A Spiritual Mystery: Does God Listen to Prayers? (Part III) – Deepak Chopra, M.D


It may sound odd at first, but there are ways to improve the chances that God will answer your prayer..
In the first and second post in this series, we saw that the whole subject of prayer is filled with assumptions and preconceptions. Once they are cleared away, a prayer turns out to be a special kind of intention. Therefore, the rules that apply to intentions, which are rules about consciousness, apply. Your prayer will be answered, or not, depending on events happening out of sight – but not out of mind. The mind furnishes the mechanics of making any intention come true.

This quick summary will raise eyebrows if someone denies that the inner and outer worlds are connected. (See the first and second posts in this series for the reasoning behind the union of these two domains of reality.) The world’s wisdom traditions don’t run into this obstacle, which is peculiar to modern materialism. Yet in a way it’s good to start with a blank slate. What makes any intention come true? Three vital elements are at work, as mentioned in the first post of this series:

How deep into the mind is the intention coming from?
How steady is your focus?
How fluid is your intention?
When you perfect these three things, the power of intention becomes real and useful. This is the teaching of Samyama, as it is described in Sanskrit. Let me treat each element in the way Vedanta prescribes.

Depth of Awareness Is Samadhi
Like a river that runs fast on the surface but much more slowly near the bottom, the mind is conceived of as both active and still, even though it’s the same mind. The stillness is present, for example, in the space between thoughts. When you are accustomed to experiencing your mind only through activity (i.e., sensations, images, feelings, and thoughts), the silent source of the mind has been missed. The whole point of Eastern meditation practices is to reacquaint a person with this source. The more often you dive into silent mind, the deeper your intentions are coming from when you aren’t meditating.

What helps Samadhi:

Meditation
Calm, peaceful surroundings
Lack of mental agitation
Absence of stress
Minimal distractions
Self-acceptance
Self-awareness
What hurts Samadhi: the opposite of the above

Steady Mental Focus Is Dharana
Calling up an intention is natural to everyone’s mind. The key is that the intention be one-pointed, that is, your desire doesn’t conflict with other desires or get dissipated in mental restlessness. To be alert, sharp, and clear should be the goal. This isn’t accomplished overnight, and yet there is nothing exotic to learn. We’ve all experienced moments of knowing exactly what we want and never losing focus as long as our desire holds our attention.

What helps Dharana:

Clear thinking
Acting purposefully
Not losing sight of the goal
Confidence
The ability to stick with a mental task
Follow-through
Diligence
What hurts Dharana:

Multi-tasking
Mental confusion
Conflicted desires
Lack of self-knowledge
Fantasy and daydreaming
Short attention span
A craving to escape the self
Fluid Awareness Is Dhyana
Although all the elements behind intention come naturally and are part of everyone’s mental makeup, there is a seeming contradiction between holding a steady focus (Dharana) and being in a flexible, fluid state of mind (Dhyana). It’s like asking water to be ice and liquid at the same time. But the mind isn’t an object or substance. It exhibits complementary states that seem opposite but actually work together.

In this case, an open mind that can adapt to any response is compatible with steady focus. No better example exists than playing a video game, where the player is fiercely intent of scoring points but must be open to every surprising, unexpected event in order to reach a high score. In everyday life, a desire is one-pointed at its inception, but you let it go and await whatever response comes to you. There is a skill involved: Learning to view the world “out there” as responsive to the signals you send to it from “in here.”

What helps Dhyana:

Being relaxed and easy
Mindfulness
Acceptance of things as they are
Putting a value on being
Trust
Believing in the wisdom of uncertainty
Allegiance to a higher level of intelligence that organizes reality
What hurts Dhyana:

Tension
Anticipation
Controlling yourself and others
Rigidity
Insistence on rules and routines
Obsession
Compulsive behavior
Inability to believe that the universe supports you
In these three elements, as you can see, lies a lifetime of potential unfolding into actuality. Every thought has the power of intention behind it. The only issue is how far you are willing to go to cooperate with this ability, to unearth its possibilities, and improve your skill at Samyama.

I’ve deviated from the Indian spiritual tradition by making the power of intention a natural aspect of the mind rather than an advanced, specialized ability that only yogis and swamis can attain. But this is in keeping with the spiritual principle I hold highest: All spiritual attainments are a birthright belonging to everyone. The greatest mysteries are answered by looking at ourselves, here and now.

