Super Genes: Dr Rudi Tanzi & Dr Deepak Chopra Unlock the Astonishing Power of Your DNA


Published on Nov 8, 2015

The authors of the New York Times bestseller Super Brain present a bold new understanding of our genes and how simple changes in lifestyle can boost genetic activity. The leap into “radical well-being” is a promise waiting to be fulfilled. “You are not simply the sum total of the genes you were born with,” writes Deepak Chopra and Rudy Tanzi. “You are the user and controller of your genes, the author of your biological story. No prospect in self-care is more exciting.”

Learning how to shape your gene activity is at the heart of this exciting and eagerly-anticipated book from the bestselling duo behind Super Brain, which became a nationwide hit on public television.

For decades medical science has believed that genes determined our biological destiny. Now the new genetics has changed that assumption forever. You will always have the genes you were born with, but genes are dynamic, responding to everything we think, say, and do. Suddenly they’ve become our strongest allies for personal transformation. When you make lifestyle choices that optimize how your genes behave, you can reach for a state of health and fulfillment undreamed of even a decade ago. The impact on prevention, immunity, diet, aging, and chronic disorders is unparalleled.

Professor of Neurology, Genetics & Aging, Dr. Rudolph Tanzi is leading the charge in research on modification of genes in connection with behavior or disease susceptibility by means of exercise.

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A Brief History of the Study of Consciousness, Stuart Hameroff


Published on Nov 7, 2015

http://www.scienceandnonduality.com/

Stuart Hameroff, M.D., Professor, Anesthesiology and Psychology, Director, Center for Consciousness Studies

Consciousness defines our existence, but the nature of consciousness remains mysterious, debated since ancient times along two general lines. (1) Plato, Descartes and modern neuroscience have asserted that the brain produces conscious awareness, experience and a model of the world, and thus that consciousness emerged during the course of biological evolution.

On the other hand, (2) Eastern philosophy, Aristotle, and modern quantum physics approaches have suggested consciousness is intrinsic to the universe, that consciousness or its precursors preceded life, and may have prompted its origin and evolution. The modern study of consciousness re-emerged in the early 1990s from the shadow of behaviorism (which had banned the topic during most of the 20th century) following well-regarded scientists like Francis Crick, Gerald Edelman and Sir Roger Penrose, and interdisciplinary conferences such as ‘Toward a Science of Consciousness’.

Now, decades into the modern era, understanding is divided along the same ancient lines. (1) Materialist philosophers and cognitive neuroscientists liken consciousness to a computer simulation, and the brain to a computer, with neuronal firings and synaptic transmissions equated to ‘bit states’ and switches in silicon (rendering consciousness epiphenomenal and devoid of causal power).

Sufficiently complex computation is presumed to result in consciousness, and billions of dollars and euros are aimed at ‘mapping’ brain neurons and connections, with the hope such maps implemented in silicon will reproduce brain function including consciousness (although such mapping strategies, e.g. for simple worms, have thus far failed). (2) Quantum approaches, e.g. based on intra-neuronal structures such as microtubules, once considered unlikely at warm biological temperatures, have gained ground due to plant photosynthesis utilizing quantum coherence, and discovery of quantum resonances in microtubules. Quantum approaches connect brain function to fundamental spacetime geometry, consistent with ancient Eastern views of consciousness
intrinsic to the universe.

Heather Berlin & Dr. Deepak Chopra: The Neuroscience Of Consciousness


Published on Oct 19, 2015

Neural correlates of consciousness help in understanding the brain but the origins of consciousness remain elusive.

Heather Berlin: Cognitive Science of the Unconscious Mind

Watch This Beautiful 10-Minute Film On The Current State Of Neuroscience

Watch This Beautiful 10-Minute Film on the Current State of Neuroscience
The brain is one of the most-studied – and most complex – things on the planet, so it can be hard to keep up with what the current state of neuroscience is. This 10-minute video does a wonderful job of explaining.

It’s a whistle-stop tour of the entire field of brain science, from the treatment of neuro-degenerative diseases and brain-computer interfaces, to building unprecedented maps of the brain’s deep-most connections and the ethics of tampering with them. It ricochets between researchers from places like Imperial College London, Johns Hopkins, Harvard, Stanford and Max Planck Institute. And it’s also beautifully put together. It’s well worth a watch.

