Category: Meditation/TM


The lives we lead, particularly in the Western world, are technologically overburdened and spiritually impoverished. Our children can tell us the various merits of different operating systems for electronic devices, but are rarely in touch with how different emotions are experienced in the body, or how it feels to bring kindness to a moment of difficulty. They are bombarded almost constantly with information at a rate that mankind even 50 years ago would have struggled to begin to comprehend, and mental illness is at an all-time high.

Research indicates that one of every four adolescents will have an episode of major depression during high school, with the average age of onset being 14 years of age. The human race is at a tipping point, and we have no sane choice but to begin to awaken the capacities within us that have too-long lain dormant. We can choose to lead a child towards awakening, and thus awaken ourselves.


Heather Grace MacKenzie was brought up on the Scottish Isle of Islay, daughter of a farmer and a conservationist. She is a Mindfulness Teacher, Reiki Master and Empowerment Coach. As well as teaching meditation and mindfulness to her own three children and her two step-children, she has taught children of all ages and stages in both family and school settings. Her most important work is mothering four amazing boys.

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“I watch him quietly, this little miracle of creation. He’s sleeping now; his boisterous energy has come to rest. The soft glow of the lamp illuminates his perfect alabaster skin and slightly flushed cheeks. Little freckles dot his cheeks and nose, his chest gently rises and falls and a small sigh escapes from his lips. He’s wearing his favourite light-blue farm-vehicle pyjamas; they’re mostly covered by his bed covers, but a little foot peeks out from beneath. As I reach out to touch his silky blonde hair, he stirs and moves his head to snuggle his cheek into my hand. A glimmer of a smile plays across his face as if he knows mummy’s here, and I know that on some level he’s aware that I’m close by. I witness each beautiful moment unfolding, aware of the flow of my own breath, feeling the cool air rush past the insides of my nostrils, the expansion of the chest, the stretching sensations in the muscles of the abdomen, the pause, the softening of the belly, the fall of the chest, the warmer air rushing past the insides of the nostrils on the out-breath. I’m aware of the sensations of pressure and contact between the soles of my feet and the soft carpet fibres, and tiny adjustments that my muscles make to keep my body balanced. The faint awareness of my pulse, the beating of my heart, underlying each moment. Using all of my senses enables me to inhabit the moment as fully as I can.

Being Logan’s mother for the past six years has been one of the greatest gifts of my life, along with mothering his two older brothers, Connor (aged fifteen) and Ethan (aged thirteen). Each of my children shows me, in each moment that I’m present, whether my communication is clear, whether they feel heard and therefore respected, and whether I’m present to their needs and also my own.”

Excerpt from the forth-coming book, ‘Awakening Child: A journey of inner transformation through teaching your child mindfulness’
by Heather Grace MacKenzie

O-Books: Release Date 29th July 2016,

Let’s be real for a sec. Most of us don’t have time for an hour of yoga or 30 minutes of meditation every day. We’re overwhelmed as it is. Our spiritual practice shouldn’t add to that.

That’s why I’ve handpicked 108 simple techniques to combat our most common problems—stress, burnout, frustration, jealousy, resentment. The stuff we have to deal with on a daily basis. This book is designed so that you can achieve peace and experience miracles now.

Inspired by some of the greatest spiritual teachings, these practical, moment-to-moment tools will help you eliminate blocks and live with more ease. They’re powerful, life-changing meditations and principles, modernized and broken down into easy-to-digest techniques to fit your lifestyle.
Throughout the book, I share principles from both A Course in Miracles and Kundalini yoga and meditation. These tools can help you find your connection to your inner strength. When you practice these techniques, fear will melt away, inspiration will spring up, and a sense of peace will set in.
Gabrielle Bernstein is the New York Times best-selling author Miracles Now, May Cause Miracles, Add More ~ing to Your Life, and Spirit Junkie. She appears regularly as an expert on NBC’s Today show, has been featured on Oprah’s Super Soul Sunday as a next-generation thought leader, and was named “a new role model” by The New York Times.

