex system. This is hard for many people to comprehend in the same way that fleas do not know they are on an elephant.

The first implication of this is that we are all cells of one body, which supports the idea that we are all connected, or all one. But even more, if we view this living being as having an intelligence – just the way our bodies have an intelligence that knows how to heal, digest, and breathe—then we can be guided by that intelligence in all that we do – as part of Gaia, not separate from the Earth. We can regard nature as a very sentient “thou,” that is literally our collective body. We know that if the body is sick, our emotional and mental states suffer as well. Likewise, if the environment is afflicted, then the health of our whole society suffers.

If we attribute such consciousness to our environment, we are more likely to see it as sacred. It becomes something that gives us guidance and spiritual sustenance, in the same way that churches do for many people. A redwood grove is the perfect cathedral for me!Earlier you indicated that when we reach a level of maturity as a species we will live in “balanced partnership with Nature”. What do you think about the notion that we are walking hand-in-hand with the planet down a path that will lead ultimately to the survival of the planet and the distinction of the human species among others? That, in fact, once we are gone, Gaia will simply evolve other forms of life. That it’s not about saving the planet, it’s about saving ourselves.

It’s very true that Gaia can survive without humans but humans cannot survive without a functioning biosphere. But I don’t see it as an either/or situation where we save the planet or ourselves, but that we come to an understanding that they are inseparably intertwined. To do environmental work merely for the purpose of saving ourselves is to miss the point that we are part of a grand experiment in co-evolution, and we have just gotten to the point in that evolution where we can be aware of it and enter the relationship consciously.

It is through our species that Gaia could see Herself – through the first moon landing that beamed back a picture of the Earth floating in space. This was a monumental evolutionary moment in the progression from cooling lava 5 billion years ago to the first self-reflective consciousness. We certainly could go the way of the dinosaurs and become extinct, and Gaia would recover with new life forms to follow. If it took 10,000 years to recover from humans, that’s nothing in geologic time.

Humans are just the latest model in the evolutionary experiment, but not the last. However, we are the first species capable of having such a huge impact on the planet, but even more important, we are the first species capable of understanding that impact and consciously doing something about it. And if we can get that lesson and act accordingly, we just may get to stick around and see what happens!


Judith, Ph.D. is worldwide workshop presenter, and the author of many books. Her latest, “WAKING THE GLOBAL HEART: HUMANITY’S RITE OF PASSAGE FROM THE LOVE OF POWER TO THE POWER OF LOVE”. Her previous works in include: WHEELS OF LIFE, EASTERN BODY-WESTERN MIND, and the award winning video, THE ILLUMINATED CHAKRAS.
Source: AWAKEN

The Future of Human Experience : Visionary Thinkers on the Science of Consciousness ~J. Zohara Meyerhoff Hieronimus [ Updated Oct 15, 2016 ]

Explores the future predictions of cutting-edge scientists, spiritual teachers, and other visionaries and how we can affect the future

• Shares insights from the author’s discussions with Larry Dossey, Dr. Mehmet Oz, Graham Hancock, Raymond Moody, Rupert Sheldrake, Zecharia Sitchin, Gay Bradshaw, Candace Pert, and many others

• Examines what these visionary thinkers foresee for humanity based on current trends in medicine, science, agriculture, history, and other disciplines

• Reveals how consciousness affects evolution and Earth’s future

For almost three decades Zohara Hieronimus has interviewed spiritual teachers, cutting-edge scientists, ancient wisdom keepers, laboratory-tested psychics, and other visionaries on their predictions for the near and far future. While the methods they use are significantly diverse, the similarities in their forecasts are striking. And, as Hieronimus reveals, one common theme resonates through them all: the power of human consciousness.

Sharing insights from her discussions with Larry Dossey, Dr. Mehmet Oz, Graham Hancock, Raymond Moody, Rupert Sheldrake, Zecharia Sitchin, Gay Bradshaw, Candace Pert, and many others, Hieronimus explores what these visionary thinkers foresee for humanity based on current trends in medicine, science, agriculture, Earth history, robotics, and spirituality. She examines natural, extraterrestrial, and man-made events that dramatically altered humanity’s course in the past or might in the future, revealing a recurring cycle of catastrophic Earth changes and rebirths of civilization over billions of years. The author explains that, as part of the energetic expression of Divinity, we can influence the impact of Earth changes through our actions and intentions. She shows that the consciousness of humanity has the power to affect evolution, enact healing on personal and global levels, and alter even natural systems such as the weather.

