The Four Rules Of Living According To Lao Tzu

Published on Aug 23, 2017 

The Four Rules Of Living According To Lao Tzu

Author Matt Caron for Sivanaspirit.com
The original article can be found here: http://blog.sivanaspirit.com/sp-gn-ru…

Music by Incompetech.com
Photos from Upsplash and Pixabay.

The 7 Most Intriguing Philosophical Arguments for the Existence of God ~ George Dvorsky

The 7 Most Intriguing Philosophical Arguments for the Existence of God

Nietzsche said God is dead, but here are seven fascinating and provocative philosophical arguments for the existence of God.

This article originally appeared on io9.com, and is reprinted here with their permission.

Nietzsche is famous for saying that God is dead, but news of The Almighty’s demise may have been greatly exaggerated. Here are some of the most fascinating and provocative philosophical arguments for the existence of God.

To be clear, these are philosophical arguments. They’re neither rooted in religious scripture nor any kind of scientific observation or fact. Many of these arguments, some of which date back thousands of years, serve as interesting intellectual exercises, teasing apart what we think we know about the universe and our place within it from what we think we’re capable of knowing. Other arguments, like the last two listed, are attempts to reconcile questions that currently plague scientists and philosophers.
Now, none of these arguments make a definitive case for the existence of God, and many of them are (fairly) easily debunked or problematized (as I’ll try to show). But at the very least, they offer considerable food for thought.

Finally, by “God” or “god,” we’re not talking about any specific religious deity. As this list shows, the term can encompass everything from a perfect, omnipotent being to something that can be considered even a bit banal.

1) The very notion of an all-perfect being means God has to exist

This is the classic ontological, or a priori, argument. It was first articulated in 1070 by St. Anselm, who argued that because we have a conception of an all-perfect being — which he defined as “that than which nothing greater can be conceived” — it has to exist. In his essay “Proslogion,” St. Anselm conceived of God as a being who possesses all conceivable perfection. But if this being “existed” merely as an idea in our minds, then it would be less perfect than if it actually existed. So it wouldn’t be as great as a being who actually existed, something that would thus contradict our definition of God — a being who’s supposed to be all-perfect. Thus, God must exist.

Okay, admittedly, this sounds a bit weird by modern standards. Actually, it even sounded weird back then; Gaunilo of Marmoutiers ripped apart Anselm’s idea by asking people to conceive of an island “more excellent” than any other island, revealing the flaws in this type of argumentation. Today, we know that this type of a priori argument (i.e., pure deduction) is grossly limited, often tautological, and utterly fails to take empirical evidence into account.

But surprisingly, it was a position defended by none other than Rene Descartes. His take on the matter is a bit more illustrative; Descartes, in his “Fifth Meditation,” wrote that the conception of a perfect being who lacks existence is like imagining a triangle whose interior angles don’t sum to 180 degrees (he was big on the notion of innate ideas and the doctrine of clear and distinct perception). So, because we have the idea of a supremely perfect being, we have to conclude that a supremely perfect being exists; to Descarte, God’s existence was just as obvious, logical, and self-evident as the most basic mathematical truths.

2) Something must have caused the Universe to exist

Philosophers call this one the First-Cause Argument, or the Cosmological Argument, and early advocates of this line of reasoning included Plato, Aristotle, and St. Thomas Aquinas. It’s predicated on the assumption that every event must have a cause, and that cause in turn must have a cause, and on and on and on. Assuming there’s no end to this regression of causes, this succession of events would be infinite. But an infinite series of causes and events doesn’t make sense (a causal loop cannot exist, nor a causal chain of infinite length). There’s got to be something — some kind of first cause — that is itself uncaused. This would require some kind of “unconditioned” or “supreme” being — which the philosophers call God.

I’m sure you’ve already come up with your own objections to the First-Cause Argument, including the issue of a first-causer having to have its own cause. Also, infinity does in fact appear to be a fundamental quality of the universe. All this said, however, cosmologists are still struggling to understand the true nature of time and what “caused” the Big Bang to happen in the first place.

3) There has to be something rather than nothing

Called the Cosmological Argument from Contingency, this is a slightly different take on the First-Cause Argument. The German philosopher Gottfried Leibniz put it best when he wrote,

Why is there something rather than nothing? The sufficient reason … is found in a substance which … is a necessary being bearing the reason for its existence within itself.

Because it’s impossible for only contingent beings to exist, he argued, a necessary being must exist — a being we call God. Writing in “Monadology,” he wrote that “no fact can be real or existing and no statement true without a sufficient reason for its being so and not otherwise.”

More recently, the philosopher Richard Swinburne looked at the issue more inductively, writing,

There is quite a chance that if there is a God he will make something of the finitude and complexity of a universe. It is very unlikely that a universe would exist uncaused, but rather more likely that God would exist uncaused. The existence of the universe…can be made comprehensible if we suppose that it is brought about by God.

4) Something had to have designed the Universe

The Design Argument, or teleological argument, suggests we live in a Universe that surely had to be designed. The cosmos, goes the argument, exhibits orderliness and (apparent) purpose — for example, everything within the universe adheres to the laws of physics, and many things within it are correlated with one another in a way that appears purposeful. As William Paley argued, just as the existence of a watch indicates the presence of an intelligent mind, the existence of the universe and various phenomena within it indicates the presence of an even greater intelligence, namely God.
Needless to say, this line of argumentation was far more compelling prior to the advent of naturalism (the idea that everything can be explained without the benefit of supernatural intervention) and Darwinian evolution. Indeed, Darwin served as a kind of death knell to the Design Argument, at least as far as the biological realm is concerned. We know that the human eye — in all its apparent complexity and purpose — is not the product of a designer, but rather the painstaking result of variation and selection.
But the Design Argument isn’t entirely dead yet. The exquisite fine-tuning of the “biophilic universe” has lead some to conclude there is in fact a greater intelligence at work. To counter this line of reasoning, however, philosophers say we should simply defer to the anthropic principle, which is interesting because theists say the same thing!

5) Consciousness proves that immaterial entities exist

We still don’t have a working theory of consciousness, giving rise to the notorious Hard Problem. Indeed, subjective awareness, or qualia, is quite unlike anything we normally deal with in our otherwise material universe. The weirdness of consciousness, and our inability to understand it, has given rise to the notion of substance dualism, also known as Cartesian dualism, which describes two fundamental kinds of stuff: the mental and the material. Dualists say that material on its own is incapable of producing qualia — one’s capacity to have internal thoughts, subjective awareness, and feelings.

Theists have used substance dualism to make the claim for an independent “realm” of existence that’s distinct from the physical world. It’s a scenario similar to the one experience by Neo in “The Matrix”; his mental experiences occurred in a realm separate from the one that hosted his body. Theistic philosophers have taken this idea to the next level, using it to infer the existence of otherworldly or immaterial entities, including God. It’s a bit of a stretch, and an argument that could use a lot more evidence.

6) We’re living in a computer simulation run by hacker gods

God is in the eye of the beholder. Unlike Anselm’s take on God as something “that which nothing greater can be conceived,” gods can also consist of entities vastly beyond our comprehension, reach, and control. If the Simulation Hypothesis is true, and we’re the product of posthuman ancestors (or some unknown entity), we simply have no choice but to recognize them as gods. They’re running the show, and our collective (or even individual) behavior may be monitored — or even controlled — by them. These hacker gods would be akin the gnostic gods of yesteryear — powerful entities doing their own thing, and without our best interests in mind.