Gabrielle was chosen as one of 16 YouTube Next Video Bloggers, she was named one of Mashable’s 11 Must-Follow Twitter Accounts for Inspiration, and she was featured on the Forbes List of 20 Best Branded Women. Gabrielle has a monthly segment on the Today show and a weekly radio show on Hay House Radio. She has been featured in media outlets such as The New York Times Sunday Styles, ELLE, OWN, Kathy Lee & Hoda, Oprah Radio, Anderson Live, Access Hollywood, Marie Claire, Health, SELF, Women’s Health, Glamour, The New York Times Thursday Styles, Sunday Times UK, and many more.

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“Miracles Now” Gabrielle Bernstein at Wanderlust’s Speakeasy

Sometimes it feels very easy to slip into the void of negative thinking. In this Speakeasy for Wanderlust Squaw Valley 2014, Gabrielle Bernstein makes it even easier to right the ship and step back into the light.

Gabby shares some intimate stories from her personal life, from defining childhood traumas to very recent examples of how she can sense it when her thinking enters into the judgmental and separatist mindset. From these experiences, she demonstrates how to pull out of those thoughts, and to choose the light.

“I challenge you as you go from tent to tent here at Wanderlust and you get onto that mat and you say, ‘My practice wasn’t that great this morning,’ or, ‘I shouldn’t have eaten that vegan brownie,’ or, ‘I wish I was as good as that teacher but I’ll never get there.’ I challenge you, when you’re in the separation, to choose again, and to open your eyes to the light that is around you. When you’re having those moments of separation and judgment, I invite you to open up, to choose again, to ask. You’ll be restored, you’ll be rejuvenated, and all that separation will be dissolved by the light.”

You can apply this to even the smallest decisions and moments in your life, or if what you’re seeking is a larger life overhaul, Gabby has the tools for you, too. She gives you three very straightforward steps to take when you want to finally make the changes you know you need to turn your life around. It all starts with four simple words: “I want to change.”

Dive into this Speakeasy with Gabby to learn more about:

• how forgiveness can be used as a tool to move forward in your life,
• why asking for what you need is a practice that you need to incorporate into your daily life,
• how to tune in to witness the miracles all around you,
• to recognize that no matter what your profession, your job is not the spreadsheets or the profits, but your job is to ‘be the light.’

Gabby says it best: “When we dwell in the light and the joy of who we are here to be, all boundaries are removed.”


Published on Apr 2, 2016

The Future of Meditation Research (FOMR) is an IONS project exploring the deeper aspects of meditation and transformational experiences.
More information: noetic.org/fomr

Dr. Charles Tart pioneered the field of consciousness studies decades ago, with his classic best-selling anthology Altered States of Consciousness, in print for more than 20 years and selected by Common Boundary as one of the one hundred most influential psychology books of the twentieth century. Tart is credited with almost single-handedly legitimizing the study of altered states, including hypnosis, meditation, lucid dreaming and drug-induced states. He initiated several important lines of research in parapsychology, including teaching ESP and out-of-body experiences. Altered States of Consciousness (1969) and Transpersonal Psychologies (1975), became widely used texts that were instrumental in allowing these areas to become part of modern psychology.


Published on Mar 31, 2016

Dean Radin, PhD, is Chief Scientist at the Institute for Noetic Sciences (IONS) and Volunteer Faculty in the Department of Psychology at Sonoma State University.

The Future of Meditation Research (FOMR) is an IONS project exploring the deeper aspects of meditation and transformational experiences.
More information: noetic.org/fomr

Published on Mar 14, 2016

This guided Vedanta meditation consists of
1. Body-scan
2. Concentration on breath meditation
3. Concentration on the silence
4. You – consciousness – observe the silence and all other objects. Silence, the mind and all objects appear in you – consciousness.
6. Love-Meditation
7. Silence is reflected awareness and you – consciousness – are the observer of the reflection

This guided Vedanta meditation was recorded at Yoga-Vidya Westerwald, Germany in October 2015.
This audio was recorded by Georg Schiller. All mistakes and failures are due to Georg Schiller.

Meditation is a form of mental exercise with numerous scientifically verified physical and psychological benefits. As meditation teacher Rick Heller shows, meditation’s benefits extend beyond the personal to enrich relationships with others, with one’s community, and with the world. In Secular Meditation, step-by-step instructions, personal stories, and provocative questions teach empathy for others, stress reduction, and the kind of in-the-moment living that fosters appreciation for life and resilience in the face of adversity. Heller simplifies what is often found mysterious, describing and providing detailed instructions for 32 different practices, ensuring that anyone can find the right one.