By studying predictions across a broad range of disciplines–from nano-technology to plant intelligence–from today’s great minds and from ancient spiritual traditions, Hieronimus shows that we can significantly improve the long-term welfare of the Earth by unfolding our nonlocal consciousness, adopting a reverent attitude toward all life, and realizing how we do things is as vital as what we do.


J.Zohara Meyerhoff Hieronimus is an award winning radio broadcaster, author, social justice and environmental activist, and pioneer in Holistic Health Care.

Zoh is a futurist and a well known leader in holistic and integrative health care as Founder of the Ruscombe Mansion Community Health Center. Zohara is well known for her participation in consciousness studies, social and environmental causes and is a broadcasting personality as host of the syndicated Future Talk, Clearview Radio, and the Zoh Show. Zohara is also a teacher of the Alef-Beit (Hebrew alphabet), and author of Kabbalistic Teachings of the Female Prophets, The Seven Holy Women of Ancient Israel, Inner Traditions International, June 2008 and Sanctuary of the Divine Presence, Hebraic Rituals of Inititation and Illumination, Inner Traditions, 2012. As well, Zohara practices Kabbalistic Life Path Analysis.

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Earth Changes & The Power Of Consciousness – Zohara Hieronimus

Environmental activist and pioneer, Zohara Hieronimus joins Dr. Rita Louise on Just Energy Radio where she discusses the state of the world today and what futurists see as where we are heading in the future. She also delves into what we can do to bring about the future we want to experience.

Earth Calling: A Climate Change Handbook for the 21st Century (Sacred Activism) by Ellen Gunter (Author), Ted Carter (Author), Caroline Myss (Foreword)


Our earliest mythologies tell us we all start as a little bit of dirt. These stories carry a profound message: each of us is born with a deep and abiding connection to the earth, one that many of us have lost touch with. The Silent Spring for today’s environmental activists, this book offers an invitation to reestablish our relationship with nature to repair our damaged environment.

Chapter 1 examines the threats to the planet’s health through the lens of the human energy system known as the chakras, describing how the broken first chakra relates to our disconnection from our biosphere.

Chapter 2 shows how our current environmental crises–global warming, climate change, dwindling water resources, natural disasters such as wildfires and hurricanes–represent severe manifestations of our disconnection from the earth.

Chapter 3 describes how the preponderance of oil in our culture–especially agribusiness–compounds this disconnection, from our dependence on other countries for our energy, to current issues of oil depletion, peak oil, and fracking, to the dumbing down of our agricultural polyculture.

Chapter 4 explains how the most basic building blocks of our nourishment–seeds–are being compromised with a loss of biodiversity and rise of GMOs, and how that adversely affects the farmers whose sacred connection to the land has in many cases been severed.

Chapter 5 describes the ways in which we as individuals can begin to wake up to climate activism as a spiritual practice. This chapter includes specific activities that you can use to implement change and heal your own connection to the earth. By learning and practicing ritual and understanding the earth’s rhythms and seasonal rites of passage, each of us can find unique ways to heal our own connections and help others heal theirs.

Chapter 6 brings to life Goethe’s wisdom: “Knowing isn’t enough; neither is being willing. We must do,” by providing strategies and resources for exploring how each of us can find our own Earth Calling, then anchoring that calling with the only force that ignites change: Action.

ELLEN GUNTER is a climate activist who lectures, delivers Al Gore’s slideshow on climate change, and writes about the connections between spirituality and the environment. TED CARTER has been designing earth-centric landscapes along the northeast coast for more than thirty years. His award-winning work has been featured in local and national publications. The authors live in Oak Park, IL/Buxton, ME

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Environment crisis: Breaking free from conditioning – Ellen Gunter

Ellen Gunter is a journalist, spiritual director and co-author of Reunion: How we heal our broken connection to the earth. An advocate of ecological concerns since reading Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring as a teen, her deep concern about the health of the earth has remained a constant in her political and social life. Reunion explores the interconnectedness of the environment with our mental, physical and spiritual health and details how each of us can begin to rediscover our connection to our planet through meaningful exercises and a willingness to look more deeply at what surrounds and calls to us. http://ellengunter.com/