7) Aliens are our gods

We have yet to make contact with an extraterrestrial intelligence, but that doesn’t mean they’re not out there. A possible solution to the Fermi Paradox is the notion of directed panspermia — the idea that aliens spark life on other planets, like sending spores or probes to fertile planets, and then leave, or monitor and control the process covertly. By definition, therefore, they would be like gods to us.
This idea has been addressed many times in scifi, including the “Star Trek: The Next Generation” episode “The Chase”, in which a god-like species is responsible for all life in the Alpha Quadrant, or Ridley Scott’s “Prometheus,” in which an alien can be seen seeding the primordial Earth with life. Even Arthur C. Clarke’s “2001″ is a take on this idea, with the monoliths instigating massive evolutionary leaps.

The 7 Most Intriguing Philosophical Arguments for the Existence of God

Where Do We Come From?


Nietzsche said God is dead, but here are seven fascinating and provocative philosophical arguments for the existence of God.

This article originally appeared on io9.com, and is reprinted here with their permission.

Nietzsche is famous for saying that God is dead, but news of The Almighty’s demise may have been greatly exaggerated. Here are some of the most fascinating and provocative philosophical arguments for the existence of God.

To be clear, these are philosophical arguments. They’re neither rooted in religious scripture nor any kind of scientific observation or fact. Many of these arguments, some of which date back thousands of years, serve as interesting intellectual exercises, teasing apart what we think we know about the universe and our place within it from what we think we’re capable of knowing. Other arguments, like the last two listed, are attempts to reconcile questions that currently plague scientists and philosophers.
Now, none of these arguments make a definitive case for the existence of God, and many of them are (fairly) easily debunked or problematized (as I’ll try to show). But at the very least, they offer considerable food for thought.

Finally, by “God” or “god,” we’re not talking about any specific religious deity. As this list shows, the term can encompass everything from a perfect, omnipotent being to something that can be considered even a bit banal.

1) The very notion of an all-perfect being means God has to exist

This is the classic ontological, or a priori, argument. It was first articulated in 1070 by St. Anselm, who argued that because we have a conception of an all-perfect being — which he defined as “that than which nothing greater can be conceived” — it has to exist. In his essay “Proslogion,” St. Anselm conceived of God as a being who possesses all conceivable perfection. But if this being “existed” merely as an idea in our minds, then it would be less perfect than if it actually existed. So it wouldn’t be as great as a being who actually existed, something that would thus contradict our definition of God — a being who’s supposed to be all-perfect. Thus, God must exist.

Okay, admittedly, this sounds a bit weird by modern standards. Actually, it even sounded weird back then; Gaunilo of Marmoutiers ripped apart Anselm’s idea by asking people to conceive of an island “more excellent” than any other island, revealing the flaws in this type of argumentation. Today, we know that this type of a priori argument (i.e., pure deduction) is grossly limited, often tautological, and utterly fails to take empirical evidence into account.

But surprisingly, it was a position defended by none other than Rene Descartes. His take on the matter is a bit more illustrative; Descartes, in his “Fifth Meditation,” wrote that the conception of a perfect being who lacks existence is like imagining a triangle whose interior angles don’t sum to 180 degrees (he was big on the notion of innate ideas and the doctrine of clear and distinct perception). So, because we have the idea of a supremely perfect being, we have to conclude that a supremely perfect being exists; to Descarte, God’s existence was just as obvious, logical, and self-evident as the most basic mathematical truths.

2) Something must have caused the Universe to exist

Philosophers call this one the First-Cause Argument, or the Cosmological Argument, and early advocates of this line of reasoning included Plato, Aristotle, and St. Thomas Aquinas. It’s predicated on the assumption that every event must have a cause, and that cause in turn must have a cause, and on and on and on. Assuming there’s no end to this regression of causes, this succession of events would be infinite. But an infinite series of causes and events doesn’t make sense (a causal loop cannot exist, nor a causal chain of infinite length). There’s got to be something — some kind of first cause — that is itself uncaused. This would require some kind of “unconditioned” or “supreme” being — which the philosophers call God.

I’m sure you’ve already come up with your own objections to the First-Cause Argument, including the issue of a first-causer having to have its own cause. Also, infinity does in fact appear to be a fundamental quality of the universe. All this said, however, cosmologists are still struggling to understand the true nature of time and what “caused” the Big Bang to happen in the first place.

3) There has to be something rather than nothing

Called the Cosmological Argument from Contingency, this is a slightly different take on the First-Cause Argument. The German philosopher Gottfried Leibniz put it best when he wrote,

Why is there something rather than nothing? The sufficient reason … is found in a substance which … is a necessary being bearing the reason for its existence within itself.

Because it’s impossible for only contingent beings to exist, he argued, a necessary being must exist — a being we call God. Writing in “Monadology,” he wrote that “no fact can be real or existing and no statement true without a sufficient reason for its being so and not otherwise.”

More recently, the philosopher Richard Swinburne looked at the issue more inductively, writing,

There is quite a chance that if there is a God he will make something of the finitude and complexity of a universe. It is very unlikely that a universe would exist uncaused, but rather more likely that God would exist uncaused. The existence of the universe…can be made comprehensible if we suppose that it is brought about by God.

4) Something had to have designed the Universe

The Design Argument, or teleological argument, suggests we live in a Universe that surely had to be designed. The cosmos, goes the argument, exhibits orderliness and (apparent) purpose — for example, everything within the universe adheres to the laws of physics, and many things within it are correlated with one another in a way that appears purposeful. As William Paley argued, just as the existence of a watch indicates the presence of an intelligent mind, the existence of the universe and various phenomena within it indicates the presence of an even greater intelligence, namely God.
Needless to say, this line of argumentation was far more compelling prior to the advent of naturalism (the idea that everything can be explained without the benefit of supernatural intervention) and Darwinian evolution. Indeed, Darwin served as a kind of death knell to the Design Argument, at least as far as the biological realm is concerned. We know that the human eye — in all its apparent complexity and purpose — is not the product of a designer, but rather the painstaking result of variation and selection.
But the Design Argument isn’t entirely dead yet. The exquisite fine-tuning of the “biophilic universe” has lead some to conclude there is in fact a greater intelligence at work. To counter this line of reasoning, however, philosophers say we should simply defer to the anthropic principle, which is interesting because theists say the same thing!

5) Consciousness proves that immaterial entities exist

We still don’t have a working theory of consciousness, giving rise to the notorious Hard Problem. Indeed, subjective awareness, or qualia, is quite unlike anything we normally deal with in our otherwise material universe. The weirdness of consciousness, and our inability to understand it, has given rise to the notion of substance dualism, also known as Cartesian dualism, which describes two fundamental kinds of stuff: the mental and the material. Dualists say that material on its own is incapable of producing qualia — one’s capacity to have internal thoughts, subjective awareness, and feelings.

Theists have used substance dualism to make the claim for an independent “realm” of existence that’s distinct from the physical world. It’s a scenario similar to the one experience by Neo in “The Matrix”; his mental experiences occurred in a realm separate from the one that hosted his body. Theistic philosophers have taken this idea to the next level, using it to infer the existence of otherworldly or immaterial entities, including God. It’s a bit of a stretch, and an argument that could use a lot more evidence.

6) We’re living in a computer simulation run by hacker gods

God is in the eye of the beholder. Unlike Anselm’s take on God as something “that which nothing greater can be conceived,” gods can also consist of entities vastly beyond our comprehension, reach, and control. If the Simulation Hypothesis is true, and we’re the product of posthuman ancestors (or some unknown entity), we simply have no choice but to recognize them as gods. They’re running the show, and our collective (or even individual) behavior may be monitored — or even controlled — by them. These hacker gods would be akin the gnostic gods of yesteryear — powerful entities doing their own thing, and without our best interests in mind.