Heller simplifies what is often found mysterious — “If you have ever loved or even liked another person, you have the prerequisites for learning kindness meditation” — and invites all to partake in “awe and wonder at the rich experience of being alive.”


Freelance journalist and meditation instructor Rick Heller has reported for the Lowell Sun and other New England newspapers and has been published in Buddhadharma, UUWorld, Tikkun, Free Inquiry, Faith Street, The Humanist, and Boston magazines. He has contributed short stories to Fantasy and Science Fiction.

Rick is the facilitator of the Humanist Mindfulness Group and has led meditations sponsored by the Humanist Community at Harvard since 2009. He has also attended workshops and retreats at the Cambridge Insight Meditation Center, the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies, and the Insight Meditation Society.

He holds a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from MIT, a master’s degree in public policy from Harvard University, and a master’s degree in journalism from Boston University.

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Secular Meditation – Cultivate Inner Peace, Compassion, & Joy

Published on Mar 7, 2016

Author Rick Heller talks about SECULAR MEDITATION: 32 Practices for Cultivating Inner Peace, Compassion, and Joy. For more info visit http://bit.ly/1LkusgR.


Published on Mar 7, 2016

There are distinct phases that arise as our belief of being a separate ego-I-self falls away, and when it has fallen away. As self falls away, three subtle but distinct aspects of identification with being a separate ego-I-self are be revealed, which need to be understood and, in turn, set free. Then, the realization of what lies beyond all sense of self, mind and separation can be recognized, and its fragrance integrated into all aspects of daily life.

Richard Miller Ph.D. Clinical Psychologist Richard Miller is a clinical psychologist, researcher, yogic scholar, and contemporary spiritual teacher in the tradition of non-dual self inquiry and meditation. Richard is founding president of the Integrative Restoration Institute, co-founder of the International Association of Yoga Therapists, past president of the Institute for Spirituality and Psychology, and a senior advisor to the Baumann Institute. Richard serves as a consultant researching the secular form of non-dual meditation that he’s developed (Integrative Restoration – iRest). Author of Yoga Nidra: The Meditative Heart of Yoga, iRest Meditation: Restorative Practices for Health, Resiliency and Well-Being, and The iRest Program for Healing PTSD, Richard leads retreats worldwide. irest.us

Yoga Nidra: The Meditative Heart of Yoga by Richard Miller (Author)


One of the most enjoyable parts of a yoga class comes when we rest in savasana the corpse pose and realize deep serenity, a sense of effortless joy, and a glimpse into our true nature as unqualified presence. How is this so Master teacher Richard Miller explains that this experience is a manifestation of yoga nidra, the meditative state of mind-body union at the heart of all yoga practice. A powerful integration of book and CD audio learning, Yoga Nidra is an ancient tantric yoga path that leads to inner freedom. The rough accessible language appropriate for any level of practice, Miller takes us step by step through the traditional techniques of relaxation and meditation to help us move toward the realization of unqualified presence the ultimate aim of yoga a goal unreachable through posture practice alone. Through his expert guidance, students will experience: Deep relaxation for relief from

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ShantiMayi – Meditation, Ego, and the Great Mystery

That humanity faces monumental challenges needs no more proof than a scan of the daily news outlets. A deeper look reveals that the cause of our problems is not just political dysfunction, which gets most of the attention. Nor is it economic injustice, or racial and ethnic bigotry, or ecological ignorance, or greed, or educational failure, or any one thing. It is all of those together, and more. It is also a spiritual failure.

For the generation that came of age in the 1960s, this is as disconcerting as it is tragic. I was a student radical back then. I worked for civil rights and marched against the war in Vietnam; I raged against injustice and the ills of capitalism. I wanted a better world, and I believed that changing “the system” was the way to achieve it. As for religion, I was with Karl Marx: it was the opium of the people.

At one point, however, I started to become disillusioned with leftist ideology, revolutionary rhetoric and the behavior of my more radical comrades. On the personal level, I was a confused, desperate young man in the grip of an existential crisis that neither Marx, nor Freud, nor Darwin, nor any of my elders could resolve. I could not find satisfactory answers to the Big Questions of life.

