Leanne Whitney – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Leanne Whitney Ph.D. is an independent scholar in the fields of depth psychology and consciousness studies. She specializes in the intersection of Western psychology and the Eastern liberatory traditions.

For over twenty-five years Leanne has researched the mind body connection and, over the last fifteen plus years, their interrelation with pure consciousness. Trained in depth psychology, yoga, and craniosacral therapy, in her private practice, Leanne works with clients one-on-one to resolve mental, emotional, and physical blocks which obscure the ever-present alignment of the authentic Self. Working with clients online as well as in person, her practice is international, spanning four continents. Her clientele is diverse; racially, socio-economically, and in sexual orientation.

Leanne is the author of Consciousness in Jung and Patañjali (Routledge, 2018) as well as several academic papers. Her published papers include Innate and Emergent: Jung, Yoga and the Archetype of the Self Meet the Objective Measures of Affective Neuroscience, and Jung in Dialogue with Freud and Patañjali: Instinct, Affective Neuroscience, and the Reconciliation of Science and Religious Experience, both for the open access journal Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy.

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Consciousness in Jung and Patañjali (Research in Analytical Psychology and Jungian Studies) by Leanne Whitney

The East-West dialogue increasingly seeks to compare and clarify contrasting views on the nature of consciousness. For the Eastern liberatory models, where a nondual view of consciousness is primary, the challenge lies in articulating how consciousness and the manifold contents of consciousness are singular. Western empirical science, on the other hand, must provide a convincing account of how consciousness arises from matter. By placing the theories of Jung and Patañjali in dialogue with one another, Consciousness in Jung and Patañjali illuminates significant differences between dual and nondual psychological theory and teases apart the essential discernments that theoreticians must make between epistemic states and ontic beliefs.

Patañjali’s Classical Yoga, one of the six orthodox Hindu philosophies, is a classic of Eastern and world thought. Patañjali teaches that notions of a separate egoic “I” are little more than forms of mistaken identity that we experience in our attempts to take ownership of consciousness. Carl Jung’s depth psychology, which remains deeply influential to psychologists, religious scholars, and artists alike, argues that ego-consciousness developed out of the unconscious over the course of evolution. By exploring the work of key theoreticians from both schools of thought, particularly those whose ideas are derived from an integration of theory and practice, Whitney explores the extent to which the seemingly irremediable split between Jung and Patañjali’s ontological beliefs can in fact be reconciled.

This thorough and insightful work will be essential reading for academics, theoreticians, and postgraduate students in the fields of psychology, philosophy of science, and consciousness studies. It will also appeal to those interested in the East–West psychological and philosophical dialogue.

Dr. Leanne Whitney is an independent scholar in the fields of depth psychology and consciousness studies. She specializes in the intersection of Western psychology and the Eastern liberatory traditions. In addition to Consciousness in Jung and Patañjali she has published several academic papers. Dr. Whitney works as a transformational coach both online and in person, with her private practice located in Los Angeles, California. She earned her MA in statistics from the University of St. Andrews and her PhD in depth psychology from Pacifica Graduate Institute. For more information, visit leannewhitney.com.


Consciousness in Jung and Patanjali with Leanne Whitney

Leanne Whitney, PhD, is author of Consciousness in Jung and Patanjali. She is a transformational coach and also teaches yoga philosophy to yoga teachers.

Here she compares the western, depth psychology of Carl G. Jung with the yoga tradition of India, as outlined in the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali. She notes that Jung never accepted the eastern ideal that spiritual enlightenment could free one from mental suffering. Nor did Jungian theory address the concept of pure consciousness that is central to yoga philosophy. While Jung was fascinated with eastern wisdom, he ultimately felt that the western alchemical tradition offered greater insights into the human psyche.

New Thinking Allowed host, Jeffrey Mishlove, PhD, hosted and co-produced the original Thinking Allowed public television series. He is author of The Roots of Consciousness. He is also a past vice-president of the Association for Humanistic Psychology; and is the recipient of the Pathfinder Award from that Association for his contributions to the field of human consciousness exploration.

The Five Hurdles to Happiness: And the Mindful Path to Overcoming Them by Mitch Abblett (Author)

A practical approach to becoming aware of the “five hindrances”–the negative qualities that inhibit living the awakened life–and to breaking free of them in order to live more mindfully, effectively, compassionately.

Five obstacles stand in between you and true happiness. What are they and how can you overcome them? Buddhist traditions teach that there are five negative qualities, or hindrances, that inhibit people from living an awakened life.