Source: Gizmodo

Fingerprints of God :The Search for the Science of Spirituality by Barbara Hagerty [Updated Sept 22, 2015]

Description
From the award-winning NPR religion correspondent comes a fascinating investigation of how science is seeking to answer the question that has puzzled humanity for generations: Can science explain God?

Is spiritual experience real or a delusion? Are there realities that we can experience but not easily measure? Does your consciousness depend entirely on your brain, or does it extend beyond? In Fingerprints of God, award-winning journalist Barbara Bradley Hagerty delves into the discoveries science is making about how faith and spirituality affect us physically and emotionally as it attempts to understand whether the ineffable place beyond this world can be rationally —even scientifically—explained.

Hagerty interviews some of the world’s top scientists to describe what their groundbreaking research reveals about our human spiritual experience. From analyses of the brain functions of Buddhist monks and Carmelite nuns, to the possibilities of healing the sick through directed prayer, to what near-death experiences illuminate about the brain and consciousness, Bradley Hagerty reaches beyond what we think we know to understand what happens to us when we believe in a higher power.

Paralleling the discoveries of science is Bradley Hagerty’s own account of her spiritual evolution. Raised a Christian Scientist, she was a scrupulous adherent until a small moment as an adult triggered a revaluation of her beliefs, which in turn led her to a new way of thinking about God and faith.

An insightful examination of what science is learning about how and why we believe, Fingerprints of God is also a moving story of one person’s search for a communion with a higher power and what she discovered on that journey.

Bio

The first sign that Barbara Bradley Hagerty had a future as a writer appeared in her kindergarten report card.

“Barbie always listens very carefully to the stories we read, and asks questions about why people do the things they do,” the teacher wrote, adding, “She’s very dexterous with the scissors.” Bradley allowed her scissoring skills to go fallow, but her curiosity about stories and her desire to tell others what she had found out led her into journalism.

After graduating from Williams College with an economics degree, she shunned investment banking for the lowest-paying job she was offered: as a copy kid at The Christian Science Monitor. When Bradley informed the managing editor that she wanted to be a foreign correspondent, she found herself at age 23 working on the foreign desk, editing all coverage from Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union just as President Reagan was demanding that Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev tear down the Berlin Wall. Three years later, Bradley became the Monitor’s economics correspondent in Washington, soon moving on to cover the Iran-contra scandal as the Justice Department correspondent.

At 29, she was posted in Japan as Asia correspondent for the Monitor’s nightly television news program, World Monitor. She traveled throughout Asia for three years, covering, among other events, the rise of Burmese dissident Aung San Suu Kyi and that country’s first “free and fair” elections in a quarter-century, which the military junta marked by imprisoning all of the democracy party winners. Bradley’s coverage prompted her quick exit from the country, to the relief of the Burmese military intelligence officer assigned to her, who had staggered behind her each morning as she did her eight-mile run.

It was while on a fellowship at Yale Law School in 1994 that Bradley, suffering from a bad case of stomach flu, first experienced the wonders of Tylenol – an event that was instrumental in leaving the faith of her childhood, Christian Science, and launching an intense spiritual search. She joined National Public Radio in 1995. Among her most memorable moments there was her first day covering the Justice Department, when Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr delivered his salacious report about President Bill Clinton to Congress. While at the Justice Department, Bradley reported on an array of national and international stories, ranging from the Clinton impeachment to the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001. Her coverage earned her, along with other NPR reporters, the Peabody and Foreign Press Club awards.

In 2003, the (newly married) Bradley Hagerty moved to the religion beat at NPR as the sex abuse scandal in the Catholic Church and the culture wars under George W. Bush were unfolding. The awards for her religion reporting include the Religion Newswriters Award and the 2009 Gracie Award for Women in Radio and Television. She was one of 10 journalists selected for a Templeton-Cambridge fellowship in science and religion in 2005, where she and her colleagues spent weeks questioning world-class scientists and theologians at Cambridge University. At Cambridge she realized she must finally address her recurring question: Is there more than this? Fingerprints of God is her attempt to answer that question by diving into the emerging science of spirituality.