7) Aliens are our gods

We have yet to make contact with an extraterrestrial intelligence, but that doesn’t mean they’re not out there. A possible solution to the Fermi Paradox is the notion of directed panspermia — the idea that aliens spark life on other planets, like sending spores or probes to fertile planets, and then leave, or monitor and control the process covertly. By definition, therefore, they would be like gods to us.
This idea has been addressed many times in scifi, including the “Star Trek: The Next Generation” episode “The Chase”, in which a god-like species is responsible for all life in the Alpha Quadrant, or Ridley Scott’s “Prometheus,” in which an alien can be seen seeding the primordial Earth with life. Even Arthur C. Clarke’s “2001″ is a take on this idea, with the monoliths instigating massive evolutionary leaps.

Source: Whole Universe

10 Inspiring Sages with 10 Inspiring Messages By Shift

Art by Samuel Farrand

Art by Samuel Farrand

Throughout the ages there have been notable luminaries of humanity that have experienced a transformational harmonization initiated by the vectors of human becoming. We can look up to these sages for inspiration that will cultivate courage, will, and determination to experience an inner transformation of our consciousness. Although there are quite a few individuals that we can look to for sage-like guidance, these ten both ancient and present-day teachers will be focused on here, each with a message they streamed into the global mind in their own unique way. Let these words spark a shift within that will change the very way to see reality.

Thich Nhat Hanh

Thich Nhat Hanh

When you plant lettuce, if it does not grow well, you don’t blame the lettuce. You look for reasons it is not doing well. It may need fertilizer, or more water, or less sun. You never blame the lettuce.

Yet if we have problems with our friends or family, we blame the other person. But if we know how to take care of them, they will grow well, like the lettuce. Blaming has no positive effect at all, nor does trying to persuade using reason and argument.

That is my experience.

No blame, no reasoning, no argument, just understanding.

If you understand, and you show that you understand, you can love, and the situation will change.

Heraclitus

Heraclitus

The soul is dyed the color of its thoughts. Think only on those things that are in line with your principles and can bear the light of day. The content of your character is your choice. Day by day, what you do is who you become. Your integrity is your destiny – it is the light that guides your way.

It is wise to listen, not to me but to reason, and to confess that all things are one.

From out of all the many particulars comes oneness, and out of oneness come all the many particulars.

Pema Chödrön

Pema Chödrön

Nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know…nothing ever really attacks us except our own confusion. perhaps there is no solid obstacle except our own need to protect ourselves from being touched. Maybe the only enemy is that we don’t like the way reality is now and therefore wish it would go away fast. But what we find as practitioners is that nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know.

If we run a hundred miles an hour to the other end of the continent in order to get away from the obstacle, we find the very same problem waiting for us when we arrive. it just keeps returning with new names, forms, manifestations until we learn whatever it has to teach us about where we are separating ourselves from reality, how we are pulling back instead of opening up, closing down instead of allowing ourselves to experience fully whatever we encounter, without hesitating or retreating into ourselves.

Lao Tzu

Lao Tzu

If you understand others you are smart.
If you understand yourself you are illuminated.
If you overcome others you are powerful.
If you overcome yourself you have strength.
If you know how to be satisfied you are rich.
If you can act with vigor, you have a will.
If you don’t lose your objectives you can be long-lasting.
If you die without loss, you are eternal.

Ramana Maharshi

Ramana Maharshi

The attempt to destroy the ego or the mind through practices other than self-inquiry is just like the thief pretending to be a policeman to catch the thief, that is, himself.

Self-inquiry alone can reveal the truth that neither the ego nor the mind really exists, and enable one to realize the pure, undifferentiated being of the Self or the absolute.

Having realized the Self, nothing remains to be known, because it is perfect bliss, it is the all.

Sri Aurobindo

Sri Aurobindo

An aimless life is always a troubled life. Every individual should have an aim. But do not forget that the quality of your aim will depend the quality of your life. Your aim should be high and wide, generous and disinterested; this will make your life precious to yourself and to others.

Whatever your ideal, it cannot be perfectly realized unless you have realized perfection in yourself.

Tenzin Palmo

Tenzin Palmo

This endless film show is being played in our mind – moment to moment mind states – and that is projected out in front of us as our external reality. Now as long as we are fascinated by the movie in front of us, then we believe it and we become deeply involved in what appears to be happening. But if we look back and realize it’s just a mind-show that we are projecting, then even though we can still enjoy it, we are not going to be totally devastated if it’s a tragedy or completely engulfed if it’s a romance. We know it’s just a movie.

Mahatma Gandhi

Mahatma Gandhi

Keep your thoughts positive because your thoughts become your words.
Keep your words positive because your words become your behavior.
Keep your behavior positive because your behavior becomes your habits.
Keep your habits positive because your habits become your values.
Keep your values positive because your values become your destiny.

Jiddu Krishnamurti

Jiddu Krishnamurti

We seek happiness through things, through relationship, through thoughts, ideas. So things, relationship, and ideas become all-important and not happiness. When we seek happiness through something, then the thing becomes of greater value than happiness itself. When stated in this manner, the problem sounds simple and it is simple. We seek happiness in property, in family, in name; then property, family, idea become all important, for then happiness is sought through a means, and then the means destroys the end.

Can happiness be found through any means, through anything made by the hand or by the mind? Things, relationship, and ideas are so transparently impermanent, we are ever made unhappy by them…Things are impermanent, they wear out and are lost; relationship is constant friction and death awaits; ideas and beliefs have no stability, no permanency. We seek happiness in them and yet do not realize their impermanency. So sorrow becomes our constant companion and overcoming it our problem.

To find out the true meaning of happiness, we must explore the river of self-knowledge. Self-knowledge is not an end in itself. Is there a source to a stream? Every drop of water from the beginning to the end makes the river. To imagine that we will find happiness at the source is to be mistaken. It is to be found where you are on the river of self knowledge.

Thubten Chodron

Thubten Chodron

Is it possible to eliminate our anger forever? Yes, it is, because anger is a false mind, an attitude based on a misconception. Anger is generated when we project negative qualities onto people and things. We misinterpret situations so they appear harmful to us. Absorbed in our own projections, we mistake them for the qualities of other people and get angry at what we ourselves have superimposed on them. The tragedy is that we’re not aware of this process, and mistakenly believe the rude, insensitive person we’re perceiving really exists out there.

Source: Shift

Paul is the founder & director of SHIFT>, a conscious evolution guide, author of The Creation of a Consciousness Shift, intentional evolutionary & celebrator of life working to provide an integral role in the positive social transformation of humanity.

Ken Wilber: What is the meaning of life?


by Ken Wilber: There are so many different ways to answer that, and of course there are so many different answers that have been given over the decades, centuries, and millennia. It’s probably the ultimate human question.

The simplest answer is that the meaning of life is to realize ultimate unity, to realize the ultimate Ground of Being, to realize, in a direct immediate experience, Godhead or Spirit or Brahman or Tao. And that stands as a unique meaning among all the various meanings that have been offered, because many meanings are referred to what the traditions would call “relative truth”—they can go from fairly low life meanings to fairly noble meanings, but they’re all relative. And so it can go from “the meaning of life is to make as much money as you can,” or “to be as famous as you can,” or “to get as much power as you can.” Then, moving up a little higher, “the meaning of life is to find love and have love as an overpowering force in your life,” “to find meaning in general—to discover a particular value or a series of values that you find very important and that add meaning to your life and add a grace and joy to your life.” And these include everything from belongingness all the way up to group identities and finding a community that shares your values. And then there’s the idea that the meaning of life is to increase your knowledge, and therefore to become more educated and to learn more and more about the world itself. All of this is going to expand your psyche and even your soul, and yet all of those are still relative truths—they come into being, they exist in time for a particular period, and then they disappear.