Here, Mitch Abblett gives this teaching a modern, secular interpretation and helps you identify the hurdles that are blocking your contentment—desire, hostility, sluggishness, worry, and doubt—and how you can take your first steps to overcoming them. Combining traditional wisdom with contemporary psychology and using examples from his psychotherapy practice, Abblett uses the hurdles as a frame for engaging you in a process of contemplating your own life and learning to lean into your experience rather than merely repeating bad habits. By doing this, you can break free from the hurdles and live more mindfully, effectively, and compassionately.


Dr. Mitch Abblett is a clinical psychologist, author, consultant and speaker. As a clinician, his services focus on work with children, teens, parents, families and adults with whom he creates solutions for a range of concerns or desired growth areas. A clinician in the Boston area for over 15 years, he brings a wealth of clinical experience from various settings (hospitals, outpatient clinics, residential facilities and therapeutic schools) to his practice. For 11 years he served as the Clinical Director of the Manville School at Judge Baker Children’s Center in Boston – a Harvard-affiliated therapeutic school program for children and adolescents with emotional, behavioral and learning difficulties. He has also served as the Executive Director of the Institute for Meditation and Psychotherapy.

As a consultant and speaker, Dr. Abblett empowers changes clients through collaborative, tailored interventions. His consultative and training work focuses on mindfulness, compassion and value-driven action and empowering clients to communicate skillfully and authentically. He improves clients’ school and work effectiveness, reduces the effects of stress, and increases skills for health self-management and daily productivity. Dr. Abblett’s writing includes a mindfulness-based book for clinicians (The Heat of the Moment: Mindful Management of Difficult Clients; WW Norton & Co.), Mindfulness for Teen Depression and Helping Your Angry Teen (both with New Harbinger), five decks of mindfulness practice cards such as Growing Mindful: A Deck of Mindfulness Practices for All Ages: PESI Publishing). His upcoming book, The Five Hurdles to Happiness-and the Mindful Path to Overcoming Them will be released by Shambhala Publications in August 2018. He also blogs regarding mindfulness applications in family and relationships on Mindful.org.

Science and Spirituality: Observations from Modern Consciousness Research By Stanislav Grof, M.D., Ph.D.

The leading philosophy of Western science has been monistic materialism. Various scientific disciplines have described the history of the universe as the history of developing matter and accept as real only what can be measured and weighed. Life, consciousness, and intelligence are seen as more or less accidental side-products of material processes. Physicists, biologists, and chemists recognize the existence of dimensions of reality that are not accessible to our senses, but only those that are physical in nature and can be revealed and explored with the use of various extensions of our senses, such as microscopes or telescopes, specially designed recording devices, and laboratory experiments.

In a universe understood this way, there is no place for spirituality of any kind. The existence of God, the idea that there are invisible dimensions of reality inhabited by nonmaterial beings, the possibility of survival of consciousness after death, and the concept of reincarnation and karma have been relegated to fairy tales and handbooks of psychiatry. From a psychiatric perspective, to take such things seriously means to be ignorant, unfamiliar with the discoveries of science, superstitious, and subject to primitive magical thinking. If the belief in God or Goddess occurs in intelligent persons, it is seen as an indication that they have not come to terms with the infantile images of their parents as omnipotent beings that they had created in their infancy and childhood. And direct experiences of spiritual realities are considered manifestations of serious mental diseases — psychoses.

The study of holotropic states has thrown new light on the problem of spirituality and religion. The key to this new understanding is the discovery that in these states it is possible to encounter a rich array of experiences which are very similar to those that inspired the great religions of the world — visions of God and various divine and demonic beings, encounters with discarnate entities, episodes of psychospiritual death and rebirth, visits to Heaven and Hell, past life experiences, and many others. Modern research has shown beyond any doubt that these experiences are not products of pathological processes afflicting the brain, but manifestations of archetypal material from the collective unconscious, and thus normal and essential constituents of the human psyche. Although these mythic elements are accessed intrapsychically in a process of experiential self-exploration and introspection, they are ontologically real and have objective existence. The matrices for them exist in deep recesses of the unconscious psyche of every human being.

In view of these observations, the fierce battle that religion and science had fought over the last few centuries appears ludicrous and completely unnecessary. Genuine science and authentic religion do not compete for the same territory; they represent two approaches to existence, which are complementary, not competitive. Science studies phenomena in the material world, the realm of the measurable and weighable, while spirituality and true religion draw their inspiration from experiential knowledge of the aspect of the world that Jungians refer to as “imaginal,” to distinguish it from imaginary products of individual fantasy or psychopathology. This imaginal world manifests in what I call “holotropic states of consciousness” — the altered states in which experiences surface that, as stated above, are very similar to those that inspired the great religions of the world.