My search for truth, meaning and happiness led to the spiritual traditions of the East. The philosophies and cosmologies resonated with me, and the methods of inner transformation were just what the doctor ordered. I dove into the study of Buddhism and Hinduism, took up meditation and set my sights on enlightenment. Before long, I came to believe that meaningful social change could come only from the inside out. Now I saw politics as the opium of the people.

I became a spiritual activist. I trained as a teacher of Transcendental Meditation and set out to save the world one mantra at a time, convinced that if more and more individuals found inner peace and grew toward higher consciousness society would naturally evolve in the right direction. I was far from alone in that conviction; in the 70s and 80s, the ranks of yogis, new agers, meditators and mystics were filled with former social activists.

In time, practices like yoga, meditation and mindfulness became mainstream, and the way Americans understand religion and practice spirituality changed radically. Now doctors routinely recommend meditation and Christians and Jews routinely engage in contemplative practices. This is a development worth celebrating. But the world did not evolve the way many of us thought it would. Violence, injustice, environmental degradation and other manifestations of ignorance and selfishness continued relatively unabated. Spiritual practitioners started to realize that inner work, no matter how transformative, does not impact the broader social landscape as strongly as we hoped it would.

And yet, that inner work is indispensable. As Einstein purportedly said, “We can’t solve problems with the same thinking we used when we created them.” One can add that we can’t solve problems with the same hearts, the same perceptions, the same maturity, the same egos or the same collective consciousness that prevailed when the problems were created. The evidence suggests that genuine spiritual transformation raises the level of all those attributes. People on authentic spiritual paths tend to become less greedy, less materialistic, less obsessed with acquisition and consumption, less attached to opinions and ideologies. They tend to grow in mental clarity and out-of-the-box thinking, and also in the capacity for compassion and empathy.

We all know exceptions, of course; there is no shortage of self-inflated narcissists in spiritual circles. But it’s safe to say that the arc of inner transformation bends toward wisdom and goodness, and that can only be a plus for society. Personal enlightenment without proper action may be like singing a great song in the shower instead of a concert hall, but action without big minds and open hearts is bound to produce bad notes and dissonant chords. The activists and the contemplatives need one another. Appeals to conscience and morality are not enough. Nor is legislation based on wonkish policy analysis. Nor are citations from scripture or passionate entreaties to be loving and compassionate. If those were enough, history would be vastly different. In short, we don’t just need political reform and educational reform and economic reform; we need consciousness reform. Without it, other reforms will be limited at best.

When I make this argument, people often try to pin me down on policy and get me to take a position on some left-right debate, as if I were running for office. My entire point is that we need to transcend that level of thinking and open ourselves to insights and ideas we can’t anticipate at our present level of awareness. It is reasonable to think that transformative spiritual development might provide an elevated platform from which to see the world differently—a place where creative, innovative ideas can merge with compassion and skillful action, unimpeded by ideologies, labels and past conditioning.

Maybe that platform is located in the transcendental field where Rumi wanted us to meet him, “out beyond ideas of wrongdoing and rightdoing.” It is there, after all, where our essential Oneness is not just imagined or proclaimed but directly experienced. Maybe that is where we can spiritualize social action and activate spirituality.


Philip Goldberg is the author of American Veda and numerous other books; a public speaker and workshop leader; a spiritual counselor, meditation teacher and ordained Interfaith Minister. He is the co-host of the podcast Spirit Matters: Conversations on Contemporary Spirituality. He lives in Los Angeles.


Published on Jan 29, 2016

This meditation explores the nature of ‘I’, and develops to explore the arising of the world within Consciousness as a sacrifice.


We search for some other moment, a moment we imagine will be more fulfilling, more profound, more free, more meaningful… And yet, it is only when we demand something from this moment, when we imagine what’s here is somehow not quite enough, that we experience this heartache of incompleteness and then set about to find its resolution. But we have another choice than to live this way. We can experiment with another possibility, the possibility that this moment, exactly as it is, is actually enough.