Barbara Bradley Hagerty lives in Washington, D.C., with her husband, Devin Hagerty, professor and international security expert, and her yellow Labrador retriever, Sandra Day.

BROWSE HERE

Barbara Bradley Hagerty: Fingerprints of God

Bethanne Patrick talks to Barbara Bradley Hagerty about her new book, Fingerprints of God: The Search for the Science of Spirituality.

Did Man Create God?: Is Your Spiritual Brain at Peace With Your Thinking Brain? by David Comings (Author)

Winner of USA Book News Best book for Religion and Finalist for Science. Recipient of the prestigious Mom’s Choice Awards that honor excellence in family-friendly media, products and services.

Unlike recent popular books that call for the end of faith and religion, this book by Dr. David Comings, an internationally renown physician, human geneticist and neuroscientist, proposes that spirituality is genetically hardwired into a specific part of the brain, is pleasurable, is critical to the evolution and survival of man, and will never go away.

The primary goal of the book is to allow the reader to develop a rational spirituality in which their thinking brain and spiritual brain can live in peace. A basic assumption of most humans is that God created man and divinely influenced the writing of all his sacred books. This book dispassionately explores the possibility that in pre-modern times man created the theory of a personal God to answer questions about the physical world like,

*Where did we come from?
*Where do we go when we die?

in order to satisfy the transcendent yearnings of our spiritual brain. In an era when politicians are judged on the basis of the strength of their belief in God, when schools are urged to teach Intelligent Design, and when religious terrorists threaten the existence of Western civilization it is critical to dispassionately examine the question Did God Create Man or Did Man Create God?

The book examines a wide range of issues including intelligent answers to intelligent design; the relevance of modern cosmology to the existence or non-existence of god; the role of genes in spirituality; the evolution of spirituality; innate morality; the positive and negative aspects of religion; the problem of evil, and many others.

Combined these chapters indicate that humans are inherently happy and good, independent of religion, and that spirituality played a critical role in the evolution and survival of man. A feeling of being associated with something that transcends one s self became an important, rewarding, comforting, and innate part of the human condition. Michael Shermer called this the most detailed and up-to-date science ever generated on the subject of religion and suggested it will be the definitive scientific reference on religion for some time to come.
The world recently learned that Mother Theresa had life-long doubts about her faith. This book is for others who have also questioned any part of their faith but treasure their spirituality and want answers that are not hostile to religion.

Dr. Comings concludes that religious intolerance, wars and terrorism are based on irrational spirituality where there is an incompatibility between the rational and spiritual brain, where individuals believe that one person s God is better than another’s. By contrast a rational spirituality allows individuals of all religions to live in peace. This book is a potentially life changing read for anyone who has ever had doubts about their faith or religion but wanted responses that were sympathetic to their spiritual brain.

Dr. Comings is a physician, neuroscientist, behavioral and molecular geneticist who was the Director of the Department of Medical Genetics at the City of Hope National Medical Center for 37 years before retiring in 2002. He is an internationally known scientist-physician who has written over 450 scientific articles and three books including Tourette Syndrome and Human Behavior His research areas included cytogenetics, human behavioral and molecular genetics, and he ran a large behavioral medicine clinic specializing in Tourette Syndrome, ADHD and oppositional defiant behavior in children. He was past editor of the American Journal of Human Genetics and past president of the American Society of Human Genetics.

LOOK INSIDE

Did Man Create God? The Spiritual Brain

Is there a specific part of the brain for feelings of spirituality? Many lines of evidence suggests it is the temporal lobes. Dr. David Comings, a renown human geneticist, neuroscientist and physician proposes that spirituality is genetically hardwired into a specific part of the brain, is pleasurable, is critical to the evolution and survival of man, and will never go away. Understanding the biology of the spiritual brain can help us to develop a rational spirituality where are rational brain and spiritual brain can live in peace.