You Can Change the World: The Global Citizen’s Handbook for Living on Planet Earth by Ervin Laszlo (Author), Mikhail Gorbachev (Introduction), Paulo Coelho (Afterword),

You Can Change the World: The Global Citizen’s Handbook for Living on Planet Earth should be required reading for anyone who cares about the future of the planet. Written by renowned scientist, futurist and Club of Budapest founder Ervin Laszlo, You Can Change the World answers two pertinent questions-first, what is at the root of all the conflict and crisis in today’s world? And second, what can actually be done to move toward a world where we can live in peace, without marginalizing and killing each other and destroying the environment?

A handbook that urges readers to become global citizens who aspire to live responsibly on this precious but highly exploited and crisis-prone planet, You Can Change the World provides a simple and basic message: in today’s world it is neither wealth nor power, nor the control of territory and technology that make the crucial difference. How we think and act shapes our present and decides our future.

Dr. Laszlo is generally recognized as the founder of systems philosophy and general evolution theory. His work in recent years has centered on the formulation and development of the “Akasha Paradigm,” the new conception of cosmos, life and consciousness emerging at the forefront of the contemporary sciences. He serves as President of the Club of Budapest, Chairman of the Ervin Laszlo Center for Advanced Study, Chancellor of the Giordano Bruno New-Paradigm University, and Editor of World Futures: The Journal of New Paradigm Research.

He is recipient of the highest degree in philosophy and human sciences from the Sorbonne, the University of Paris, as well as of the coveted Artist Diploma of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Budapest. Additional prizes and awards include four honorary doctorates.

His appointments have included research grants at Yale and Princeton Universities, professorships for philosophy, systems sciences, and future sciences at the Universities of Houston, Portland State, and Indiana, as well as Northwestern University and the State University of New York. His career also included guest professorships at various universities in Europe and the Far East. In addition, he worked as program director for the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). In 1999 he was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Canadian International Institute of Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics.

For many years he has served as president of The Club of Budapest, which he founded. He is an advisor to the UNESCO Director General, ambassador of the International Delphic Council, member of both the International Academy of Science, World Academy of Arts and Science, and the International Academy of Philosophy.

Twice nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize (2004, 2005), he got Goi Peace prize (2001). He has authored more than 70 books, which have been translated into twenty languages, and has published in excess of four hundred articles and research papers, including six volumes of piano recordings.

Ervin Laszlo on The Future of Our World

Dr. Ervin Laszlo, is a world-renowned philosopher of science, systems theorist and integral theorist as well as a classical pianist. A true Renaissance man and citizen of the world, he is the author of over 80 books translated into 21 languages. In this interview we discuss the very timely book he edited with Allan Combs called Thomas Berry, Dreamer of the Earth — The Spiritual Ecology of the Father of Environmentalism. It contains 10 essays by eminent philosophers, thinkers, and scientists that focus on the environmental and social crises facing humanity and the urgent need for a massive paradigm shift.
Read about this book and others at http://www.ncreview.com/

Pope Francis’ Encyclical: Hearing the Cry of the Earth

By Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

The Earth “now cries out to us because of the harm we have inflicted on her.” So begins Pope Francis in his powerful and long-awaited encyclical on ecology. “The earth herself, burdened and laid waste, is among the most abandoned and maltreated of our poor.”

Pope Francis chose to be called after a saint for whom love for all of God’s creation was central to his life, and all creatures were his brothers and sisters. Speaking in the voice of this saint “who loved and protects creation,” he calls for a moral response to prevent the “unprecedented destruction of the ecosystem,”–that we urgently need to recognize the consequences of, and changes required in our way of life. He reflects on our abuse, the violence creating “the symptoms of illness that we see in the Earth, the water, the air and in living things.” And describing how climate change most adversely affects the poor, he combines ecological and social justice, that we “hear both the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.”