Spirituality is a very important and natural dimension of the human psyche, and the spiritual quest is a legitimate and fully justified human endeavor. However, it is necessary to emphasize that this applies to genuine spirituality based on personal experience and does not provide support for ideologies and dogmas of organized religions. To prevent misunderstanding and confusion that in the past compromised many similar discussions, it is critical to make a clear distinction between spirituality and religion.

Spirituality is based on direct experiences of ordinarily invisible numinous dimensions of reality, which become available in holotropic states of consciousness. It does not require a special place or officially appointed persons mediating contact with the divine. The mystics do not need churches or temples. The context in which they experience the sacred dimensions of reality, including their own divinity, is provided by their bodies and nature. And instead of officiating priests, they need a supportive group of fellow seekers or the guidance of a teacher who is more advanced on the inner journey than they are themselves.

Organized religions tend to create hierarchical systems focusing on the pursuit of power, control, politics, money, possessions, and other worldly concerns. Under these circumstances, religious hierarchy as a rule dislikes and discourages direct spiritual experiences in its members, because they foster independence and cannot be effectively controlled. When this is the case, genuine spiritual life continues only in the mystical branches, monastic orders, and ecstatic sects of the religions involved. A deep mystical experience tends to dissolve the boundaries between religions and reveals deep connections between them, while dogmatism of organized religions tends to emphasize differences between various creeds and engenders antagonism and hostility.

There is no doubt that the dogmas of organized religions are generally in fundamental conflict with science, whether this science uses the mechanistic-materialistic model or is anchored in the emerging paradigm. However, the situation is very different in regard to authentic mysticism based on spiritual experiences. The great mystical traditions have amassed extensive knowledge about human consciousness and about the spiritual realms in a way that is similar to the method that scientists use in acquiring knowledge about the material world. It involves a methodology for inducing transpersonal experiences, systematic collection of data, and intersubjective validation. Spiritual experiences, like any other aspect of reality, can be subjected to careful open-minded research and studied scientifically.

Scientifically conducted consciousness research has brought convincing evidence for the objective existence of the imaginal realm and has thus validated the main metaphysical assumptions of the mystical world view, of the Eastern spiritual philosophies, and even certain beliefs of native cultures.

The conflict between religion and science reflects a fundamental misunderstanding of both. As Ken Wilber has pointed out, there cannot be a conflict between science and religion if both these fields are properly understood and practiced. If there seems to be a conflict, we are likely dealing with “bogus science” and “bogus religion.” The apparent incompatibility is due to the fact that either side seriously misunderstands the other’s position and very likely represents also a false version of its own discipline.

An invited contribution to the Ervin Laszlo Forum on Science and Spirituality.

Stanislav Grof, M.D., Ph.D.
Psychiatrist and one of the founders of transpersonal psychology

Dean Radin – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Dean Radin, PhD, is Chief Scientist at the Institute of Noetic Sciences (IONS) and Associated Distinguished Professor of Integral and Transpersonal Psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS). He occasionally gives lectures in the Department of Psychology at Sonoma State University and has served on doctoral dissertation committees at Saybrook University and CIIS. His original career track as a concert violinist shifted into science after earning a BSEE degree in electrical engineering, magna cum laude with honors in physics, from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst, and then an MS in electrical engineering and a PhD in psychology from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. For a decade he worked on advanced telecommunications R&D at AT&T Bell Laboratories and GTE Laboratories. For three decades he has been engaged in frontiers research on the nature of consciousness. Before joining the research staff at IONS in 2001, he held appointments at Princeton University, University of Edinburgh, University of Nevada, Interval Research Corporation, and SRI International.

He is author or coauthor of hundreds of scientific, technical, and popular articles, three dozen book chapters, and three popular books including the award-winning and bestselling The Conscious Universe: The Scientific Truth of Psychic Phenomena (HarperOne, 1997), Entangled Minds: Extrasensory Experiences in a Quantum Reality (Simon & Schuster, 2006), a 2014 Silver Nautilus Book Award, Supernormal: Science, Yoga, and the Evidence for Extraordinary Psychic Abilities (Random House, 2013), and Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern Science, and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe (Penguin Random House). These books have been translated into 14 foreign languages, so far. His technical articles have appeared in journals including Foundations of Physics and Physics Essays to Psychological Bulletin and Journal of Consciousness Studies; he was featured in a New York Times Magazine article; and he has appeared on dozens of television shows ranging from the BBC’s Horizon to PBS’s Closer to Truth. He has given over 400 interviews and talks, including presentations at Harvard, Stanford, Cambridge, Princeton, Virginia Tech, the Sorbonne, the University of British Columbia, and the University of Minnesota, for industries including Google, Johnson & Johnson, Rabobank, and for various government organizations including the US Navy, DARPA, and the National Academy of Sciences.