But for traditions that divide truth into two truths, “relative truth” and “ultimate truth”, those are all relative. Ultimate truth is essentially very simple and similar however it appears, although the wording can vary a little here and there. It is to discover and to find the ultimate reality of life, the ultimate Ground of All Being, the ultimate is-ness or thusness or suchness of all reality, the goal and the source of all manifestation itself. But whatever it is, it’s an absolute: it’s absolute being, absolute consciousness, absolute happiness, absolute joy. It is a timeless realization. It’s the discovery of that reality which is so all-pervasive and all-pervading that it is ever-present in your own awareness. And so you can’t really accomplish it or achieve it or reach it, you can only recognize it.

So this recognition of ultimate reality becomes the primary goal or aim or meaning of life in any sort of ultimate sense. And the trick about this, unlike all of the relative meanings, truths, goals, and values, is that you can achieve all of the relative aims and goals and purposes in life and so on—if you want to have more belonging in your life, you can simply go out and start making friends and looking for loved ones and practicing expanding community; if you want more self-actualization you can take up workshops and you can go to a fairly self-actualized state. But when you are looking for the Ground of All Being, the analogy of the ocean and the waves is often used: you have the ocean, and then you have these waves coming in, and the waves represent relative truth. You can surf the waves—you can go out and wait, and a small wave starts to form, and you get on it and it gets very big, and you’re riding it, and then it dies down and you get off, and that was the ride.

So all of these relative truths and relative states of consciousness and relative states of being are something like a wave that you can capture and that you can experience precisely because it’s different from other waves. And certain waves are bigger than other waves, so you can go out looking to catch a big wave, looking to have a bigger experience and a bigger meaning in life. But the ground of all of these waves, the ocean itself, is just pure wetness, and wetness is equally present in every wave. A big wave isn’t wetter than a small wave; they’re both equally wet.

So if you’re looking for the suchness or the is-ness or the wetness of a wave, then that’s something that has to be ever-present in every wave of experience that you have. One wave doesn’t have more of it than another—any wave that you experience has the same amount of wetness, the same amount of suchness, the same amount of thusness. So all of the other forms of value, and all of the other kinds of meditation that you can do to get you in a specific state of consciousness, none of those work for the ultimatestate of consciousness, because it is radically ever-present. And it is the wetness that is equally present at every point in the ocean, and equally present in every wave in the ocean.

And so the practices here are called practices of recognition: you simply have to recognize the ever-present wetness. You don’t have to go looking for it, you don’t have to try to find it, you don’t have to get from a small wave to a big wave in order to get wet—all you have to do is just lie back and get covered in water, covered in wetness.

And so it’s precisely the unattainability of the ultimate meaning of life that can make it so paradoxically difficult to realize. Many of the Tibetan schools, for example, refer to it as being too simple to believe, and too easy to grasp. It’s precisely because we’re constantly searching for it that we cannot find it, as the search reinforces the assumption that it’s not present. So every time you’re searching for it, you’re just reinforcing its imaginary absence, because you’re reinforcing the assumption that it’s not there. But all you have to do is stop searching, stop grasping, stop seeking, and simply fall off a log into the water, and recognize what is ever-present and all-pervading.

The Prajñāpāramitā sutras in Buddhism, for example, constantly repeat over and over and over that if you could just realize the unattainability of prajñā, of enlightenment, then you would already be enlightened. So realizing its unavailability is another way of recognizing its ever-present nature.

One of my root teachers in Dzogchen kept the door open to his bedroom and you could just kind of go in and sit in the corner and watch him talk to students, and I used to do that a lot. And probably the most common experience would be somebody coming in and saying, “I finally got it! I was just sitting there meditating, and all of a sudden waves of love and bliss started pouring over me, and I just felt one with everything that was arising! And I still feel that; I’m absolutely blown away by that experience, and it was just right there!”

And the teacher would listen, and he would say, “Well that’s nice, but tell me something—did this experience have a beginning?” And they would say, “Yeah, about a half hour ago, I was just sitting there and nothing was happening and then POW, all of a sudden it just happened!” And the teacher would say, “Well that’s fine, but I want you to go back and find that which doesn’t have a beginning.”

So it’s something that is already present, fully present. 100% of the Awakened Mind, 100% of Christ Consciousness, 100% of the Supreme Identity is present in your awareness right now, and it’s simply a matter of recognizing this ever-present awareness. That is the key to waking up to this ultimate meaning of life, and not just the relative meaning of life. And that’s the difference between relative meaning and ultimate meaning: relative meaning has a beginning in time, ultimate meaning doesn’t. It’s ever-present. And that’s why Zen will say, “Show me your original face, the face you had before your parents were born.” When you first hear that, you go, “What does that mean? What face did I have before my parents were born? I mean, I wasn’t born!” But “before Abraham was, I Am”—and that “I AMness” is ever-present. It’s the wetness of all of the waves. You don’t have to think, “where was ‘I AMness’ ten years ago?” It’s exactly where it is now, it’s this feeling of this I AMness, of being “I Am”, and that I AMness is that fundamental wetness of all experience, of all manifestation, of all waves in the entire universe.

And that’s the key to ultimate meaning in life. It can’t be achieved, it can’t be accomplished, it can’t be reached, it can’t be attained, it can’t be sought, it can’t be found. It’s always already the case, and it’s fully present, self-liberated, and self-existing from moment to moment to moment. For all of the other meanings you can take up some sort of practice, you can take up some sort of activity, you can go out and work on them—you can work hard to achieve, you can accomplish them, you can reach them. And there is nothing the matter with that, that’s absolutely fine. But it’s not ultimate. It’s not absolute. So tease apart that which you get by seeking through time, versus that which you recognize in the timeless present as always simply being the case. And that is the ultimate meaning of life.

Roger Walsh and Ken Wilber share a detailed exploration of Integral health and wellness. Together they outline a comprehensive guide to healthy living, offering some incredibly simple and practical ways to help increase your overall health, happiness, and vitality.

Source: Patheos

Adyashanti – Perceiving Your Personal Philosophy


Published on Oct 27, 2016

http://adyashanti.org – Adyashanti speaks to the philosophy that you bring to your everyday life. What thoughts, beliefs, and opinions are you referencing from your past that are—consciously or unconsciously—informing your present experience? How are you interacting with life? Your own personal philosophy is a lens that you view life through, and it interprets and colors all of your experiences, creating your life. Adyashanti offers up the question: What philosophy am I entertaining at this moment right now? These are the profound inquiries and issues that Adyashanti will address in his study course, “The Philosophy of Enlightenment.”

Video Excerpted From: “The Philosophy of Enlightenment” Study Course – Exercise 1.

Quotes from this video:

“Just begin to examine this whole sense that every moment of relationship, we’re actually unconsciously bringing our philosophy of life into that moment.”

“You start to see that your philosophy of life, if it’s not in alignment with the unfolding of life, will cause conflict.”

“Take these little moments throughout the day, and drop this question into your mind: What philosophy am I living by right now? What set of opinions and beliefs am I living by? What set of past experiences am I viewing the current moment through?”

“Our own personal philosophy—about our self, others, and life—these aren’t just abstract ideas that float around in our mind. They’re actually ideas that we perceive through; they dictate the way that we experience life.”

I Am Not I by Jacob Needleman (Author)

Seeking to reconcile the split between our inner child and our adult self, eminent philosopher and religious scholar Jacob Needleman evokes the ancient spiritual tradition of a deep dialogue between a guiding wisdom figure and a seeker. The elder offers an initiation to a younger self, an initiation the author feels is missing from our culture. Rendered as a stage play, the conversation between the 80-year-old author and his younger selves unfolds, and an ambiguity emerges as to whether this is strictly the author’s internal dialogue or whether the younger self may be nurturing a rebirth of the author.

On one level, I Am Not I brings younger readers (teenagers and young adults) face to face with powerful spiritual and philosophical ideas. But as the book progresses, the dialogue delves into questions and insights that carry astonishing new hope and vision for every man and woman, challenging our culture’s accepted—and often toxic—ideas about humanity’s place in a living universe.