The state of the Earth is our most pressing concern. Our present ecological crisis is the greatest man-made disaster this planet has ever faced: the signs of global imbalance, climate change, and species depletion are all around us. The monster of materialism is ravaging the Earth, its rapacious greed destroying the ecosystem, the fragile web of life that supports and nourishes all of life’s myriad creatures. We are part of a world of wonder and beauty which we are systematically sacrificing to feed our ever-increasing desires. We need to remember the simple wonder of the natural world around us, which St. Francis celebrated in his beautiful Canticle of Brother Sun:

Praised be You, my Lord, through Sister Mother Earth,
who sustains us and governs us and who produces
varied fruits with colored flowers and herbs.

Yesterday, when I went to my small vegetable patch to pick a few zucchinis for supper, I was once again amazed at the Earth’s generosity, how one plant could give so many vegetables. I had to look carefully under the spreading leaves to discover a zucchini unexpectedly growing almost too large. This is the sacred life that sustains us, part of the creation we desperately need to “love and protect,” just as it loves and protects us.

A central but rarely addressed aspect of this crisis is our forgetfulness of the sacred nature of creation, and how this affects our relationship to the environment. Pope Francis speaks of the pressing need to articulate a spiritual response to this ecological crisis and to “feel intimately united with all that exists.” Today’s world is dominated by a divisiveness that encourages exploitation and greed, and we need to return to a sense of wholeness, reflecting the living unity of all of creation and its myriad inhabitants.

The Earth needs both physical and spiritual attention and awareness, our acts and prayers, our hands and hearts. Life is a self-sustaining organic whole of which we are a part, and once we reconnect with this whole we can find a different way to live–one that is not based upon a need for continual distraction and the illusions of material fulfillment, but rather a way to live that is sustaining for the whole.

Each in our own way we can turn away from the patterns of consumerism that drain our money and our life energy. We can aspire to live a simpler life, learning how to live in a more sustainable way, and not be drawn into unnecessary materialism–filling our life with love and care rather than “stuff.” A simple meal of vegetables and grains cooked with love and attention can nourish our body and soul.

But, to speak more with the voice of St. Francis, the Earth also needs our prayers, our spiritual attention. Many of us know the effectiveness of prayers for others, how healing and help is given, even in the most unexpected ways. It can be helpful first to acknowledge that the Earth is not “unfeeling matter,” but a living being that has given us life. And then we can “hear its cry,” sense its suffering: the physical suffering we see in the dying species and polluted waters–the deeper suffering of our collective disregard for its sacred nature.

Pope Francis ends his encyclical with two prayers for our Earth. There is also the simple prayer of placing the world as a living being within our hearts when we inwardly offer our self to the Divine. In this prayer we remember the sorrow and suffering of the Earth in our hearts, and ask that that the world be remembered, that divine love and mercy flow where it is needed; that even though we continue to treat the world so badly, divine grace will help us and help the world–help to bring the Earth back into balance. We need to remember that the power of the Divine is more than that of all the global corporations that continue to make the world a wasteland, even more than the global forces of consumerism that demand the life-blood of the planet. We pray that the Divine of which we are all a part can redeem and heal this beautiful and suffering world.

Sometimes it is easier to pray when we feel the earth in our hands, when we work in the garden tending our flowers or vegetables. Or when we cook, preparing the vegetables that the Earth has given us, mixing in the herbs and spices that give us pleasure. There are many ways to pray, and we will each find our own way of tending the Earth within our own hearts. Just as the song of St. Francis calls us to praise the Earth, and to praise God “through all your creatures.”

As Pope Francis’s message reminds us, we each need to be the person who “loves and protects creation,” who remembers its sacred nature. We need to bring this song of love into our hearts and hands. Through our love for the Earth we can honor the call to climate action that comes from all faiths and from the single voice that is within all of humanity. We are all part of one living being we call the Earth and it desperately needs our love and attention.

Pope Francis urges people to combat climate change

Published on Jun 18, 2015

Carl Apple of the Catholic Diocese of Grand Rapids talks about Pope Francis’ recent stance on climate change. (June 18, 2015)

Living Earth Devotional 365 Green Practices for Sacred Connection By: Clea Danaan

Tune in to nature, care for the sacred earth, and grow spiritually with 365 eco-friendly activities for deepening your connection with nature. Living Earth Devotional offers practical, soul-centered tasks, including meditations, craft projects, gardening and outdoor activities, journaling prompts, and more. Following the Wheel of the Year, this day-by-day guide will help you tune in to the energies of the changing seasons and build a greater appreciation for the earth’s beauty, power, and wisdom. Reduce your carbon footprint, recharge your creativity and intuition, and cultivate a connection with the world that inspires spiritual growth and personal transformation.