In “Searching for Rain in a Monsoon,” we are invited through a series of meditations and inquiries into an exploration of this possibility, that this moment is the miracle we’ve been seeking. After all, the fact that this moment even exists at all is truly beyond comprehension. Without asking or demanding anything from our momentary experience, without insisting it be better, more profound, more fulfilling, or more anything, we can discover a depth and profundity, a richness and fulfillment that has always been here—here, in this very instant, the only one we will ever have.

Along with “Searching for Rain in a Monsoon,” John Astin is also the author of two other collections of poetic and prose reflections on the nature of human awareness and the search for happiness, “Too Intimate for Words” and “This Is Always Enough.” Along with his writing, he is also a singer, songwriter and recording artist who since 1987 has produced seven CDs of original music including his most recent release, What We’ve Always Been. In addition to his music, writing, and teaching work, John holds a PhD in psychology and is an internationally known researcher in the field of mind-body medicine, where his research has focused on the applications of meditative-contemplative practices in psychology and health care. For more information about his work please visit: http://www.johnastin.com

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The Effortlessness of Everything

Published on Dec 17, 2012

Even if in the subtlest of ways, we often imagine that in order to realize greater clarity, peace or awareness in our lives, some (or maybe a great deal of) effort is required. However, in this meditation, we are invited to consider a different possibility, to notice how effortless life can actually be, how no effort is required in order for us to exist, how no effort is needed in order for awareness to be, how the senses and the body all function quite beautifully and naturally with no effort needed to make it so. http://www.johnastin.com

March 15, 2016

A radical approach to mindfulness—combining an ancient meditation technique with leading-edge theory, resulting in a powerful new method of self-transformation.

With practical teachings and detailed instructions, Ken Wilber introduces Integral Mindfulness, a new way of practicing the widely popular meditation. Integral Mindfulness applies many of the leading-edge insights of Ken Wilber’s Integral Theory–the first system to combine Eastern teachings on the five stages of awakening with the eight major Western models of human development, thus portraying the complete path of human evolution. In addition to all the benefits to body, mind, and spirit that standard mindfulness meditation confers, practicing Integral Mindfulness promises a more powerful approach to personal transformation and brings within reach the fullest experience of Enlightenment possible.

Beginning with as little as fifteen to thirty minutes of daily sessions, the meditator can gradually expand from there by slowly and easily adding significant aspects of the practice. Meditation instructions and step-by-step guided contemplations are given in detail. Readers learn how to create a graph to track progress and discover natural strengths and potentials. The book also offers recommended readings and resources to facilitate further study.

KEN WILBER is the founder of Integral Institute and the cofounder of Integral Life. He is an internationally acknowledged leader and the preeminent scholar of the Integral stage of human development. He is the author of more than twenty books, including A Brief History of Everything, A Theory of Everything, Integral Spirituality, No Boundary, Grace and Grit, and Sex, Ecology, Spirituality.

Redefining Enlightenment – Ken Wilber

Ken talks about the need to redefine enlightenment and what it really means and does it very well actually.

From time to time, we all have moments when we feel completely and blissfully alive; moments when the world around us becomes more real and beautiful, when an atmosphere of harmony seems to pervade everything, when we feel one with nature and a feeling of intense well-being fills us. These are sometimes called spiritual experiences, or higher states of consciousness – but I prefer to call them ‘awakening experiences.’

I believe that normal human consciousness is a kind of ‘sleep’ which we wake up from in these moments. Most human beings are asleep in the sense that we normally perceive the world in an automatic way, so that a lot of time we don’t pay attention to our surroundings, and aren’t able to sense the is-ness and alive-ness of the world. We are asleep in the sense that we see all things as separate to each other, and experience ourselves as separate entities, as egos enclosed in our mental space with the rest of the world ‘out there.’ In sleep, life appears meaningless, and the universe can seem an indifferent and even hostile place.

But in my book Waking From Sleep, I suggest that this state of sleep is a psychological aberration, and it is natural and normal for us to be ‘awake.’ Many of the world’s indigenous peoples live in a state of wakefulness: they naturally possess(ed) a heightened perception, a sense of the aliveness of things and, an awareness of spirit-force pervading the world. Young children are naturally awake too. They see the world in a much more real and intense way than adults, experience a powerful natural well-being and often have intense spiritual experiences, where they become one with the world, or see it pervaded with an intense spiritual radiance.