Jacob Needleman is a philosopher, author, and religious scholar. Educated at Harvard University, Yale University, and the University of Freiburg, he teaches philosophy at San Francisco State University. He is the author of The New Religions, a pioneering study of the new American spirituality, The Wisdom of Love, Money and the Meaning of Life, A Sense of the Cosmos, Lost Christianity, The Heart of Philosophy, The Way of the Physician, Time and the Soul, Sorcerers: A Novel, The American Soul, Why Can’t We Be Good? , and The Essential Marcus Aurelius.

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Jacob Needleman

“Who Am I? Why Am I Here?”
A conversation with Professor Needleman at TNS: The New School at Commonweal

Secrets of the Eternal Moon Phase Goddesses: Meditations on Desire, Relationships and the Art of Being Broken by Julie Peters (Author)

Follow the Moon Goddesses through an empowering practice that embraces relationship, desire, change, grief and brokenness in all its forms.

There is a unique goddess for each of the sixteen nights of the moon phases, according to Tantric mythology. They are the Nityas, or Eternal Moon Phase Goddesses, and they trace a sexual narrative that moves from desire to connection to the moment afterward where you must separate again from your lover. Metaphorically, this cycle asks larger questions about our relationships, not only with our lovers but also with our communities and with ourselves. We seek answers to these questions―and find more questions―by bringing together ancient yogic wisdom and modern research into psychology and sociology.

This book will also introduce you to the Goddess Akhilandeshwari, whose name means “She Who Is Never Not Broken.” Through her you learn about the secret empowerment of feeling totally broken down, because this is the moment you get to choose how to put yourself back together. Then, through the Eternal Moon Phase Goddesses―and nightly meditation and journaling practices―you will explore the spirituality of desire, the vulnerability of intimacy, the possibilities of healing from trauma within intimate relationships, the anxiety of instinct and more.

Part spiritual practice handbook, part introduction to Tantric traditions, part personal growth guide, this book is for anyone who wants to embrace the confusion, loss, loneliness, desire and pleasure that make up the spectrum of human experience―and better understand who they already are.

Julie Peters is a yoga teacher and writer on topics of yoga and wellness. She is a biweekly columnist for Spirituality & Health. She has represented Vancouver twice in the Women of the World Poetry Slam. She is co-owner and operator of Ocean and Crow Yoga Studio in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Julie Peters is available to speak on the following topics:

Yoga and Feminism
Spirituality and Desire
Bringing Yoga Philosophy into Modern Western Spirituality
The Sixteen Moon Phase Goddesses
Myth and Narrative in Spiritual Practices

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Huston Smith: Wisdomkeeper: Living The World’s Religions: The Authorized Biography of a 21st Century Spiritual by Dana Sawyer (Author)

Huston Smith is recognized and revered as the preeminent teacher of world religions while being a prolific author and scholar. His bestselling The World’s Religions, sold more than two million copies and is still the most popular introduction to comparative religion. Huston Smith followed a lifelong spiritual quest that led him around the world many times.

He studied the world’s religions and mystical traditions directly with Aldous Huxley, D. T. Suzuki, J. Krishnamurti, Alan Watts, Paul Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhr, the Dalai Lama, Joseph Campbell, Ram Dass, and a host of others. Huston, as a renowned philosopher of religion, taught at Washington University, M.I.T., Syracuse University, and the University of California–Berkeley, and during his career helped shape the contemporary face of comparative religion, interfaith dialogue, and religious tolerance. As a seeker, he became a citizen of the world, plunging into its various spiritual traditions. His many insights and adventures fill this compelling and edifying book, the authorized biography of a 21st-century spiritual giant.

Dana Sawyer is a professor of religion and philosophy at the Maine College of Art and a lecturer on world religions for the Chaplaincy Institute of Maine. He is the author of a critically acclaimed biography of Aldous Huxley. He lives in Portland, Maine.

Dana Sawyer – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Dana Sawyer was born in Jonesport, Maine in 1951. Currently he is a full-time professor of religion and philosophy at the Maine College of Art and an adjunct professor of Asian religions at the Bangor Theological Seminary. He is the author of numerous published papers and books, including Aldous Huxley: A Biography, which Laura Huxley described as, “Out of all the biographies written about Aldous, this is the only one he would have actually liked.”

Sawyer has been involved in fund-raising activities for the Siddhartha School Project in Stak, Ladakh, north India, for more than ten years and is currently vice-president of the Board of Trustees. This project has resulted in the construction of an elementary/ middle school for underprivileged Buddhist children that has been visited twice by the Dalai Lama, who holds it as a model for blending traditional and Western educational ideals. Much of his work for this project has involved translating at lectures for (and teaching with) the school’s founder, Geshe Lobzang Tsetan, who is currently the abbot of the Panchen Lama’s monastery in Mysore, India.

Sawyer’s interest in the phenomenon of Neo-Hindu and Buddhist groups in America led him to become a popular lecturer on topics of interest to these groups. He has taught at the Kripalu Center (Lenox, MA), the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies (Barre, MA), the Vedanta Society of Southern California (Hollywood, CA), the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California, and other such venues. This work has also brought him into contact with several interesting and important figures in this field, including Stanislav Grof, Andrew Harvey, Huston Smith, Laura Huxley, Stephen Cope, and Alex Grey.

Sawyer has been to India eleven times, most recently while on sabbatical during the winter and spring of 2005, and has traveled extensively throughout the subcontinent: Nepal, Pakistan, Sikkim, Thailand, Cambodia, Hong Kong, and Japan.

Related to academic work Sawyer has lectured at the Kyoto University of Foreign Studies, Banaras Hindu University, the University of Riga, Latvia, the Huntington Library, and at colleges and conferences throughout the United States (interview footage of Sawyer from the Riga conference was featured in a British documentary, “Brand New World,” on the dangers of consumer culture). In August, 2005, Sawyer was a participant in the by-invitation-only conference on “Government, Education, and Religion” at the Oxford Roundtable, Lincoln College, Oxford University. He is a member of two academic societies: the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy (SACP) and the International Aldous Huxley Society, centered at the University of Munster in Germany.

Current Project: Sawyer is working closely with Huston Smith, noted scholar and author of The World’s Religions, to write his authorized biography.

The Ultimate Truth, Knowledge & Wisdom by Sanjay Goel (Author)

This book discusses the most fundamental aspects of life such as the purpose of our existence, human nature and the effect of thinking and philosophy on our psychological and physical health. It goes on to detail the various methods of meditation and their effect on physical health as well as on the ultimate quest to reach the Supreme.

It deals with death, the soul, ancient Vedic philosophy, non-violence, the effect of philosophy on relationships and achievements in life, dreams and detachment.

It guides a person on how to lead a balanced life and attain the ultimate purpose of human existence, which is peace and bliss. It explains that the human mind is always disturbed, restless and wandering in the past, present and future. Due to ignorance and attachments, there is the false belief that these materialistic objects would give more satisfaction and happiness than at present or more than what one already has. The more he obtains these objects, the more man’s desires increase, like adding fuel to fire and he is always torn between the dualities of life–death, happiness–sorrow, gain–loss, good–evil and so on.

Only that person who understands that there is nothing to achieve or lose in this world can rise above these dualities, as the two sides of dualities like life–death, happiness–sorrow, gain–loss, good–evil and so on shall always be equal to each other, and one cannot exist without an equal amount of the other. The person who understands the above truth knows that he is neither living nor dead, neither happy nor unhappy, neither good nor evil and so on. He rises above these dualities, does all his duties in life without any desire or aversion and attains ultimate peace and bliss.