Source: Chopra

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The Ultimate Prayer – Rupert Spira

A Spiritual Mystery: Does God Listen to Prayers? – Deepak Chopra Part II

To say that prayers are answered isn’t the same as saying that God answers prayers…

In the first case, a thought manifests as reality. You wish, intend, or ask for an outcome, and the outcome appears. In the second case, a supernatural being in the sky listens to millions of requests every day and kindly responds to a few while turning his back on the vast majority. The first post in this series was devoted to a consciousness-based explanation for prayers as opposed to a religious explanation.

The question automatically arises: If answered and unanswered prayers have a basis in our own awareness, what creates the difference? Here, I think, the religious explanation leads to serious difficulties. If you pray to be healed, for example, and the healing doesn’t come, religious thinking puts the blame on you. God has not granted your prayer, the reasoning goes, because you don’t have enough faith. Or you didn’t surrender to his will. Or you have secret sins in your heart that you haven’t repented of. These are time-honored explanations, and the problem with them—as with the existence of God—is that they can’t be proved one way or another. Does God hate you? Is God simply unfair? These are questions that have no basis for a valid answer.

The Mysterious Realm of Cause and Effect
On the other hand, consciousness is undoubtedly real. How to explain its origins remains a mystery, but we all think, and one mode of thinking is to intend for something to happen. If this something is within physical reach, you can reach for it. Grabbing a pizza, starting the car, getting out of bed in the morning—our choice to connect cause-and-effect in these cases is considered normal and natural. Other intentions seem supernatural because the link between cause and effect is invisible.

Yet the reach of the supernatural is actually quite arbitrary from culture to culture. An airplane might easily seem supernatural to an aboriginal culture, or the action of aspirin to eliminate pain, or the ability of a bullet to kill a deer. Before labeling this as a primitive reaction, consider that in modern society we have no explanation for where thoughts come from or how the invisible quantum field gives rise to the appearance of solid, tangible objects. We simply accept that some line of cause-and-effect exists, which will be clarified by future scientists. This article of faith breaks down when you ask the obvious question: Where do cause and effect come from? Ever since the quantum revolution of a century ago, Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity and Heisenberg’s Uncertainty Principle disabused physics of naive realism, the notion that reality matches what our five senses tell us.

We live in a universe that is radically different from what our eyes and ears perceive, and one major difference is known as “non-locality.” Even though a rose bush growing in your yard looks isolated, alone, an intact, it is actually an outcropping of the quantum field at the microscopic field, and its position in time and space isn’t local at all. The quanta from which matter arises are at bottom only probability waves, extending infinitely in all directions. At an even finer level all matter and energy vanish into the quantum vacuum, which is a field of pure potential which would appear to the naked eye as a void. So the rose bush is nowhere and everywhere at the same time.

Physics remains baffled about how the non-locality of quantum events turns into the obvious locality of a rose bush, which sits in your yard, not on Mars or the Andromeda galaxy. For a long time the scientific mind resisted the possibility that quantum behavior might apply in everyday life. Reality was divided into two compartments, one for quanta, which are allowed to act as strangely as they like, and one for rose bushes and other “classical” objects, which act in the normal cause-and-effect way. But the notion of two realities is uncomfortable, and in recent decades a genuine effort has been made to find the link between quantum and classical, so that we can have a single reality whose laws and rules are united at some deeper level.

What Happens to Prayers
This brings us back to prayers. Let’s say that a prayer is a classical event, or feels like one. You, a unique individual, have a particular request, which you voice in words that no one else is speaking at that instant. What if this classical event gets processed at a non-local level? The notion isn’t far-fetched, because it seems that the mind-body link does consist of fluctuations at the quantum level. If this is so, then any thought, not just a prayer, has quantum implications, and if that’s true, suddenly we have taken a trip into the realm of the non-local.

Your prayer will be answered, or not, depending on events happening out of sight—but not out of mind. By expanding our definition of mind, we can account for answered prayers, and even set down their behavior. Once a prayer is allowed to leave the classical world, it doesn’t become supernatural. It enters another level of Nature, and what happens there is fascinating.

View Here

Source: Chopra

A Spiritual Mystery: Does God Listen to Prayers? By Deepak Chopra, M.D.