Clea Danaan (Colorado) has been gardening organically for over twenty years. Her articles on ecology and spirituality have appeared in SageWoman, Witches & Pagans, GreenSpirit, and Organic Family magazines. She is the author of Sacred Land, Voices of the Earth, Living Earth Devotional, and The Way of the Hen. Her background in Reiki, expressive arts therapies, outdoor education, and somatic psychology inform her integrated and ecumenical writings. Visit her online at http://www.CleaDanaan.com.

Browse Here

Earth Devotional offers practical, soul-centered tasks, including meditations, craft projects, gardening and outdoor activities, journal exercises, and more. Following the Wheel of the Year, this day-by-day guide will help you tune in to the energies of the changing seasons and build a greater appreciation for the earth’s beauty, power, and wisdom. Reduce your carbon footprint, recharge your creativity and intuition, and cultivate a connection with the earth that inspires spiritual growth and personal transformation.

Global Citizen 2015 Earth Day Live Stream

Started on Apr 18, 2015

On April 18th artists, world leaders, and over 250,000 citizens are joining together at the National Mall to protect the planet and its people.

Rebirth, Miracles, and Magic ~ Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee Ph.D.

Amidst headlines of terrorists and other news of a global darkness, a quiet miracle is once again taking place. While blizzards batter the North East, spring comes here in Northern California–that magical moment when buds break open, when bulbs become shoots that become flowers, and color and fragrance return to a world made grey by winter. Trees blossom, magnolias flower purple and white. One can sense the pulse of the earth, and cannot help but feel the joy of life reawakening. Nature beckons us to be present at this moment when life begins again.

In the Christian story the moment of rebirth will come two months later, when in the miracle of the empty tomb Mary mistakes the risen Christ for a gardener, until he says those poignant words, “Woman why weepest thou?” This resurrection takes place every year at Easter, but it is not just a cyclical happening. Christ’s transformation symbolizes the mysterious moment when the eternal and temporal meet, when the Divine and human merge together. This is the transformation that can happen to each of us, when we reconnect and live the eternal dimension of our own soul, when we reawaken. Like the joy in springtime, it is always a miracle. And it is the deepest promise of being human.

The stories of the soul are all around us, how from the darkness life returns. It is simple and magical, nourishing us with the mystery of what it really means to be alive, to be awake. In today’s world dominated by the rational mind, by the apparent wonders of technology and science, we often forget this more primal wonder. We overlook our need for real magic. Without knowing it we do not welcome spring, we are not there at the empty tomb. Often as a culture we do not even recognize the lack of color in our lives, the lack of the soul’s fragrance.

And as our world spins out of balance, becoming more and more divisive, there is the danger that we will remain in the darkening world of winter without even realizing it. Caught in our culture’s dreams of materialism, we do not notice the magic we are missing. Just as we are destroying the fragile beauty of the outer world, so we are losing its inner mystery. But even if we do not feel the grief, we are all part of this global story of ecological devastation, of species that will never again be reborn in the spring, the trees whose sap will never again flow.

Where can we find the magic we need to free ourself from this self-destructive spell of consumerism, this soul-destroying pursuit of distractions? Magic is always present, just as the Divine is always present. It is there in the leaf opening, in the beating of the hummingbird’s wings. It is in the garden sparrows that everyday crowd around the bird feeder outside my window–such an ordinary miracle that I love it all the more. It is in the moment when the Divine unveils Itself and whispers or at times shouts to us. Sometimes, like for Mary, it becomes visible in our moment of grief, when the tears fall and our heart aches.

Sadly we only talk to ourselves. We no longer listen to the Earth or to life itself. As Thomas Berry says, “We have broken the great conversation.” But if we have courage and humility, if we kneel down close to the earth, we may hear how our whole world is crying, calling to those who are awake enough to hear it, strong enough to bear its grief. It is calling for us to work together, to bring the light of our own divinity, our compassion and caring, into the marketplace of life, to counter the pull of greed and exploitation.