Sanjay Goel is a practicing Advocate of the Supreme Court of India, who specializes in Human Rights and Public Interest matters. Since his childhood, he has been keenly interested in spirituality, philosophy and ancient Vedic knowledge, and has devoted a lot of time on the research of these subjects. The observations in the book are based upon his own personal experiences and research on the subject. A large number of similar articles written by him have already been published in ‘The Speaking Tree’ (Times of India) and The Hindustan Times Newspaper.

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The Ultimate Truth, Knowledge and Wisdom

Published on Feb 16, 2016

What is the purpose of life? Do worldly success, material comforts, health and wealth ensure happiness and peace?

What are good and bad Karmas? What causes all that happens to us in this life… our karma or fate?

Is there a state called death? Is there rebirth after death?

Is everything preordained, or are we responsible for our doings?

How can we achieve ultimate peace and bliss?

These are some of the questions that we keep asking ourselves all the time…

Drawing from the wisdom of ancient Vedic philosophy and personal experience, the answers to these and many more such oft repeated questions are touched upon, going on to cover the gist of the Vedantas and the supremacy of Karma Yoga, interspersed with practical tips for modern day life, such as the qualities of a good leader, who is an ideal Guru, the effects of philosophy on health, benefits of meditation, etc…

The Path: What Chinese Philosophers Can Teach Us About the Good Life By Michael Puett and Christine Gross-Loh

Harvard’s most popular professor explains how thinkers from Confucius to Xunzi can transform our daily lives

For the first time an award-winning Harvard professor shares his wildly popular course on classical Chinese philosophy, showing you how these ancient ideas can guide you on the path to a good life today.

Why is a course on ancient Chinese philosophers one of the most popular at Harvard?

It’s because the course challenges all our modern assumptions about what it takes to flourish. This is why Professor Michael Puett says to his students, “The encounter with these ideas will change your life.” As one of them told his collaborator, author Christine Gross-Loh, “You can open yourself up to possibilities you never imagined were even possible.”

These astonishing teachings emerged two thousand years ago through the work of a succession of Chinese scholars exploring how humans can improve themselves and their society. And what are these counterintuitive ideas? Good relationships come not from being sincere and authentic, but from the rituals we perform within them. Influence comes not from wielding power but from holding back. Excellence comes from what we choose to do, not our natural abilities. A good life emerges not from planning it out, but through training ourselves to respond well to small moments. Transformation comes not from looking within for a true self, but from creating conditions that produce new possibilities.

In other words, The Path upends everything we are told about how to lead a good life. Above all, unlike most books on the subject, its most radical idea is that there is no path to follow in the first place—just a journey we create anew at every moment by seeing and doing things differently.

Sometimes voices from the past can offer possibilities for thinking afresh about the future. –

Michael Puett is Professor of Chinese History at Harvard University and has lectured widely at the world’s leading universities. His course in Chinese Philosophy has been so successful that his classes have been moved to the largest, 1000-seat lecture hall available at Harvard.

Christine Gross-Loh is a freelance journalist and author. Her writing has appeared in a number of publications including The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, and the Huffington Post. She has a PhD from Harvard University in East Asian history.

EXTRACT
In this extract, Michael and Christine explain how the book of Zhuangzi encourages us to shift our perspectives. And, in this Year of the Monkey, it starts with an appropriately simian-heavy parable…

To wear yourself out to unify everything without understanding that they are the same—this is called “three in the morning.” What do I mean by that? A monkey trainer was handing out nuts, saying, “You get three in the morning, and four at night.” The monkeys were enraged. So he said, “All right, then, you get four in the morning and three at night.” The monkeys were thrilled. There was no difference between name and substance, but their happiness and anger were put into play. He simply shifted with them. This is how the sage harmonizes by using “right” and “wrong”—yet rests on Heaven’s wheel. This is called proceeding on two paths.

By now you probably understand how our conscious mind trips us up by clinging to arbitrary, distracting, and useless categories, as shown in the monkey example. There is no overall difference between “three in the morning and four at night” or its opposite, except in how we perceive them.

A radical shift in perspective allows us to view the world in the way that the Zhuangzi advocates. This is why it so often turns conventional wisdom on its head: in one story, a grievously disabled man lives his whole life begging for food. He is seen as pathetic, and yet he lives a long time, whereas other young men around him are conscripted into war. So who is the lucky one here?

Our conscious minds tend to focus on what “should be”— on what appears to be right. We think we know what is beautiful, what is large, what is virtuous, what is useful. Yet do we really understand how arbitrary the words and values we depend on actually are?

If a human sleeps in a damp place, his back aches and he becomes stiff. But is this true of a fish? If he resides in a tree, he is fearful and terrified. But is this true of a monkey? Which of these three, then, knows the correct place to live? Humans eat animals, deer eat grass, centipedes enjoy sweets, and hawks like mice. Which of these four knows what food is supposed to taste like? Monkeys mate with monkeys, deer with deer, and fish with fish. People say that Maoqiang and Lady Li are beautiful, but if a fish were to see them it would dart to the abyss, if birds saw them they would fly to the skies, if deer saw them they would gallop away. Which of these four knows what beauty is?

The problem is not simply that we have perspectives. So, after all, do the fish and the birds and the deer. The problem comes when we assume that our perspectives are universal, and we close off our minds. We create rigid distinctions and overly stable categories and values.

But what about categories that do seem clear, and values that seem unshakable and universal? Isn’t killing always wrong? How about robbing a bank? Imagine a robber who trains himself to pick locks flawlessly, break into a bank soundlessly, steal money, and escape without detection. If Zhuangzi is denying clear moral categories, then on what basis then could he ever say this is wrong? After all, isn’t the robber a perfect example of trained spontaneity?

What Zhuangzi would say, though, is that rigid distinctions lead to such situations in the first place. If you really were training yourself to flow with ‘the Way’, you wouldn’t be a robber. You wouldn’t kill anyone. A robber thinks in terms of distinctions from the start: he thinks in terms of my stuff, their stuff, I want this, I’ll take that. Someone who kills another is interrupting the flow of the transformation of things by prematurely ending life. For Zhuangzi, the argument against stealing, or killing, wouldn’t stem from the fact that they are immoral acts, but that they arise from making rigid distinctions.

Zhuangzi’s examples span the entire spectrum from prosaic to grand, but they are all about embracing life. You can embrace life by opening up yourself to see the task of ironing a shirt not as a tiresome chore but as an exercise in cultivating trained spontaneity; a head cold not as inconvenient but as a chance to cozy up in bed reading novels; a canceled wedding engagement not as heartbreak but as an opportunity for a new future. The Zhuangzi talks of those who have opened up their perspective fully. By embracing life, they have achieved true resonance with the Way. Metaphorically speaking, they are what Zhuangzi calls “true people.” They can “enter water without getting wet and fire without getting burned.”

Imagine what it would be like for little things and big things alike to cease to disturb us, instead becoming part of the excitement of life; things we find exciting and embrace. Imagine seeing things from all perspectives, and thus being able to understand that everything that happens is part of the process of flux and transformation. To return to Zhuangzi’s metaphor, with this change in perspective, we would become true people: able to walk through water without getting wet, through fire without getting burned.

Alan Watts – What Have you Left Out???


Published on Feb 6, 2016

Oneness Meditation Center: http://on.fb.me/VGjX0G ♥ My Website: http://ajfortuna.com ♥ Being Spiritually Awake: http://on.fb.me/1dKt09f ♥ Alan Wilson Watts (6 January 1915 – 16 November 1973) was a British-born American philosopher, writer, and speaker, best known as an interpreter and populariser of Eastern philosophy for a Western audience. Born in Chislehurst, England, he moved to the United States in 1938 and began Zen training in New York. Pursuing a career, he attended Seabury-Western Theological Seminary, where he received a master’s degree in theology. Watts became an Episcopal priest in 1945, then left the ministry in 1950 and moved to California, where he joined the faculty of the American Academy of Asian Studies.