Quantum Shift in the Global Brain : How the New Scientific Reality Can Change Us and Our World By Ervin Laszlo [updated July 07, 2015]

About Quantum Shift in the Global Brain

The shift from scientific materialism to a multidimensional worldview in harmony with the world’s great spiritual traditions

• Articulates humanity’s critical choice–to be the last decade of an outgoing, obsolete world, or the first of a new and viable one

• Presents a new “reality map” to guide us through the environmental, scientific, and geopolitical upheavals we are experiencing

Our world is in a Macroshift. The reality we are experiencing today is a substantially new reality–climate change, global corporations, industrialized agriculture–challenging us to change with our rapidly changing world, lest we perish.

In this book, Ervin Laszlo presents a new “reality map” to guide us through the world shifts we are experiencing–the problems, opportunities, and challenges we face individually as well as collectively–in order to help us understand what we must do during this time of great transition. Science’s cutting edge now views reality as broader, as multiple universes arising in a possibly infinite meta-universe, as well as deeper, extending into dimensions at the subatomic level. Laszlo shows that aspects of human experience that had previously been consigned to the domain of intuition and speculation are now being explored with scientific rigor and urgency. There has been a shift in the materialistic scientific view of reality toward the multidimensional worldview of multiple interconnected realities long known by the world’s great spiritual traditions. By understanding the interconnectedness of our changing world as well as our changing “map” of the world, we can navigate with insight, wisdom, and confidence.

Ervin Laszlo, twice nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, is editor of the international periodical World Futures: The Journal of General Evolution and Chancellor-Designate of the newly formed GlobalShift University. He is the founder and president of the international think tanks the Club of Budapest and the General Evolution Research Group and the author of 83 books translated into 21 languages. He lives in Italy.

Click here to browse inside.

Present! – Ervin Laszlo and WorldShift 2012 (part one)

Dr. Laszlo talks about practical ways to transform our current crisis into a process of planetary renewal (part one of a two part talk).

Present! – Ervin Laszlo and WorldShift 2012 (part two)

The Mind’s Own Physician: A Scientific Dialogue with the Dalai Lama on the Healing Power of Meditation by Jon Kabat-Zinn PhD (Editor), Richard J. Davidson PhD (Editor)

By inviting the Dalai Lama and leading researchers in medicine, psychology, and neuroscience to join in conversation, the Mind & Life Institute set the stage for a fascinating exploration of the healing potential of the human mind. The Mind’s Own Physician presents in its entirety the thirteenth Mind and Life dialogue, a discussion addressing a range of vital questions concerning the science and clinical applications of meditation: How do meditative practices influence pain and human suffering? What role does the brain play in emotional well-being and health? To what extent can our minds actually influence physical disease? Are there important synergies here for transforming health care, and for understanding our own evolutionary limitations as a species?

Edited by world-renowned researchers Jon Kabat-Zinn and Richard J. Davidson, this book presents this remarkably dynamic interchange along with intriguing research findings that shed light on the nature of the mind, its capacity to refine itself through training, and its role in physical and emotional health.
Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD, is internationally known for his work as a scientist, writer, and meditation teacher engaged in bringing mindfulness into the mainstream of medicine and society. He is professor of medicine emeritus at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and author of numerous books, including Full Catastrophe Living, Arriving at Your Own Door, and Coming to Our Senses.

Richard J. Davidson is the William James and Vilas Research Professor of Psychology and Psychiatry, Director of the Waisman Laboratory for Brain Imaging and Behavior and the Laboratory for Affective Neuroscience, Founder and Chair and the Center for Investigating Healthy Minds, Waisman Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Please visit his website at http://richardjdavidson.com/

Look Inside

Richard Davidson – Compassion & the Heart Brain Connection

Richard Davidson overviews research on heart rate and brain activity changes in relation to the cultivation of ‘compassion’.