More than any ideas of solving our problems or planning for the future, we need the power of magic–the ancient magic of the Earth, of its soul as well as its soil. And we need the miracle of love that is within our heart. Together we may be able to break this spell that is making a wasteland of our world. In cooperation with the Earth and all of its inhabitants we can weave the threads of a new story, which is also an old story. It is the most ancient story of the Earth and also the story of our own soul: the story of life regenerating itself, being born anew.

View Here on his book, ” Darkening of the Light: Witnessing the End of an Era

6. Nature Is Speaking – Robert Redford is The Redwood | 7. Nature Is Speaking – Edward Norton is The Soil | Conservation International (CI)

Nature Is Speaking – Edward Norton is The Soil | Conservation International (CI)

3. Nature Is Speaking – Penélope Cruz is Water 4. Nature Is Speaking – Kevin Spacey is The Rainforest 5.Nature Is Speaking – Lupita Nyong’o is Flower

Nature Is Speaking – Penélope Cruz is Water

Nature Is Speaking – Kevin Spacey is The Rainforest

Nature Is Speaking – Lupita Nyong’o is Flower | Conservation International (CI)

1. Nature Is Speaking – Julia Roberts is Mother Nature 2. Nature Is Speaking – Harrison Ford is The Ocean


Published on Oct 5, 2014
Julia Roberts, Harrison Ford, Kevin Spacey, Edward Norton, Penélope Cruz, Robert Redford and Ian Somerhalder all join forces to give nature a voice.
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Nature Is Speaking – Harrison Ford is The Ocean | Conservation International (CI)

Earth’s Crisis: On the Edge of the Roof ~ Tara Brach


Published on Sep 18, 2014
Earth’s Crisis: On the Edge of the Roof (9/17/2014) ~ This talk views the ecological dis-ease of our planet through the lens of our evolutionary unfolding. We explore the egoic trance that has precipitated the destruction of our environment, and the inner practices of presence that enable us to respond from love and wisdom.

The Great Unspoken Tragedy of the Present Time – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Excerpted from the talk ‘Spiritual Ecology’ given at the Mercy Center in Burlingame, CA on December 3, 2011.

Crimes Against Humanity: A1h1w2 by Joyce a Kovelman

A pandemic begins on Antarctica, rapidly infecting all of Earth’s oceans and threatening the existence of planetary life. The U.S. Military creates a scientific team whose ‘mission impossible’ is to identify the pathogen and end the pandemic. When a violent crime spree starts to spiral out of control, a few courageous individuals decide to take a stand… will they do so in time? Crimes Against Humanity: A1H1W2 is filled with stories of love, romance, betrayal, and deception. It is a cautionary tale, beseeching humanity to stop desecrating our planetary home, so all earthly life will prevail.


Dr. Kovelman holds two Ph.Ds, one in Anatomy and one in Psychology. She has served for many years as an official ECOSOC Representative to the United Nations on behalf of the Institute of Global Education. A multi-faceted and widely traveled individual, Joyce is also a widow, mother, grandmother, psychologist, and scientist. Dr. Joyce A. Kovelman resides in Chatsworth, California.

Click here to browse inside.

1.Seeds Of Love 2. A March against Monsanto is a March for Life and Freedom ~ Dr.Vandana Shiva


Published on Dec 18, 2013

At a time where mega corporations want to control our food, it is imperative that we stand together to protect our food, the planet and each other.

in this earth
in this earth
in this immaculate field
we shall not plant any seeds
except for compassion
except for love

-Rumi

A March against Monsanto is a March for Life and Freedom – 25th May 2013

Including the Earth in Our Prayers by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Every morning I love to walk early beside the wetlands where I live. It is a time of natural reflection and prayer, a time to be alone with nature and the divine that is present: in the hawk sitting on the telephone lines, the skyline softening and turning golden. And now, as we move towards the winter solstice, the first light comes later, and the darkness seems more potent. In this natural time of darkening my prayer instinctively deepens, as if in response to the loss of light. I sense the energy withdrawing into the earth, and today, the first hard frost, white and brittle, drew me even more towards an inner light.