Watts gained a large following in the San Francisco Bay Area while working as a volunteer programmer at KPFA, a Pacifica Radio station in Berkeley. Watts wrote more than 25 books and articles on subjects important to Eastern and Western religion, introducing the then-burgeoning youth culture to The Way of Zen (1957), one of the first bestselling books on Buddhism. In Psychotherapy East and West (1961), Watts proposed that Buddhism could be thought of as a form of psychotherapy and not a religion. He considered “Nature, Man, and Woman” (1958) to be, “from a literary point of view – the best book I have ever written.”[citation needed] He also explored human consciousness, in the essay “The New Alchemy” (1958), and in the book The Joyous Cosmology (1962).

Towards the end of his life, he divided his time between a houseboat in Sausalito and a cabin on Mount Tamalpais. Many of his books are now available in digital format and many of his recorded talks and lectures are available on the Internet. According to the critic Erik Davis, his “writings and recorded talks still shimmer with a profound and galvanizing lucidity.

The Path: What Chinese Philosophers Can Teach Us About the Good Life by Michael Puett (Author), Christine Gross-Loh (Author)

For the first time an award-winning Harvard professor shares the lessons from his wildly popular course on classical Chinese philosophy, showing you how these ancient ideas can guide you on the path to a good life today.

The lessons taught by ancient Chinese philosophers surprisingly still apply, and they challenge our fundamental assumptions about how to lead a fulfilled, happy, and successful life. Self-discovery, it turns out, comes through looking outward, not inward. Power comes from holding back. Good relationships come from small gestures. Spontaneity comes from practice. And excellence comes from what you choose to do, not your “natural” abilities.

Counterintuitive. Countercultural. Even revolutionary. These powerful ideas have made Professor Michael Puett’s course the third most popular at Harvard University in recent years, with enrollment surging every year since it was first offered in 2006. It’s clear students are drawn by a bold promise Professor Puett makes on the first day of class: “These ideas will change your life.” Now he offers his course to the world.

Michael Puett is the Walter C. Klein Professor of Chinese History in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations and Chair of the Committee on the Study of Religion at Harvard University. He is the recipient of a Harvard College Professorship for excellence in undergraduate teaching.

Christine Gross-Loh is a freelance journalist and author. Her writing has appeared in a number of publications including The Wall Street Journal, The Atlantic, and the Huffington Post. She has a PhD from Harvard University in East Asian history.

Professor Michael Puett on Zhuangzi in Relation to Confucius

Professor Michael Puett on Zhuangzi in Relation to Confucius

The Fifth Disciple: Choose Again and Find True Happiness by Cynthia Bove (Author)

This book correlates teachings from several profound texts, namely the spiritual philosophy of A Course in Miracles and a rendition of The Gospel of Thomas, a collection of Sayings from the time of Jesus. The hidden keys unearthed from these combined resources will help us delve deeper into the metaphysical meanings of life, and strive to answer universal spiritual questions that have eluded mankind’s awareness for generations. We will endeavor to understand our purpose in life and our reason for being.

Our aim is to methodically decipher how to draw closer to our Source, and to understand how to overcome past obstacles that have prevented that joyous reunion from occurring. As we embark upon the path of forgiveness our perceptions will change as to what we consider real and important. We become joyfully reacquainted with a different Guide than we have traveled with in the past, One who will smooth our way and make straight our path. With these keys in hand, we will gain the knowledge that enables us to see beyond form to the formless, and unite once again with the flawless Vision that sees our True Self as it really is.

Cynthia Bove‘ is a graduate of the City College of New York, with a degree in Sociology and a Minor in Psychology. She lives on Long Island with her family.

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Interview with Cynthia Bové, Author of The Fifth Disciple: Choose Again and Find True Happiness

Another book about The Gospel of Thomas! 🙂 I speak to Cynthia Bové, Author of The Fifth Disciple – an excellent book that covers the gist of A Course in Miracles and the links with The Gospel of Thomas.

http://acimexplained.com

In this innovative book, Cynthia Bove has taken the insightful spiritual philosophy of A Course in Miracles and correlated it with a profound collection of Sayings from the time of Jesus. These ancient Sayings had been buried in the desert for over sixteen hundred years before they were rediscovered in 1945.

Now the revelations from these combined resources can help us discover our purpose in life and our reason for being. Once again we will become happily reacquainted with a different Guide than we have traveled with in the past, One who will lovingly smooth our way and make straight our path.

As we studiously embark upon the path of forgiveness that is laid out before us, we will draw closer to our Source and overcome the obstacles that have prevented our joyous reunion from occurring. We will gain the knowledge that enables us to see beyond form to the formless, and unite once again with the flawless Vision that sees our True Self as it really is.

The Book of Secret Wisdom: The Prophetic Record of Human Destiny and Evolution by Zinovia Dushkova (Translator)

Hidden away for long millennia and accessible only to a few chosen ones, the oldest text of Tibetan origin uncovers what awaits humanity in The Book of Secret Wisdom.

The Book of Secret Wisdom includes a newly released excerpt from the million-year-old manuscript widely known as the Book of Dzyan. The book was originally written in Senzar, a Sanskrit-like language, and was translated by Dr. Zinovia Dushkova in 1995.

Far back in the 19th century, the Great Masters of Wisdom permitted Madame Blavatsky, the world-renowned figure of esoteric philosophy, to study the most ancient manuscripts secretly stored in Tibet. Her highly influential works based on those sacred texts have received praise from numerous prominent individuals including Mahatma Gandhi, Albert Einstein, Thomas Edison, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, and even Elvis Presley.

In 1889 Helena Blavatsky stated: “During the last quarter of every hundred years an attempt is made by those ‘Masters,’ of whom I have spoken, to help on the spiritual progress of humanity in a marked and definite way.” Blavatsky, who has made accurate predictions in advance of many scientific discoveries, was correct once again.

A century later in 1995, the Masters of Wisdom allowed Dr. Zinovia Dushkova to translate twelve new stanzas from the mysterious Book of Dzyan. However, unlike the nineteen stanzas of Dzyan published in Blavatsky’s masterwork, The Secret Doctrine, the new excerpt is translated in simple and understandable language accessible to everyone.

Through the poetical beauty of language, the new stanzas embrace not only the past, but also the present and future of both humanity and Earth. Furthermore, this new material shines light on the development of the Solar System and the Universe as a whole. Thus, these stanzas, supplemented with exclusive material available in The Book of Secret Wisdom, enable you to find answers to questions such as:

  • What is behind the processes currently affecting our planet, which manifest daily in anomalous weather, global warming, and natural disasters around the world?
  • Why does it seem that more and more evil is appearing every day, manifesting itself through growing conflicts all over the world?
  • What really happened in 1999 and 2012?
  • What is the Great Event expected to occur in 2017, and how does it depend upon the collective will of humanity?
  • What awaits humanity in the immediate future?
  • Why does it seem that time is speeding up?
  • What is the famous Philosopher’s Stone?
  • Why people are dying, and is there a chance to be immortal?
  • When will Armageddon happen?
  • What is the mission of our planet and of every being in the Universe?

Containing information and knowledge that has never appeared anywhere before, The Book of Secret Wisdom brings a heartwarming message of love and hope for the human race. However, Dr. Dushkova encourages readers to examine the evidence presented and then listen to their own heart alone. She states, “When you feel the words which are voiced here in the depths of your own soul, you may listen to yourself and trust what is said.”


Zinovia Vasilievna Dushkova, Ph.D., is a Russian author, poet, philosopher, historian, and traveller. She has been honoured with a number of awards, prizes, and commendations for her contribution to the spiritual development of society, and for excellence in the domain of scientific research into the ecology of consciousness. She is a Fellow of the European Academy of Natural Sciences and the European Scientific Society, both based in Hanover, Germany.