ISCS 2014 – Keynote Dialogue – His Holiness the Dalai Lama

Science and Society: An Interactive Dialogue with His Holiness the Dalai Lama, Richard J. Davidson, and Amishi Jha

Chris Fields : 1.Entanglement and consciousness 2. Reflections on the universality of consciousness 3. The process of object recognition in the human brain 4.The limitations of rational thought 5.The role of insight in scientific discovery


Published on May 22, 2015

Chris Fields ponders the question whether or not entanglement can teach us something about the nature of consciousness. This video is an excerpt from SAND Anthology Vol. 5:
http://www.scienceandnonduality.com/p…

Dr. Chris Fields is an independent scientist interested in both the physics and the cognitive neuroscience underlying the human perception of objects as spatially and temporally bounded entities. His particular interests include quantum information theory and quantum computing on the one hand, and creative problem solving, early childhood development and autism-spectrum conditions on the other. His recent papers have appeared in the International Journal of Theoretical Physics, Information, International Journal of General Systems, Advances in Cognitive Psychology, Frontiers in Perception Science and Medical Hypotheses among others. He is currently editing a Research Topic titled “How humans recognize objects: Segmentation, categorization and individual identification” for Frontiers in Perception Science.

Dr. Fields began his career as an experimental physicist, obtained his Ph.D. in Philosophy of Science (University of Colorado, Boulder, 1985), and was an early developer of automated DNA sequence analysis tools and systems for the Human Genome Project. He has published over 130 refereed papers in nuclear physics, artificial intelligence, molecular biology and cognitive psychology. He holds U.S Patent # 5355435 (1994) for an integrated circuit chip that simulates a mammalian cortical neuron. Dr. Fields was the founding Scientific Director of the National Center for Genome Resources (Santa Fe, NM) and the founding Chief Scientific Officer of Molecular Informatics Inc.

Dr. Fields has also been a volunteer firefighter, a visual artist, and a travel writer. He currently divides his time between Santa Fe, NM and Caunes Minervois, a village in southwestern France.

Reflections on the universality of consciousness, Chris Fields

Chris Fields reflects on the arising of consciousness. This video is an excerpt from SAND Anthology Vol. 5:

The process of object recognition in the human brain

Chris Fields reflects on the process of object recognition and memory. This video is an excerpt from SAND Anthology Vol. 5:

The limitations of rational thought, Chris Fields

Chris Fields reflects on the limitations of rational thought. This video is an excerpt from SAND Anthology Vol. 5:

The role of insight in scientific discovery

Dean Radin: 1.The difference between supernatural and supernormal 2. Was the Buddha a supernormal human? 3. Science, intuition and dreams 4. The view of neuroscience on consciousness and the brain3.


Published on May 20, 2015

Dean Radin explains the distinction between supernatural and supernormal. This video is an excerpt from SAND Anthology Vol. 5:
http://www.scienceandnonduality.com/p…

Dean Radin, PhD, is Chief Scientist at the INSTITUTE OF NOETIC SCIENCES (IONS) and Volunteer Faculty in the Department of Psychology at Sonoma State University. Before joining the research staff at IONS in 2001, he held appointments at AT&T Bell Labs, Princeton University, University of Edinburgh, and SRI International. He is author or coauthor of over 200 technical and popular articles, a dozen book chapters, and three books including the award-winning The Conscious Universe (HarperOne, 1997), Entangled Minds (Simon & Schuster, 2006), and the 2014 Silver Nautilus Book Award winner, SUPERNORMAL (Random House, 2013). View Here

Was the Buddha a supernormal human?

Published on May 20, 2015

Dean Radin reflects on the scientific validity of the supernormal stories that surround the Buddha. This video is an excerpt from SAND Anthology Vol. 5:

Science, intuition and dreams

The view of neuroscience on consciousness and the brain

Dean Radin explains the view of neuroscience on consciousness and the brain. This video is an excerpt from SAND Anthology Vol. 5:

What Is Consciousness? – Deepak Chopra, Rudolph Tanzi, Menas Kafatos and Lothar Schäfer


“What Is Consciousness & Where Is It?” – a panel conversation recorded at Science and Nonduality Conference 2013 with Rudolph Tanzi, Menas Kafatos and Lothar Schäfer facilitated by Deepak Chopra

What is the fundamental activity in the universe? Although neuroscience has made
enormous progress in looking at the brain correlates of subjective and objective experience,
there is still no theory on how we experience mental or perceptual reality. Where our memories are stored? Is there a scientifically viable way to explain consciousness? Does mainstream science have the methodologies to address this question? Are there states of consciousness that go beyond waking, dreaming and sleeping? Is our current science which is based on a subject/object split equipped to answer these mysteries? What is the nature of the universe? What is the of nature awareness that makes it possible for us to experience the universe?

http://www.scienceandnonduality.com

Vedic astrology and NeuroScience ~ Sam Geppi – Astrologer

Published on Mar 12, 2015
Vedic Astrology and NeuroScience

http://www.samgeppi.com/quantum1-neur… is where I will be giving other Videos in this series,..