Without taking a poll, it’s safe to say that people who believe in God also believe that he answers prayers. If he didn’t, one would be left with an indifferent, distant deity who pays no attention to human affairs. This alternative is hard to reconcile with faith, and so believers are left with a God who seems to answer prayers selectively. It’s as if there’s an invisible telephone line to Heaven, and when you call, sometimes God picks up and sometimes he doesn’t.

I’ve simplified the scheme—the theology of prayer gets very complicated—because for most believers, praying is simple. You entreat God to do something special for you, and you take your chances. For every answered prayer, millions go unanswered. God must be a selective listener, or else there’s something wrong with the person who is praying.

Despite this frustrating and irrational setup, who hasn’t turned to prayer in times of greatest need?

To get to the heart of this question, we should start with a blank slate. Set aside your image of God as a father sitting on his throne somewhere above the clouds. Such images differ from one religion to the next and are clearly projections of the human mind validated only by cultural myths and traditions. Second, lose the notion of the invisible telephone line. If God is omnipresent, there is no distance between you and the one you pray to. Finally, strip God of all human attributes, including gender. Whatever God is, the reality must be superhuman, however you define the term.

Mundane Intentions Versus Deep Desires

In the Indian spiritual tradition, these first steps were taken thousands of years go. The slate was completely clean, and therefore one could ask the most basic question: Why does any desire come true? For a prayer is essentially a desire or intention. It differs from mundane intentions like wanting a candy bar or intending to do a good job in one thing only: the desired object seems out of reach. We invoke a superhuman power when human powers fail.

This is where the Indian sages had a brilliant thought. What if mundane intentions are not different from prayers? This possibility defies the logic of prayers if you think you are telephoning God. What links all intentions, no matter how extraordinary, is that they happen in consciousness. So the mystery of prayer turns into a more fundamental investigation into how consciousness actually works. Clearly the intention to eat a candy bar or to do a good job at work brings the mind into contact with reality in such a way that intention is connected to outcome. So why isn’t this true when you pray for a friend to recover from cancer or for peace in the Middle East?

Samyama

The answer, according to the Vedic rishis, who explored consciousness more deeply than anyone else, comes down to three aspects that enter into any intention, indeed into any thought.

1.How deep into the mind is the intention coming from?
2.How steady is your focus?
3.How fluid is your intention?

In Sanskrit these three elements are known as Samadhi, Dharana, and Dhyana, and when all three are fused, the entire mechanism is called Samyama. There’s no need to dwell on these terms, only to point out that the success or failure of an intention depends on the effective use of one’s awareness, not on a request to a deity who may or may not be listening. Samyama basically means to bind or hold together, and when all three of these components are unified, that’s what makes for the strongest intentions. You have gone deep enough into your own self-awareness that you can affect what happens in the outer world; your intention is one-pointed rather than scattered; and your mind is steady while remaining fluid and flexible.

The Obstacles in Prayer

If this explanation is correct, it describes unanswered prayers as the product of a mind that is restless, shallow, conflicted, or unable to focus. All of us suffer from these obstacles.

Answered prayers, on the other hand, represent a kind of total clarity that may come at any moment, like the sudden parting of the clouds, and at such a moment the mechanism that fulfills intentions works smoothly. Although Samyama is identified in the tradition of Yoga as a high attainment, it seems reasonable to say that the same mechanism exists in everyday consciousness. After all, to live is to carry out intentions.

Once you understand how the mechanism works, you have a choice. You can meditate or pursue other spiritual techniques that bring the three elements of intentionality together. The results will not be the same on every path. Some people will experience a prayer coming true, others will be able to live in the present moment, and others still may feel that they are connected to God.

As straightforward as this description of intentions is, it gives rise to its own questions, which we’ll explore in the next post. To be continued …

God Is the Very Self of Each of Us ~ Rupert Spira

Published on Jan 12, 2018

A woman wants to know what happens to her faith in God and prayer now that she has recognised her essential infinite being.

The Nature of Prayer ~ Rupert Spira


Published on Oct 27, 2017

Rupert discusses two types of prayer and how they relate to the understanding ‘I Am That’.
From the seven day retreat at Mercy Center

Gangaji’s Prayer


Published on Dec 23, 2016

“I pray for the awakening of all being.” Gangaji

The Universe Responds to Prayer and Intention


Published on Aug 19, 2016

A conversation about prayer and intention.