In 2010, he spent a month lecturing in India as the National Visiting Professor of the Indian Council of Philosophical Research, a program sponsored by India’s Ministry of Human Resource Development. In 2013 and 2014, he gave invited lectures in Kuala Lumpur at the International Center for Leadership and Governance, an organization supported by the Central Bank of Malaysia. In 2015 he spoke at the Australian Leadership Retreat, a confidential program of briefings and discussions for Australian government, business, education, and military leaders.

Website: deanradin.com

Robert Saltzman – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Published on Jul 11, 2017

In the midst of his career as an artist and photographer, Robert Saltzman experienced a sudden and profound awakening—a deep vision into the actual nature of “myself.” That abrupt change in point of view, along with a subsequent long illness and slow recovery, changed the course of his life. He left the art world, obtained a doctorate in Depth Psychology, and began his practice of psychotherapy, a work he describes as “days in a small room, face to face with pain and suffering.”

As an adjunct to his therapy practice, Robert established a website, www-dr-robert.com that featured his replies to questions about psychology, consciousness, and ordinary problems of living such as relationships, personality disorders, sexuality, mental illness, death and dying, etc. That site became the most popular ask the psychologist web page on the internet, and has welcomed over four million visitors.

In 2012, Robert moved his question and answer work to a Facebook page where it continues to this day. The Ten Thousand Things is a book of words and images about awakening, consciousness, philosophy, and spirituality. Forty chapters–each beginning with a photograph–based upon Robert’s replies to questions posed to him on Facebook and in private correspondence.

Book: The Ten Thousand Things

Website: http://dr-robert.com

Video

Can You Know Your True Self? The importance of connecting from within by John T. Chirban Ph.D, Th.D.

How can we know who we are?

Psychologists distinguish the False Self (how we inaccurately present ourself), the Ideal Self (how we want to see ourself), the Real Self (who we actually are), and the True Self (actualization of our potential).

Actualization of our True Self results from understanding and developing the innate qualities that define the qualities of human nature. Awareness of our authentic nature is available to each of us — it resides within us. By understanding and responding to our true self we:

Understand our “being”—attune to our talents and develop our character.
Align our self with our purpose—make direct connection with self, others, and God (however we define the ultimate meaning or measure).
Live authentically—thrive by experiencing our innate design.

While it is important to listen to and consider the ideas and perspectives of others, it’s essential to recognize that others may not understand our insight nor have the capacity to facilitate our growth. We must look inside ourselves to ask who we are and whether we are living a life that is consistent with our True Self. We cannot afford to ignore our True Self or arrive at answers about our self foregoing this internal reflection, for far too much is at stake.

A growing literature in health psychology confirms the importance of developing an internal life and spirituality for happiness and well being.* Our efforts through spirituality seek higher existential connectedness, as our faith experiences affirm this reality. Thus, awareness and applications of practices of faith and spirituality increase capacities toward exisitential fulfillment, happiness, and wellness.

We take ownership of our yearning for fulfillment as we experience the True Self by living through authentic connections with our self, others, and God (the critical connections). By doing so, we feel integrity in our actions. We feel confidence about our stance, when we live our life in truth. Many sacred traditions of the world and great thinkers across disciplines have tried to answer the question of our purpose through inner knowing—the engagement of self with others and God—as the means for this process.

To engage in the process, we must first experience the qualities of our nature that are found in the True Self—to find connection with our authentic self. The True Self is innate. It is the source of two universal truths: first, our intrinsic capacities, as human beings, which make us unique and distinguishes humanity from the rest of creation, and, second, the product of our interdependent relationship of our self, others, and God—our critical connections.

The first, our unique human qualities, are:

Spontaneity (being spontaneous): spontaneity is our ability to express our self without hindrance; it is aliveness.
Reasoning (being rational): reasoning is sound, clear thinking.
Creativity (being creative): creativity is a unique expression of our ability to make something out of our unique, originality of thought.
Free Will ( being independent): free will is our ability to choose; establishing our voice in relation to others and exercising integrity in our position.
Spirituality (being spiritual): spirituality is a mystery not only because it involves something beyond our control and acknowledging our limitations within our limited human condition, but because it emerges from our nature that is not only physical or material that gives us purpose. Spirituality is available to each of us and does not mean ignoring the world but it means being driven beyond the motivations of the “worldly.”
Discernment (being discerning): discernment is our ability to distinguish Good from Evil and to choose the Good; it a moral consciousness.
Love (being loving): Love is our personal care, passion, and sacrifice that characterizes our connections with others.