The connection between the brain, time, karma and many other things are discussed. Astrology can help you resolving inner conflicts, when connected with the deeper workings of the brain it becomes clear.
Check this out.

Does Consciousness need a Brain? – Evidence for Reincarnation

Published on Oct 5, 2014

Dr. Bruce Greyson reports of cases that suggest that consciousness does not need a physical brain and in fact not even a physical body. Presented at the “Cosmology and Consciousness Conference” hosted by Upper TCV, Dharamsala, in 2011
This video is from http://www.scienceformonks.org
On YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/user/sciencef…

The Cerebrospinal Fluid and the Appearance of “I Am”, Mauro Zappaterra

Published on Jan 23, 2015
Certain traditions believe there is a ‘step-down’ process or condensation that occurs from the Source to our physical self. As this energy condenses it becomes more differentiated and visible to the human eye as physical form. As this condensation occurs, certain traditions believe that the initial ‘step’ into the body occurs at the third eye, or the brow center.

At this same location is the third ventricle, a space in the middle of the brain filled with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). As the energy from the Source condenses into physical form, the ‘step’ into the physical body may be into this fluid that bathes the entire inner and outer surface of the brain and spinal cord.

Nisargadatta Maharaj said, “fluids come together and the ‘I Am’ appears.” The CSF may be the fluid through which the ‘I Am’ appears. The CSF is a conveyor of energy. An adult produces 500ml of CSF daily. While the CSF is 99% water, the CSF is also rich in proteins, ions, lipids, hormones, cholesterol, glucose, and many other molecules.

The CSF is home to many neurotransmitters and signaling molecules providing an elaborate range of biological functions. The CSF utilizes volume transmission and its components can potentially be dispersed quickly and target key brain regulatory centers simultaneously due to its fluid nature. Moreover, along the third ventricle, the pineal gland makes direct contact with the CSF, and releases information directly into the CSF for volume transmission to the rest of the brain. In addition, the CSF contains the ‘spirit molecule’ DMT that is released by the pineal gland. Therefore, the CSF may serve as a vehicle for immediate signaling to major control centers of the brain and may be significant in regulating consciousness and the sense of ‘I Am’.

Realizing Awakened Consciousness Interviews with Buddhist Teachers and a New Perspective on the Mind by Richard P. Boyle

Pub Date June 09, 2015

If, as Buddhism claims, the potential for awakening exists in all human beings, we should be able to map the phenomenon with the same science we apply to other forms of consciousness. A student of cognitive social science and a Zen practitioner for more than forty years, Richard P. Boyle brings his sophisticated perspective to bear on the development of a theoretical model for both ordinary and awakened consciousness.

Boyle conducts probing interviews with eleven prominent Western Buddhist teachers (Shinzen Young, John Tarrant, Ken McLeod, Ajahn Amaro, Martine Batchelor, Shaila Catherine, Gil Fronsdal, Stephen Batchelor, Pat Enkyo O’Hara, Bernie Glassman, and Joseph Goldstein) and one scientist (James Austin) who have experienced awakening. From the paths they traveled to enlightenment and their descriptions of the experience, he derives three fundamental properties of awakened consciousness. He then constructs an overarching model that explains how Buddhist practices help free the mind from attachments to reality and the self and make possible the three properties of awakening. Specifically, these teachers describe how they worked to control attention and quiet the mind, detach from ideas and habits, and open themselves to compassion. Boyle’s account incorporates current theories of consciousness, sociological insights, and research in neuroscience to advance the study of awakened consciousness and help an even greater number of people to realize it.


Richard Boyle
was an associate professor of sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles, until 1972, when he left to pursue his studies in Buddhism in the mountains of northern New Mexico. Some years later, he moved to Albuquerque and worked as a senior research scientist at the University of New Mexico’s Institute for Social Research. He is recently retired.