Adyashanti – The Heart of Prayer


Published on Jun 21, 2016

http://adyashanti.org – Adyashanti and the Executive Director of Open Gate Sangha, Jerilyn Munyon, discuss the subtle nuances of prayer and how it can change over time. Together they examine how prayer has the potential to evolve—from asking for something into a deep state of listening. Adyashanti and Jerilyn discuss how prayer is a doorway into discovering a quiet intimacy within one’s own experience, and how one can move towards undefended love. Jerilyn offers up a question for contemplation: How can I listen better and more deeply?

Tune in to Radio Adyashanti tomorrow, Wednesday, June 22 at 6pm PST to catch the second broadcast between Adyashanti and Jerilyn Munyon: “The Heart Sutra: An Intimate Conversation”.

http://www.adyashanti.org/cafedharma/…

Tune in to Radio Adyashanti on Thursday, June 23 at 12 Noon PST to catch a replay of the same broadcast, “The Heart Sutra: An Intimate Conversation”.Excerpted From “Faith, Doubt, and Prayer”:http://tinyurl.com/gt3lee2Quotes from this video:“The heart of what prayer does is it connects us, to something bigger, to something in a sense that’s beyond.”“The true nature of us is—it is us and it is also simultaneously beyond us.”

The Franciscan Heart of Thomas Merton: A New Look at the Spiritual Inspiration of His Life, Thought, and Writing by Daniel P. Horan, O.F.M. [updated Sept 24, 2015]

Pub Date Sept 29 2014

Millions of Christians and non-Christians look to Thomas Merton for spiritual wisdom and guidance, but to whom did Merton look? In The Franciscan Heart of Thomas Merton, Franciscan friar and author Daniel Horan shows how, both before and after he became a Trappist monk, Merton’s life was shaped by his love for St. Francis and for the Franciscan spiritual and intellectual tradition. Given recent renewed interest in St. Francis, this timely resource is both informative and practical, revealing a previously hidden side of Merton that will inspire a new generation of Christians to live richer, deeper, and more justice-minded lives of faith.

Daniel P. Horan, O.F.M. is a Franciscan friar of Holy Name Province (New York) and is currently a Ph.D. student in systematic theology at Boston College. Fr. Dan studied at St. Bonaventure University where he earned a B.A. (Honors) degree in theology and journalism. He entered the Order of Friars Minor in 2005, made his first profession of vows in 2007 and was ordained a priest in 2012. During his studies as a friar, he earned an M.A. degree in systematic theology in 2010 and a Master of Divinity (M.Div.) degree in 2012, both from the Washington Theological Union. Fr. Dan has previously taught in the department of religious studies at Siena College (2010-2011) and has been a visiting professor in the department of theology at St. Bonaventure University during summer session (2012). He currently serves on the Board of Directors of the International Thomas Merton Society.

The author of many scholarly and popular articles, Fr. Dan received a 2011 Catholic Press Association first-place award for his writing on spirituality. He is the author of several books, including Dating God: Live and Love in the Way of St. Francis (2012) and Francis of Assisi and the Future of Faith: Exploring Franciscan Spirituality and Theology in the Modern World (2012). In addition to his column in America, Fr. Dan is a regular contributor to Give Us This Day (Liturgical Press) and The Huffington Post. To learn more about his writing and speaking engagements, visit his website: DanHoran.com. He blogs at DatingGod.org and you can also find him on Facebook and Twitter (@DanHoranOFM)

Dating God: Intimacy, Prayer, and Franciscan Spirituality

Published on Mar 5, 2014

Fr. Dan brings the Franciscan tradition to life by imagining our faith journeys in terms of “dating” as a dynamic, creative, and renewing spiritual thread for twenty-first century
Christians.

Thomas Merton, Spiritual Master

Published on Feb 23, 2015

Thomas Merton was not perfect, and he might not have been a saint. But he was indeed a master of the spiritual life, and his life and work had a profound effect on me and an army of others around the world. Fr. Barron offers a tribute to him on the 100th anniversary of Merton’s birth. Find more videos at http://WordOnFire.org.