Are these active elements in your life? Ask yourself, on a scale of 0 to 10 (with “0” being “none” and “10” being “100%”), the extent to which you excerise these seven human qualities in your life.

The second, is our own capacity to embody and to coordinate our critical connections of self, others, and God in life. Take a few moments to reflect on how you interact in your life’s journey. To what extent and degree do you, others, and God figure in your interactions, behaviors, and process? If you were to illustrate the three parts of connections that guide your life as circles on a pages, how large would these circles be drawn as representative of their influence in your behaviors? For example, are you driven primarily by self-interests, the agendas of others, your sense of God’s will for you? How large are these circles and how are these three elements integrated in your actions?

While our ability to express the seven innate qualities of the True Self may be launched by how awareness of the True Self is nurtured in our early development, this matter is far too significant to leave to history, chance, or to others. Our connection to our True Self affects how we perceive ourselves and engage life today. Our perception of the True Self encourages us to access character-building elements and access our potential.

John T. Chirban, Ph.D., Th.D., is a part-time lecturer at Harvard Medical School and author of Collateral Damage: Guiding and Protecting Your Child Through the Minefield of Divorce (HarperCollins, 2017). For more information visit drchirban.com.

References

*Koenig, H. G. (2012). Religious vs. conventional psychotherapy for major depression in patients with chronic medical illness: Rationale, methods, and preliminary results. Depression Research and Treatment 2012, Article ID 460419,1-11.

Park, C. L., et al. (2011). “Religious struggle as a predictor of subsequent mental and physical well-being in advanced heart failure patients.” Journal of Behavioral Medicine 34: 426-36.

Vermandere, M., et al. (2011). “Spirituality in general practice: A qualitative evidence synthesis.” British Journal of General Practice 61, no. 592 (2011): e749-e760.

David Loy – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview


Published on Apr 22, 2017

Also see https://batgap.com/david-loy/

David Robert Loy is a professor, writer, and Zen teacher in the Sanbo Kyodan tradition of Japanese Zen Buddhism.
He is a prolific author, whose essays and books have been translated into many languages. His articles appear regularly in the pages of major journals and Buddhist magazines. He is on the editorial or advisory boards of the journals Cultural Dynamics, Worldviews, Contemporary Buddhism, Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, and World Fellowship of Buddhists Review. He is also on the advisory boards of Buddhist Global Relief, the Clear View Project, Zen Peacemakers, and the Ernest Becker Foundation.”
For more details about his teachings, visit his website or his YouTube channel. He also has an extensive audio/video library on his website.

Mind: A Journey to the Heart of Being Human by Daniel J. Siegel M.D. (Author)


A New York Times Bestseller.

A scientist’s exploration into the mysteries of the human mind.
What is the mind? What is the experience of the self truly made of? How does the mind differ from the brain? Though the mind’s contents―its emotions, thoughts, and memories―are often described, the essence of mind is rarely, if ever, defined.

In this book, noted neuropsychiatrist and New York Times best-selling author Daniel J. Siegel, MD, uses his characteristic sensitivity and interdisciplinary background to offer a definition of the mind that illuminates the how, what, when, where, and even why of who we are, of what the mind is, and what the mind’s self has the potential to become. MIND takes the reader on a deep personal and scientific journey into consciousness, subjective experience, and information processing, uncovering the mind’s self-organizational properties that emerge from both the body and the relationships we have with one another, and with the world around us. While making a wide range of sciences accessible and exciting―from neurobiology to quantum physics, anthropology to psychology―this book offers an experience that addresses some of our most pressing personal and global questions about identity, connection, and the cultivation of well-being in our lives. 55 illustrations

Daniel J. Siegel, M.D., is an internationally acclaimed author, award-winning educator, and child psychiatrist. He is currently a clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine where he also serves as a co-investigator at the Center for Culture, Brain, and Development and co-director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center. He is also the Executive Director of the Mindsight Institute, an educational center devoted to promoting insight, compassion, and empathy in individuals, families, institutions and communities. His books include “Mindsight,” “The Developing Mind,” “The Mindful Brain,” “The Mindful Therapist,” “Parenting From the Inside Out,” and “The Whole-Brain Child.” He is the Founding Editor of the Norton Professional Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology which includes “Healing Trauma,” “The Power of Emotion,” and “Trauma and the Body.” He lives in Los Angeles with his wife and two children. For more information on Dr. Siegel’s work, please visit DrDanSiegel.com.