Waking, Dreaming, Being :Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy ~ Evan Thompson [updated Dec 21, 2014]

Pub Date Nov 11 2014

A renowned philosopher of the mind, also known for his groundbreaking work on Buddhism and cognitive science, Evan Thompson combines the latest neuroscience research on sleep, dreaming, and meditation with Indian and Western philosophy of the mind, casting new light on the self and its relation to the brain.

Thompson shows how the self is a changing process, not a static thing. When we are awake we identify with our body, but if we let our mind wander or daydream, we project a mentally imagined self into the remembered past or anticipated future. As we fall asleep, the impression of being a bounded self distinct from the world dissolves, but the self reappears in the dream state. If we have a lucid dream, we no longer identify only with the self within the dream. Our sense of self now includes our dreaming self, the “I” as dreamer. Finally, as we meditate — either in the waking state or in a lucid dream — we can observe whatever images or thoughts arise and how we tend to identify with them as “me.” We can also experience sheer awareness itself, distinct from the changing contents that make up our image of the self.

Contemplative traditions say that we can learn to let go of the self, so that when we die we can witness the dissolution of the self with equanimity. Thompson weaves together neuroscience, philosophy, and personal narrative to depict these transformations, adding uncommon depth to life’s profound questions. Contemplative experience comes to illuminate scientific findings, and scientific evidence enriches the vast knowledge acquired by contemplatives.
Evan Thompson is professor of philosophy at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, and a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada. He is the author of Mind in Life: Biology, Phenomenology, and the Sciences of Mind and Colour Vision: A Study in Cognitive Science and the Philosophy of Perception; coauthor of The Embodied Mind: Cognitive Science and Human Experience; and co-editor of Self, No Self? Perspectives from Analytical, Phenomenological, and Indian Traditions and The Cambridge Handbook of Consciousness.

Evan Thompson was born in 1962 in Ithaca, NY, and grew up in Boston, New York, and Toronto. After 8 years as a Professor in the Philosophy Department at the University of Toronto, he moved in July 2013 to the Philosophy Department at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. He writes about the mind, life, consciousness, and the self, from the perspectives of cognitive science, philosophy of mind, phenomenology, and cross-cultural philosophy (especially Buddhism and other Indian philosophical traditions). As a teenager, Evan was home-schooled in Southampton, NY and Manhattan at the Lindisfarne Association, an educational and contemplative community founded by his father, William Irwin Thompson. He received his A.B. in Asian Studies from Amherst College (1983), and his Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Toronto (1990).

Read an interview here

Evan Thompson – “Waking, Dreaming, Being” at CIIS

Dr. Evan Thompson is a professor of philosophy at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. He is currently the Numata Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies at UC Berkeley, where he is teaching a course on the dialogue between Buddhism, Phenomenology, and Cognitive Science. He is the author of numerous articles and several books, including The Embodied Mind (1991), Mind in Life (2007) and Waking, Dreaming, Being: New Light on the Self and Consciousness from Neuroscience, Meditation and Philosophy (forthcoming).

Is Consciousness More than the Brain? | Interview with Dr. Gary Schwartz


Published on Oct 1, 2014
We at The Thunderbolts Project think that no truly coherent cosmology can fail to address human consciousness. As Wal Thornhill has written, “A real cosmology must be a broad and coherent natural philosophy. It may always be incomplete, based on our limitations, but to be valid there can be no exceptions in our experience. In particular, cosmology must address issues of life and the human condition. Therefore it must be a truly interdisciplinary pursuit.”

Today, perhaps the ultimate unsolved mystery of human life is: how and why does consciousness exist? Although some scientific literature still acknowledges that the question remains open, the overwhelming consensus among neuroscientists today is that the brain alone creates conscious experience. However, for decades, acclaimed scientists around the world have conducted research into consciousness that provides a very different picture. One of the most remarkable of these researchers is Dr. Gary Schwartz, professor of psychology, medicine, neurology, psychiatry and surgery at the University of Arizona and director of its Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health. We asked Dr. Gary Schwartz for his thoughts on the mystery of consciousness.