Devotional Practices – Part 2

Published on Aug 27, 2015
Devotional Practices – Part 2 (07/01/2015)

The sacred feminine expresses the realization of our belonging, our innate interdependence with all of life. These two classes explores inner practices that help us open to our longing to belong, and awaken the power of prayer.
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The Principles of New Thought: Tracing Spiritual Truth from the Source to the Soul by April Moncrieff

The roots of New Thought can be traced back to the early 1800s, and like any spiritual movement, the interpretation and application of basic principles tend to evolve with society in a changing world.
From our vantage point in the 21st century, we can see that despite the diverse path New Thought has taken, its core beliefs continue to be a source of comfort for individuals seeking spiritual strength and encouragement.

What are these basic principles and why do they provide a long-lasting spiritual foundation? In THE PRINCIPLES OF NEW THOUGHT, author April Moncrieff has answered this question and clarified the unique aspects of New Thought by explaining the Biblical and individual influences that sparked this spiritual way of life. Not stopping there, this intriguing book will make one realize that the philosophy actually dovetails more closely with Biblical teachings than many of today s traditional Christian groups.

Ernest Holmes was quoted as saying, The Principles governing the New Thought movement are universal but individually and independently applied. In other words, even though the one True Source behind New Thought has forever been available, the spiritual laws are useless without the acknowledgement and action of each and every soul. Here s a new book that takes New Thought followers to the original roots of this world-wide movement, so they can understand and build a stronger spiritual life of their own.


APRIL MONCRIEFF is an author, teacher, counselor and lifelong student of metaphysical spirituality. An ordained New Thought minister, she has a diploma in Advanced Studies from Unity School of Christianity’s Continuing Education Program and holds Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Religious Studies from Emerson Theological Institute.
She has taught classes,conducted meditation groups, lectured for many years on a variety of metaphysical subjects, published poetry in Unity magazine, and writes children’s fiction with spiritual themes.
Rev. Moncrieff is a graduate of Connecticut College with a B.A. in English. She enjoys reading, music, word games, travel, antiques, vegetarian cooking and yoga.

Browse Here

Change Me Prayers: The Hidden Power of Spiritual Surrender by Tosha Silver (Author), Lissa Rankin M.D. (Foreword)

From the author of the life-changing book Outrageous Openness: Letting the Divine Take the Lead, a thoughtful collection of prayers and stories to help you actively invite the Divine into your life.

“Change me Divine Beloved into One who can give and receive freely and be a clear vessel for Your Light.”

In this sequel to her first book, Tosha Silver, with her characteristic mix of passion and humor, shows how to embrace transformation from the inside out. Covering a variety of topics—from work and finances to love and self-worth—Change Me Prayers shows how to truly surrender to a Divine plan in the most joyous and uplifting way.

At its heart, this book is a spiritual guide to help anyone open to this union with Love, even in times of difficulty or crisis, and includes a convenient “Change Me Prayers Quick Guide.” Tosha proves to be a profound, unique, and often hilarious guide to awakening. May the Divine permeate every part of your life!

Tosha Silver
graduated from Yale with a degree in English literature but along the way fell madly in love with yogic philosophy. For the last thirty years she has taught people around the world ways to align with this inner Love. She is the author of Outrageous Openness and lives near San Francisco, where she runs an online school dedicated to these ideas, called “Think Like a Goddess.” Please visit ToshaSilver.com for more information.

Tosha Silver on ‘Change Me Prayers’

Published on May 4, 2015

Tosha Silver, author of the life-changing book ‘Outrageous Openness’, talks about her new book ‘Change Me Prayers’, a thoughtful collection of prayers and stories to deeply invite the divine into your life.

Letting the Divine take the lead – Tosha Silver

A compilation of funny, irreverently reverent stories on aligning with the Divine in daily life. It’s written for the passionately spiritual and bemusedly skeptical alike.
I know without doubt that a Force of Love exists that can guide, help and interact with each of us in the most intimate and practical way no matter what the conditions.
If only we know how to invite It in.
This book will tell you how.
My overriding passion for inviting and dancing with this Force eventually gave birth to “Outrageous Openness”.

The Idea of God

Published on Apr 21, 2015

A discussion about the essence of prayer.

Prayer for the Earth – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee


Published on Mar 27, 2015
Recorded December 3, 2011 at the Mercy Center, Burlingame, California

Prayer is a response to a need. Our need. The Beloved’s need. And at this time, most pressingly, the need of the Earth.