LOOK INSIDE


Published on Aug 15, 2016

Featuring Dr. Dan Siegel, clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine where he is on the faculty of the Center for Culture, Brain, and Development and is the founding co-director of the Mindful Awareness Research Center. Dr. Siegel is the author of numerous bestselling texts and titles, including Mindsight: The New Science of Personal Transformation, The Whole-Brain Child, and Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain.

Recorded on Thursday, August 11, 2016 as part of the Murdock Mind, Body, Spirit Series at the Doerr-Hosier Center at the Aspen Institute in Aspen, Colorado.

Adyashanti – Welcoming Transformation


Adyashanti explores the inherent unsatisfactoriness of life that is woven into the fabric of human existence, and how the fierceness and gracefulness of life are intertwined. Adyashanti points to how our egoic operating system is in a push-pull relationship with life, and points out that our ego can never be fully satisfied. When the trap of the ego harnesses your attention, by stopping for a moment, you are able to realize that you have a choice as to where you place your attention.

By tapping into a deep well of wisdom and by listening to something deeper than the reactive mind, the possibilities before you are endless. A new perspective opens up before you—to see suffering as a motivator to relieve suffering, rather than to run away from it. Suffering no longer has to carry a heavy weight over you—it can birth a transformation within you and lift you up into a non-suffering state of being.

Adyashanti explores the unlimited options available to you in any given situation and points out that the key is to deeply listen to something beyond the reactive mind. When you do this, a calmness settles into being. This provokes the question: What will your relationship with life be?

Excerpted from “Fierce Grace”:

Synchronicity Means Seeing A Heart-Shaped World

“Where love rules there is no will to power.”– C. G. Jung

You notice a funny thing when you look at the evidence for the extension of consciousness–the mind operating beyond the body: the presence of feeling. Throughout the results of scientific experiments with people and animals looking at telepathy or other similar phenomenon, emotion is a discernible quality.

The Evidence highlights Emotion

Biologist Rupert Sheldrake (who loves designing scientific experiments to challenge the skeptical prejudices of his colleagues) has shown: that some dogs do know when their owners are coming home and demonstrate it on video; that people can feel when being stared at 60% of the time (watch the discussion with Morgan Freeman here); that telephone telepathy, knowing who’s calling, happens more often with people we’re emotionally close to (here); that family members demonstrate above average ability at card-guessing with each other, and that twins are best at it–and ironically those who don’t believe it’s possible score below average [here]!

Throughout each of these, emotion plays a role: dogs are emotionally connected to their owners and excited for their return, we feel creeped out by being stared at, and people that are close emotionally are far more likely to have an experience of consciousness as a shared field.

Feelings in Synchronicity

Both Sheldrake and the pioneering Swiss psychologist C. G. Jung noticed the statistical reality of ‘beginner’s luck’ and that with the loss of emotion came a change of luck: “a certain affective condition seems to be indispensable.” And as with beginner’s luck, feeling (whether it is conscious or unconscious) also seems to be an indispensable condition for synchronicity. Synchronicities are moments where outer events and inner states come together in meaningful parallels that are too explicit to explain away: we were just talking about someone and they call us; we break up with someone and we run into them all over town; we feel it in our heart when someone we love needs us, or is in danger; and visions of a relative who just has passed away are surprisingly common. So often at the center of those experiences is a big wad of authentic bodily–experienced feelings: love, hate, care, yearning, longing, wanting, wanting to protect. Our heartstrings seem to be the pathways that draw these experiences into our lives.

How can we understand the presence of emotion in the mystery of the extension of consciousness? To do so means radically reconsidering the way we understand our world; it might mean having to give up what you think you know. Our culture teaches us to pride ourselves on always having the right answers and leaves us ill-prepared for handling something that challenges us entirely. But previous cultures were able to consciously recognize this quality of the world and they designed whole systems of living around them.

Ancient Chinese Secret

To the culture in ancient China that produced the I Ching and the philosophy of Taoism, the world was a field in which our sincerity and inner state was tied in with the flow of events in the outer world. Taoism means “the way,” “the way of Nature,” and to this culture, synchronicity was an obviously present reality. They knew for themselves that by reflecting and working with our inner emotional truth, we became better able to move with the Nature’s flow.

“The art of life is more like navigation than warfare, for what is important is to understand the winds, the tides, the currents, the seasons, and the principles of growth and decay, so that one’s actions may use them and not fight them.”