In my prayer I wonder how it is for the Earth itself, at this time of another darkening, when our materialistic consumer culture depletes so much of the land. We have all heard the news of climate change, pollution, and species extinction. We have seen the pictures of smog-filled streets and clear-cut forests. But how do we sense this in our hearts? Do we dare to acknowledge and feel the wasteland we have created? Do we feel the grief of a world that is dying through our greed and desires? Do we pray for the Earth as we would a sick friend, a cancer sufferer, a dying partner?

More and more we are being reminded that we are not separate from the Earth and its ecosystem—we are all living together, dependent upon each other and our shared environment. As Thich Nhat Hanh writes: “We will survive and thrive together with our Mother Earth or we will not survive at all.”

We are a part of the Earth and it is through her great generosity that we are nurtured and nourished, eating her food, drinking her waters, clothed in her fabric. Even as we deplete her, she continues to give and give. Her generosity is a lesson for us all. Each morning on my walk I pass a gnarled old apple tree. I watch her boughs become heavy with fruit, slowly reddening as late summer turns to fall. I marvel at how she gives with such abundance without wanting anything in return. Now, in this “season of giving,” if we can remember the constant stream of gifts we receive from her, and be appreciative in our hearts.

As I get older I feel the Earth’s endless generosity more and more, as if I treasure each season in the year and its different offerings, its changing fruits. I know more clearly how I would not be here without this giving. At the same time my heart hurts for the Earth, grieves at the way our culture treats her wonder and gifts, her magic and sacred meaning. And the question arises from my depths, in a culture of seeming abundance how have we lost so much?

So during this natural season of darkening my heart responds to an unnatural darkening. My prayers turn towards a sacred world we seem to have forgotten. This prayer sometimes feels as if the Earth itself were crying through me, imploring us to remember it at this time of need. Maybe in this darkening something can be born, a new way of being that respects all of life, that sustains the whole of creation. Maybe once again we can remember our love for the Earth, our reverence for what is sacred within all of creation, and honor all of its inhabitants. Then our hearts can open and sense the divine that is all around us—our prayers turn into praise. Once again we can live in an ensouled world that nourishes us everyday with sacred meaning.

We are part of a magical, beautiful, and suffering Earth, whose darkening we have created with our endless exploitation. The Earth, which is so infinitely generous, needs our prayers, needs our loving, our open hearts and remembrance. Each morning as I walk in the first light I feel this need, and the response that comes from the depths of my soul: in this time of winter solstice may we include the Earth in our prayers.
We Are Part of a Living Whole – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

An awareness of the inner worlds is an essential part of our human heritage—those worlds that are invisible to our physical sight, but exist in other dimensions of reality. However, this awareness has been censored by rational consciousness and our present culture. This talk explores our need to reclaim our connection to these realities, to return to the greater wholeness to which we belong.

The Relationship Between the Inner & Outer Worlds – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Reason in a Dark Time Why the Struggle Against Climate Change Failed — and What It Means for Our Future ~ Dale Jamieson

From the 1992 Rio Earth Summit to the 2009 Copenhagen Climate Conference there was a concerted international effort to stop climate change. Yet greenhouse gas emissions increased, atmospheric concentrations grew, and global warming became an observable fact of life.

In this book, philosopher Dale Jamieson explains what climate change is, why we have failed to stop it, and why it still matters what we do. Centered in philosophy, the volume also treats the scientific, historical, economic, and political dimensions of climate change. Our failure to prevent or even to respond significantly to climate change, Jamieson argues, reflects the impoverishment of our systems of practical reason, the paralysis of our politics, and the limits of our cognitive and affective capacities. The climate change that is underway is remaking the world in such a way that familiar comforts, places, and ways of life will disappear in years or decades rather than centuries.

Climate change also threatens our sense of meaning, since it is difficult to believe that our individual actions matter. The challenges that climate change presents go beyond the resources of common sense morality — it can be hard to view such everyday acts as driving and flying as presenting moral problems. Yet there is much that we can do to slow climate change, to adapt to it and restore a sense of agency while living meaningful lives in a changing world.

Dale Jamieson teaches Environmental Studies, Philosophy, and Law at New York University, and was formerly affiliated with the National Center for Atmospheric Research. He is the author of Ethics and the Environment: An Introduction, and Morality’s Progress: Essays on Humans, Other Animals, and the Rest of Nature.