From the book Prayer of the Heart: goldensufi.org/book_desc_prayer_heart.ht­ml
Category
Nonprofits & Activism

Atma Vichara And Contemplative Prayer In The Christian Mystical Tradition ~ Francis Bennett

Published on Feb 15, 2015
I want to explore the parallels and individual contributions of the practice of Atma Vichara or Self-Investigation as taught by Sri Ramana Maharshi and the practice of contemplative prayer as taught in the 14th century Christian mystical treatise known as, “The Cloud of Unknowing”. Both practices are essentially quite similar in that they are both encouraging the practitioner to rest and abide in a felt sense of presence here and now. The touching into this sense of presence is the “practice”. The dawning experiential seeing or direct understanding of the fact that this presence has always been present is the “realization” that is possible. This could be called either “God-realization” or “Self-realization”, but I feel both terms are pointing to essentially the same realization of the absolute.

Even though essentially quite similar, the two practices can often have a somewhat different “tone” to them. The Atma Vichara practice is imbued with a sharp and precise spirit of deep investigation while the contemplative prayer approach has a decidedly devotional or bhakti aspect, which I feel adds a dimension of power to the basic idea of looking at pure consciousness itself, which is really the essence of both practices. Contemplative prayer, rather than simply understood as object-less or non-conceptual awareness, aware of itself, is awareness LOVINGINGLY aware of itself. The author of “The Cloud” calls this a resting in the “blind (non-conceptual) stirring of love”. I think a kind of blending of these two practices could possibly provide a creative synergy that has the potential to accelerate the
possible effects of the practices by taking the discriminating spirit of profound investigation as found in the Traditional practice of Atma Vichara and combining it with the predominant devotional aspect found in the traditional practice of contemplative prayer.

Francis Bennett was a Roman Catholic, Trappist monk for a number of years. He lived in two monasteries of the Trappist Order in the US and was also a member of an urban, contemplative monastic community originally founded in Paris, France in 1975. He has lived in France at several monasteries, and in Canada at a small monastic community in Montreal Quebec. He received a five and a half year monastic/spiritual formation with the Trappists before he made his vows as a monk at Gethsemani Abbey in 1983. He graduated from the Pontifical College Josephinum with a BA in Philosophy and completed a two year residency in Clinical Pastoral Education with Ohio Health Hospital System in Columbus, Ohio.

He has worked in ministry in the area of spiritual Care in the hospice movement, as a hospital chaplain and in spiritual care of the sick and dying in parish settings. He has lead retreats in both the Vipassana Buddhist Tradition and in the Christian mystical/contemplative Tradition. In 2010, while in the middle of a Church Service in his monastery in Montreal, Francis suddenly experienced what he has come to call, “a radical perceptual shift in consciousness”, in which he discovered the ever present presence of spacious, pure awareness.

He came to see that this awareness is actually the unchanging essence of who he really is and always has been; the Supreme Self, talked about by many sages and saints from many spiritual traditions down through the ages. He also came to see simultaneously, that this vast, infinite sense of presence at the center of his being (and at the center of the being of everyone else on the planet) is actually not at all separate from the presence of God, which he had been looking for during his many years as a monk and spiritual seeker.

VIEW HERE FRANCIS’S BOOK ” I AM THAT I AM” and THE INTERVIEW

Slowing Time Seeing the Sacred Outside Your Kitchen Door by Barbara Mahany

Pub Date Oct 7 2014

Invites readers to discern the divine in the ordinary moments of everyday and live an examined life where everything is a form of prayer.

Barbara Mahany believes the sacred is all around, within finger’s reach—here to be gathered, culled, collected, through the simple yet complex art of paying attention, of savoring the moment, of cultivating stillness. Making room for the God and illuminating the Godly specks in the everyday. Noticing the seen, revealing the unseen, and pinpointing the divine in both.
The book sifts through the terrain of three particular landscapes where the author most often encounters the stirrings of the Divine: under heaven’s dome; on the front lines of the homefront; and in the unspooling of the seasons. The most essential prayer, often, is the life closely examined, held up to the light.
By probing deeply the nooks and crannies of the home-front, the author points out that the reader need not venture far to find what matters most. And the questions stirred will linger, long after the page is turned.

From the front pages of the Chicago Tribune, to her revered page-two columns, Barbara Mahany has opened her heart and told her stories and the stories of her family’s life that have drawn in thousands of readers for decades. She writes from the well of her Christian-Jewish marriage. Bracingly honest and heart-achingly daring, she explores the sacred mysteries with a voice, recognizable and clear. She is a sought-after speaker, and writing teacher. She lives in Wilmette, Illinois.