– Alan Watts

Today our culture can consciously recognize this force. But it requires breaking through the overly-Masculine bias in us that has us reflexively seeing the world as a collection of objects, rather than as a “communion of subjects” (Thomas Berry). Synchronicity means that sometimes the world is the subject and we are the object. The Chinese saw this inter-subjectivity as living in Nature and the world as a balance of Yin and Yang, Feminine and Masculine and the metaphor of the sacred marriage is an especially appropriate one for our time. Today our dried-out, over-rational and too-linear Masculine consciousness is being winked at by something mysterious, curving and purposive–a force responding to our feeling connections with each other and breathing new meaning into our leaves. This archetypally Feminine energy is a mystery to us because we’re used to seeing the world through a Masculine lens of over-simplifications:

“As a rule the specialist’s is a purely masculine mind, an intellect to which fecundity is an alien and unnatural process; it is therefore an especially ill-adapted tool for giving rebirth to a foreign spirit. But a larger mind bears the stamp of the feminine; it is endowed with a receptive and fruitful womb which can reshape what is strange and give it a familiar form.”

C. G. Jung, Introduction to The Secret of the Golden Flower

Synchronicity calls us to exercise the “fruitful womb” inside ourselves: to hold such experiences in our mind is one thing, to hold them in our heart is something else. In this way, it falls to us to bring this wedding into being in our time, to birth the new energy, to come to embody the archetypal Feminine in the world and know in our hearts that “where love rules there is no will to power.”

When we come together to explore this new view and the questions that it brings, I invite you to consider that many of the answers may lie somewhere that you don’t expect. It is beautiful and satisfying, and even world-changing, to realize that Nature responds to the feeling connections we make with each other; we are living in a heart-shaped world! However it is something even more to be that heart! Peace.


Gary S. Bobroff is an author, workshop leader and a Jungian and archetypal coach. He presents the depth of Jungian approaches in an engaging, accessible and visual-oriented form. He is the developer and facilitator of Archetypal Nature and the founder of JungianOnline.com connecting clients with Jungian-oriented therapists worldwide (via phone or Skype). He is the co-facilitator of the Synchronicity & the Archetypal Feminine video series. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Philosophy from the University of British Columbia, Canada and Master’s degree in Psychology from Pacifica Graduate Institute. Andrew Harvey called his book, Crop Circles, Jung & the Reemergence of the Archetypal Feminine “an original masterpiece.“ – GSBobroff.com

Jung, Sheldrake, and Synchronicity—Gary Bobroff with BonnieBright for Depth Insights

Gary Bobroff, M.A. in conversation with Bonnie Bright, Ph.D. for Depth Insights as they discuss C. G. Jung, Rupert Sheldrake, and Synchronicity. Gary offers insights into where these two great thinkers intersect and shares stories and insights on synchronicity. Gary is hosting a webinar series on the topic starting September 2015.
Visit http://www.DepthInsights.com or the free online community, http://www.DepthPsychologyAlliance.com for more depth psychology-related news and content.

Find Gary’s work at http://www.ArchetypalNature.com

Staying Sharp: 9 Keys for a Youthful Brain through Modern Science and Ageless Wisdom By Henry Emmons, MD and David Alter, PhD

The book Dr. Christiane Northrup promised “will change your mind and your brain in the best possible way,” Staying Sharp is the practical guidebook for building and maintaining a sharp, healthy, and vibrant mind.

A strong memory and a healthy brain aren’t as difficult to maintain as one might think. Combining the latest neuroscience research with age-old wisdom about resilience, mindfulness, and stress reduction, Drs. Henry Emmons and David Alter show that vibrant aging is within reach. Together they demonstrate how to blend the best of modern science and Eastern holistic medicine to form a powerful drug-free program that will maintain a youthful mind and a happy life.

With more than fifty-five years of combined experience in the fields of neuroscience and psychiatry, Dr. Emmons and Dr. Alter have taken their expertise and translated the fundamentals of brain science into an easily accessible collection of the nine key lessons proven to preserve and strengthen mental acuity. Filled with easy-to-understand theories and practical exercises to work out your brain, Staying Sharp provides you with “reliable information on how to minimize cognitive decline” (The New York Times) so you can live more joyfully, age more gracefully, and build intimacy in your relationships, no matter what your age.


Henry Emmons, MD, is a psychiatrist who integrates mind-body and natural therapies, mindfulness and allied Buddhist therapeutics, and psychotherapeutic caring and insight in his clinical work. Dr. Emmons is in demand as a workshop and retreat leader for both healthcare professionals and the general public.