Dale Jamieson “Does Environmental Ethics Have a Future?” – PEI Conference 030813

Conference Environmental Humanities in a Changing World_030813 – Dale Jamieson “Does Environmental Ethics Have a Future?”

Festival of Dangerous Ideas 2013: Vandana Shiva – Growth = Poverty


Published on Nov 10, 2013

When natural resources like timber, water and mineral deposits can be extracted from ecosystems, they become assets with dollar values that can be bought and sold internationally and enable developing countries to grow and participate in the global economy. If growth is the key to emerging from poverty, then this might seem like a good thing. But what if these same resources being sold to richer nations come from an ecosystem that people depend on for their livelihood? What if new growth is actually proportional to the creation of new poverty?

The cult of ‘growth’ has dictated policy for decades. But if well-being, not growth, is our goal, selling resources that bring long term wellbeing to communities for short term gain is a very bad deal. Hard as it may be for the West to understand, protecting the ecological resources of communities might be more important than GDP figures.

Vandana Shiva holds a PhD in physics, but is best known as an environmental, and anti-globalisation activist and as a leading figure of ‘ecofeminism.’ Shiva is based in India and is the author of over twenty books, including Staying Alive and Biopiracy. She is a former recipient of the Sydney Peace Prize.

Chair: Simran Sethi is an award-winning Indian American journalist. She is currently undergoing a research fellowship at the University of Melbourne in Australia on the loss of agricultural biodiversity in our food system.

Collapsing Consciously: Transformative Truths for Turbulent Times (Sacred Activism) by Carolyn Baker Ph.D.

A collection of probing essays and weekly meditations, this book addresses how to prepare emotionally and spiritually for the impending collapse of industrial civilization. Author Carolyn Baker offers wisdom, inspiration, and a sense of spiritual purpose for anyone who is concerned about the daunting future humankind has created.

The author’s introduction to Collapsing Consciously articulates our current predicament of economic collapse, environmental degradation, and global conflict and expresses the confusion, anxiety, grief, anger, and despair we all experience when we take a hard look at the present-day global crisis and the likely future of the planet. But rather than showing us ways to prevent the collapse, Baker argues that the demise of our consumerist, corporate culture is inevitable, and that it is crucial to prepare emotionally and spiritually for the certain changes to come.

Part 1 is a collection of seventeen essays which argue that while the collapse of industrial society cannot be prevented, its meaning extends far beyond tragedy and loss. These essays ask the reader to delve inward and discover the limitless treasures of the soul, as well as the gratification and exhilaration to be discovered in joining with community in preparing for the future.

In part 2, Baker offers fifty-two weekly meditations comprised of spiritual wisdom, inspiration, paradox, comfort, humor, irony, poems, and a persistent challenge to create and savor beauty in the world, regardless of how bleak the future may appear.

Collapsing Consciously is a refreshing take on the perilous present and the grim prospects for our future. Instead of quoting discouraging statistics about our predicament, Baker offers a deeper perspective that makes sense of a world that most of the time appears psychotic or even surreal. Through poetry, inspiration, and perennial wisdom, she has created a manual for making meaning and generating joy, especially in situations that feel hopelessly devoid of both.

CAROLYN BAKER, PhD, was a professor of history and psychology for 11 years and a psychotherapist in private practice for 17 years; she currently offers life coaching. She manages the Speaking Truth to Power website at http://www.carolynbaker.net and is the author of six previous books, including Sacred Demise: Walking the Spiritual Path of Industrial Civilization’s Collapse and Navigating the Coming Chaos: A Handbook for Inner Transition.

Click here to browse inside.

Andrew Harvey and Carolyn Baker


The Sacred Demise of Industrial Civilization

As a historian, Carolyn Baker has a keen eye for current events that are indicators of the collapse were seeing all around us. But she’s also a psychologist concerned about how we personally navigate the turbulence and find meaning within it. The author of Sacred Demise: Walking the Spiritual Path of Industrial Civilizations Collapse, she describes the old story that isn’t working anymore (humans are separate from nature), and the new story we must live by for real sustainability. Her Speaking Truth to Power website is a rich collection of articles reflecting both collapse and preparedness action. [www.carolynbaker.net]

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