How Do You Pray? Inspiring Responses from Religious Leaders, Spiritual Guides, Healers, Activists and Other Lovers of Humanity By Celeste Yacoboni

As we evolve, so do our prayers; as our prayers evolve, so do we. This is the evolution of illumination, the collective voice of the soul of the world.
How Do You Pray? was born from a vision in which Celeste Yacoboni was told to ask the world, “How Do You Pray?” She reached out to leading spiritual, shamanic, scientific teachers, guides, and activists and asked for their response.

Culled from those responses is an original and deeply personal collection of essays. Talking intimately and candidly about how they pray, these personalities encourage the reader to contemplate the intention of prayer in their own life.

This collection speaks to the reader’s heart and asks What is your soul’s expression? How do you dance in ecstasy, bare your soul to the divine? Bow in gratitude? Merge with nature? Cry out for guidance? How do you pray?

This groundbreaking and moving book gathers responses from leaders of diverse spiritual and religious traditions ranging from Buddhism to Islam to Christianity, as well as those who do not claim one or any particular walk of faith.
Contributors include Brother David Steindl-Rast, Matthew Fox, James O’Dea, Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, Tessa Bielecki, Lama Surya Das, Hank Wesselman, Father Bede Griffiths, Byron Katie, Joan Halifax, Normandi Ellis, Andrew Harvey, Dan Millman, Kristena Prater, Nicki Scully, Mirabai Starr, and more.
This book in hard cover with matte laminate cover and book mark ribbon is a beautiful gift package.

Celeste Yacoboni is a Minister of Walking Prayer, ordained by the Center for Sacred Studies in Sonora, California. Her work focuses on guiding and supporting people through transitions by creating a space of awareness, presence and inspiration which integrates body, mind, spirit and emotions. She maintains a thriving private practice in Santa Fe, NM in which she facilitates healing and wholeness through Massage Therapy, Chi Nei Tsang, Qigong, Women’s Breast Health, Plant Essences, the Hawaiian practice of Ho’oponopono, and the inquiry “How Do You Pray?” Celeste leads “How Do You Pray?” workshops in which people share and experience different ways of prayer and connecting to Source. On her Ho’oponopono CD, Celeste sings a Hawaiian healing practice which creates a space of love, compassion, forgiveness and gratitude. Celeste lives in New Mexico.

BROWSE HERE

Ho’oponopono Circle: Loving the Water

By chanting Ho’oponopono, “I’m sorry, I love you, please forgive me, thank you,” we send love and healing to the water and all of life.

Our bodies are mostly water, our planet is mostly water and water is intelligence that responds to our love, prayers and intentions.

Think it, say it, sing it, pray it…

Celeste Yacoboni created the chant based on the ancient Hawaiian practice of reconciliation and forgiveness called, Ho’oponopono.

Darkening of the Light: Witnessing the End of an Era by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

A compelling insight into the impact that external, ecological damage has on the inner self, this spiritual exploration argues that although spiritual teachings reveal that events in the outer world are a reflection of changes taking place in the inner world, there is little awareness and discussion of how this outer darkening is reflected within.

The book tells the story of changes that have been taking place in the inner worlds that belong to a collective spiritual destiny and the fate of the planet, changes that are as significant as the ecological devastation even as they are unreported and unacknowledged. It asserts that destruction of the surrounding world, as it continues, is reflected in the inner worlds of all people through a loss of sacred light, and the threat of a soulless wasteland looms large. The book seeks to address readers’ futures as individuals and as a whole, and to inspire people to take responsibility for the earth and reclaim humanity’s sacred role as its guardians.

Click here to browse inside.

Darkening of the Light Book Trailer with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

“Darkening of the Light: Witnessing the End of an Era,” a new book by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee, is a witness to the loss of the light of the sacred reflected in our continued destruction and desecration of life’s fragile ecosystem. This story of our collective destiny, however painful, needs to be heard if we are to take responsibility for the Earth and reclaim our sacred role as guardians of the planet.

Listen HERE Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee Interview with Werner Brandt of the Work that Reconnect in which they discuss the importance of witnessing the ecological crisis of our time, so we might feel and honor our pain for Anima Mundi, the soul of the world, and how we might respond with love and courage.

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