As we grow into adults, we lose this natural wakefulness. This is due to the development of the ego. Our adult egos become too strong and powerful; they give us a strong sense of individuality and separateness, and so create a powerful barrier between us and the world. As a structure, and through their constant activity, they use up a massive amount of energy, leaving little energy available for us to put into perception, resulting in the automatic perception I described earlier. The development of the ego creates a ‘fall’ away from the natural wakefulness of children and indigenous peoples.

However, human beings have always sensed that their normal consciousness is limited and sought temporary awakening experiences. In Waking From Sleep, I examine the methods which we have used throughout history to induce the experiences: e.g. fasting, sleep deprivation, psychedelic drugs, meditation, nature, sex, sports and music. I also examine the paradox of how the experiences can be triggered by intense mental and emotional turmoil, and how the simple presence of an enlightened person can generate them.

I suggest that awakening experiences have two basic sources: they can be caused by a dramatic change to our normal physiology or brain chemistry (e.g. through fasting, sleep deprivation or drugs) or through what I call an ‘intensification and stilling of life-energy,’ through meditation, yoga, general relaxation, listening to music, etc.

If we know what causes them, we should be able to generate awakening experiences whenever we desire. But ultimately, we need to make wakefulness our normal state again. We can attain a permanent state of wakefulness by creating a new state of being in which our life-energy is permanently intensified and stilled. This means changing the structure of our psyche, so that the ego is no longer as powerful, and no longer monopolises our energy.

In Waking From Sleep, I suggest five essential practices which will change the structure of our psyche and create a state of permanent wakefulness: meditation, mindfulness, moderation, detachment and service.

We need to wake up for ourselves, to become free of the illusion of separation and of the psychological discord which fills our lives with suffering, and so that we can stop squandering our lives and our potential in discontent, anxiety and conflict. We need to wake up for the sake of the human race as a whole, in order to free ourselves from the social chaos and conflict which have blighted the last few thousand years of history. The only possibility the human race has of living in harmony – without warfare, inequality, and the oppression of women and different ethnic groups and social groups – is through transcending the over-developed ego which gives rise to conflict. We also need to wake up for the sake of the earth. The only sure way to avoid ecological catastrophe and learn to live in harmony with nature is to transcend our sense of separation to it, and become able to sense its alive-ness and sacredness.

View Here Steve Taylor’s
Waking from Sleep: Why Awakening Experiences Occur and How to Make them Permanent


Published on Nov 12, 2015

A conversation about resistances in the body.

Light Upon Light is a book to touch the heart, and awaken the spirit. It takes the lives of some of the great spiritual masters of the last millennium, from Rumi, to twentieth century saint Darshan Singh, and illuminates their inner quests. More than simply biography, Light Upon Light delves into their perceptions of the world, the innermost workings of their minds, and the life incidents that led them to enlightenment.

In this sense Light Upon Light is not about the spiritual path; it is designed to take the reader and carry them into the spiritual path, and perceive the wisdom of the masters from within. While author Andrew Vidich PhD has exemplary academic credentials, he writes from the heart, and calls the reader to a direct experience, a “felt sense” of the core of these masters’ teachings. He also emphasizes meditation as the universal constant taught by all masters, and has provocative exercises in each chapter to stimulate self-reflection, contemplation, and to give the reader experience of practical meditation techniques. This is a book to be treasured by both long-time spiritual students, and those new to the great masters of the path.

Andrew Vidich, PhD, is an internationally recognized author and educator. A resident of New York, he has taught religion at Manhattan College and Iona College, and is a founding member of the NY Interfaith Council. He has studied meditation for 35 years, and is the author of Love Is a Secret (Aslan, 1994).

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Andrew Vidich: Spiritual Resurrection–Becoming Beings of Love and Light

Each one of us must eventually leave this material world to journey onward to the spirit realm. Speaker Andrew Vidich explores the true meaning of resurrection? Through meditation and appropriate guidance, we can learn how to fly heavenward on the wings of our “light body.” The true meaning of resurrection is to become what we already are: beings of love and light. Become a living embodiment of the resurrection. 2014.

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