A seeker of ancient truths, Dr. Dushkova has always strived to find only one thing: Love. She has engaged in research in Asia, Africa, Europe, and North America for more than twenty years, acquiring the secret wisdom underlying all known religions and philosophies. She has stayed at remote Buddhist monasteries and secret Abodes hidden in mountains, deserts, and caves in Tibet, Mongolia, Nepal, and India, as well as other countries, where sacred scrolls and ancient manuscripts have been preserved. These are the places where her predecessors in esoteric philosophy, Helena Blavatsky and Helena Roerich, obtained their own wisdom. As a result, since 1997, nearly forty works by Dr. Dushkova have been published in Russia, Ukraine, Moldova, and France.

These works are all of a spiritual nature, having been recorded during her travels in the Himalayas, the Karakorum, the Nilgiri, the Gobi Desert, the Pyrenees, and beyond. They reflect a neat synthesis of science, religion, history, and philosophy. Underlying Dr. Dushkova’s poetry and prose, her fairy tales and legends, is a worldview full of wisdom and the cultural heritage of both the East and the West.

Her works are often described as “books full of Light.” Readers are attracted to the unusual depth, yet simplicity, of the author’s thought, the life-affirming notes which characterize each volume, and the beauty, poetry, and musicality of her language. Dr. Dushkova’s books are distinct from many others in that Good, Light, and Love — in their highest manifestation — consistently characterize her writings.

In her creative work, Dr. Zinovia Dushkova continually strives to reignite hope where it has disappeared, illuminate Love where it has died away, and add delight to life where its meaning has been lost. And indeed, her readers’ reactions show clearly that these books help people to learn. While assisting them to change themselves for the better, they also help them find purpose and meaning in life through establishing solutions to the universal questions and answers that vex us all.

For more information, please visit her website at: dushkova.com/en.

14 May 2009 — Newspaper “Stolitsa Komrat” Interview View Here

The Existence of God: A Philosophical Introduction by Yujin Nagasawa (Author)

Does God exist? What are the various arguments that seek to prove the existence of God? Can atheists refute these arguments? The Existence of God: A Philosophical Introduction assesses classical and contemporary arguments concerning the existence of God:

  • the ontological argument, introducing the nature of existence, possible worlds, parody objections, and the evolutionary origin of the concept of God
  • the cosmological argument, discussing metaphysical paradoxes of infinity, scientific models of the universe, and philosophers’ discussions about ultimate reality and the meaning of life
  • the design argument, addressing Aquinas’s Fifth Way, Darwin’s theory of evolution, the concept of irreducible complexity, and the current controversy over intelligent design and school education.

Bringing the subject fully up to date, Yujin Nagasawa explains these arguments in relation to recent research in cognitive science, the mathematics of infinity, big bang cosmology, and debates about ethics and morality in light of contemporary political and social events.

The book also includes fascinating insights into the passions, beliefs and struggles of the philosophers and scientists who have tackled the challenge of proving the existence of God, including Thomas Aquinas, and Kurt Gödel – who at the end of his career as a famous mathematician worked on a secret project to prove the existence of God.

The Existence of God: A Philosophical Introduction is an ideal gateway to the philosophy of religion and an excellent starting point for anyone interested in arguments about the existence of God.


Yujin Nagasawa is Professor of Philosophy and Co-Director of the John Hick Centre for Philosophy of Religion at the University of Birmingham in the UK. He is author of The Existence of God (Routledge, 2011) and God and Phenomenal Consciousness (Cambridge University Press, 2008), and editor/co-editor of three books: There’s Something About Mary: Essays on Phenomenal Consciousness and Frank Jackson’s Knowledge Argument (MIT Press, 2004), New Waves in Philosophy of Religion (Palgrave Macmillan, 2008), and Scientific Approaches to Philosophy of Religion (Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming). He was awarded the Philosophical Quarterly Essay Prize in 2007 and the John Templeton Award for Theological Promise in 2008. Yujin Nagasawa’s website: http://www.yujinnagasawa.com

LOOK INSIDE

Dr Yujin Nagasawa & Dr Deepak Chopra

Published on Aug 12, 2015

Perfect Being, God & Consciousness

Salma Hayek Makes Khalil Gibran’s The Prophet

Published on Aug 7, 2015

Salma Hayek joins Freeman Michaels and Clark Peterson on Cutting Edge Consciousness for a wonderful conversation about the depth of Khalil Gibran’s words. In this short clip, from the show about Salma and Clark’s new film The Prophet, Salma speaks very personally about how Khalil Gibran’s work has effected her life. Salma was introduced to Khalil Gibran by her grandfather and she has passed on the wisdom to her own daughter.

To view the entire Cutting Edge Consciousness show about The Prophet, please go to: https://youtu.be/Jm4fII0DPPo

To learn more about the film and find out where it is playing near you, please visit: http://www.gibransprophetmovie.com/


Kahlil Gibran’s The Prophet Official Trailer HD



Salma Hayek: ‘The Prophet’ Is ‘Hardest Thing I’ve Ever Done’ | TODAY


Published on May 1, 2015

Salma Hayek joins TODAY to talk about producing the animated film based on Kahlil Gibran’s “The Prophet,” as well as lending her voice to it.

The Book of I AM by Buttrfli Jones

Change occurs from the inside, outward. ‘The Book of I AM’ is a starting point to seeing ourselves the way that God intended us to.

From the Author
With this book, I wanted to ensure that my authenticity shined. I wanted this book to be true to who I was . . . I had to LIVE this message. I want the reader to feel that we share the same experiences and understand that they are not alone.
The Book of I AM is a journey that never ends, but after the rough places the road becomes much easier to travel.

Buttrfli Jones is a native of Kansas, a wife and a mother. She currently has an MBA and one day would like to pursue a Doctorate degree in Business. She states that she does not write for notoriety alone, but to make an impact in the lives of people who may not have a voice. She hopes that throughout her writing career, she is able to change lives and minds not only on a national level, but worldwide. Her major writing influence is Toni Morrison, and the person she most admires in life is her mother. She enjoys writing poetry, music, singing and reading.

READ HERE

Kwenzi House Cafe interview with Buttrfli Jones

Published on Mar 22, 2015

Me your host Muthah Earth is proud to present an interview with Buttrfli Jones regarding her new book THE BOOK OF I AM, as well as her other books. She gives me an insight of her mission to attract all backgrounds to her writing style. Check out what she has to say!

The Evidence for God: The Case for the Existence of the Spiritual Dimension by Keith Ward

‘It is remarkable how atheism is becoming fashionable. It has become almost compulsory to say that you do not believe in God. – I believe that science itself points in a very different direction. There is a huge amount of evidence for the reality of a spiritual dimension to the world.’ There is a level of being that is deeper than the physical universe, writes Keith Ward. It has purpose and value, and we can sometimes feel it and find in it resources of strength, hope, and inspiration. Through an exploration of six areas of human experience – the arts, morality, philosophy, science, religion and personal experience – Ward demonstrates the existence of more than simply physical facts. His evidence builds to an impressive argument for a ‘sense for the spiritual dimension’ that is beyond and yet expressed in and through physical facts.

Keith Ward is Regius Professor of Divinity Emeritus at the University of Oxford and Professorial Research Fellow at Heythrop College, London. He is a Fellow of the British Academy and has written many popular books on philosophy, religion and Christian theology.

Browse Here

The Evidence for God with Professor Keith Ward

Live from Wycliffe Hall, Oxford, Professor Keith Ward giving a lecture on the ‘Evidence for God’ and launch his new book, ‘The Evidence for God: The Case for the Existence of the Spiritual Dimension’.

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