Dr Schwartz’s website: http://www.drgaryschwartz.com/

Gary E. Schwartz, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology, Medicine, Neurology, Psychiatry, and Surgery at the University of Arizona, at the main campus in Tucson. In addition to teaching courses on health and spiritual psychology, he is the Director of the Laboratory for Advances in Consciousness and Health.

Gary received his Ph.D. in psychology from Harvard University in 1971 and was an assistant professor at Harvard for five years. He later served as a professor of psychology and psychiatry at Yale University, was director of the Yale Psychophysiology Center, and co-director of the Yale Behavioral Medicine Clinic, before moving to Arizona in 1988.

Manifesto for a Post-Materialist Science: http://opensciences.org/about/manifes…

Previous videos on this channel relating to consciousness:

Dr. Rupert Sheldrake at EU 2013: Science Set Free: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0waMBY…

What Is Time to the Unconscious Mind? – Julia Mossbridge, M.A., Ph.D.

Published on Dec 9, 2014

For most of us, our everyday conscious minds feel the stream of conscious experience flowing linearly through what we call the past, present and future. But how do non-conscious mental processes interact with events that take place in time? By definition, we aren’t privy to our non-conscious minds, so to get at this question, we have to use some tricks.

I will first briefly describe current neuroscientific and psychological ideas about how everyday conscious awareness creates a sense of order and temporal flow. Then we will delve into the methods used to examine how non-conscious processes interact with events, and how the results of such experiments can inform our understanding about the nature of reality and time. Specifically, I will describe the methods and implications of experiments examining non-conscious “time bending” (i.e., differences between our everyday conscious version of time and the versions accessed by non-conscious processes), including presentiment/precognition experiments and their implications.

Finally, I will discuss a new model describing how the so-called past, present, and future collapse under the influence non-conscious processing. Taken from another point of view, this model also addresses how the past, present, and future are manufactured for use by everyday conscious processes.

The Neurotic’s Guide to Avoiding Enlightenment: How the Left-Brain Plays Unending Games of Self-Improvement by Chris Niebauer Phd (Author)

Has Self-Improvement Helped the Self?

More than ever people are on a quest for self-improvement and enlightenment. People are “watching” their egos or losing their egos in order to find peace of mind or to get along better with others. And yet, the more we try to lose our ego, the more of it there is to lose. The more we try to make peace, the more we find conflict. It is exactly what happens when we try not to think of the number 3 and that is all we can think about. Our efforts seem to have the opposite effect and this is due to the way the left side of the brain processes information.

Neuroscience discovered that the left brain makes up elaborate stories and convincing explanations. It is the left brain that makes up the most elaborate and convincing story of all, the story of who you think you are. And the more we try to get out of this story, the deeper we find ourselves in it because it is the function of the left brain to work on the law of opposition. Try not to be anxious and that’s exactly what happens. Try not to worry and you will be flooded with anxious thoughts. And the same is true for self-improvement. The more we try to improve our story, the more the story needs to be improved. The left brain excels at these games even when it plays by pretending not to play. If I said that all attempts at self-improvement are futile, how would you respond? Would you reflexively think I’m wrong? Is there any way not to play these games of the left brain? Which part of your brain do you think is asking this question?

This book was written for the ordinary person who has an extraordinary curiosity for who they are, how thoughts work and why they cannot control their thoughts. It is a practical guide that uses examples from my kids, favorite movies and TV shows from the 80s and 90s along with simple exercises so you can see for yourself if any of this is on track.

While no special knowledge of the neurosciences is required, you may understand many of the examples if you’ve seen an episode or two of Star Trek or Seinfeld. While this work is based on the teachings of Alan Watts and Eckhart Tolle it integrates the findings of modern neuroscience which surprisingly reveals a similar message. It is the desire for enlightenment that is the biggest block to happiness and peace, in fact, it is the only block. It is not until one gives up the quest to find oneself, improve oneself or be more spiritual, that one can ever find the peace they are looking for. And it is not your ego that gives up this quest, it is you.

The author received his Ph.D. in Cognitive Neuropsychology from the University of Toledo where he specialized in left-right brain differences. He has conducted research on consciousness, handedness, beliefs and the sense of self and is currently an associate professor of cognitive psychology at Slippery Rock University in Pennsylvania.

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