David Alter, PhD was born in Minneapolis, MN but lived in 4 states and 3 continents by the time he was five years old. Those early experiences with language, dialect and culture helped shape his curiosity for how people live, how they express themselves and how they are shaped by their environments. Now, having practiced as a clinical neurologist/health psychologist for 30 years, always focusing on the evolving nature of our mind and our brain in relation to our social surroundings, he has translated his acquired experiences into his first published work (Staying Sharp, with co-author H. Emmons, MD). This non-fiction book about aging well reflects his inherent optimism about what is possible for us as time passes and grounds his findings and suggestions in solid neuroscience about what it takes to cultivate and maintain a healthy brain throughout the second half of life. Currently, he is joyfully engaged in practicing what he preaches.

He is an active teacher and trainer around the country, leading workshops and retreats and invited talks to both general and professional audiences.

LOOK INSIDE

Keeping Your Brain Youthful With Sleep

Published on Jul 25, 2016

Dr. Henry Emmons and Dr. David Alter, authors of STAYING SHARP, debunk myths surrounding the needs of the aging brain and explain how sleep can actually help keep your mind youthful and healthy.

Living in Harmony With Time: How to relate positively to time by Steve Taylor PhD

We normally see time as our enemy…

We feel that it’s running way from us, bringing good experiences to an end too soon, and taking away our youth, our fitness, our good looks, and eventually even our lives themselves. We’re continually fighting against time to meet deadliness and make appointments. But since time is an ever-present factor in our lives, it’s essential for us to find a positive way of relating to it. Is it possible for us to live in harmony with time?

Throughout my life I’ve veered between two different attitudes to time, both of them positive in their different ways. These could be called the ‘positive pressure perspective’ and the ‘transcendent perspective’.

The ‘Positive Pressure Perspective’

The first perspective sees time as a precious commodity which shouldn’t be wasted. Ultimately, this is based on awareness of death. The fact that we are all going to die at some point means that our time in this life is limited. Time is slipping away from us every moment, so it’s incumbent on us to use it productively, to fulfil our potential, to achieve as much as we can, to do what we were meant to do. Life is temporary, so we should make the most of it.

This perspective can be very energising. I think of myself primarily as I writer, and I feel that there are a lot of books inside me that I have to write before I die. So sometimes when I feel a little lazy or lacking in motivation, the thought that time is limited – that I’m going to die eventually and could potentially die at any moment – can jolt me out of my indolence. ‘I haven’t got time to waste!’ I tell myself. ‘I have to get on and do what I’m meant to do!’ I already have my next three books planned out in my mind, and would be very disappointed if I ‘ran out of time’ before I was able to bring them into existence.

This view of time can be problematic though. It creates pressure, and can lead to an obsessive concern with not ‘wasting’ time. Every minute that is not deemed ‘productive’ is seen as worthless. It may mean that we’re unwilling to relax, even when we’re mentally and physically exhausted, and when we would actually become more productive if we allowed ourselves to take it easy. And more fundamentally, this attitude pre-supposes a duality between us and time. It views time as external force which we have to continually struggle against – and which will ultimately be victorious against us.

There is no Time except the Present – the ‘Transcendent Perspective’

The second perspective has a less combative attitude towards time – in fact, it doesn’t even accept its existence, at least in the normal sense. It sees linear time as a construct, a creation of the human mind (and of human culture). After all, the future is not a real phenomenon. It does not exist, except in our thoughts, in our anticipations and our plans. Similarly, the past is not a real phenomenon. All past events have faded away into non-existence. They only exist in our memory, and in the recordings we may make of them. We live our lives wholly and continually in the present. And in the present, there is no time. As a culture, we have decided to divide time into seconds, minutes, hours and days, but this has no basis in experiential terms. In the present, there is just a continual flow of experience. There are no isolated moments, or instants, there is just a flow. And we are part of the flow.

From this point of view, there is no need to worry about time passing. The present doesn’t pass away – its always with us. It stretches panoramically around us, without direction and without the divisions of different tenses.

This second attitude is obviously the healthier one. It frees from the stress and pressure of trying to keep up with time. It means that we live more naturally and authentically, in tune with our deeper impulses, doing things when we feel it’s right to do them, rather than forcing ourselves.

If there is a possible disadvantage to this ‘transcendent’ perspective of time though, it is that it may take away our sense of urgency, and reduce our motivation to complete tasks. It’s an unfortunate aspect of modern life that we often need to complete tasks and meet deadlines, but in a state of present-ness, it’s sometimes difficult to muster the self-discipline to do this. If the present is like an ocean all around us, and the future doesn’t really exist, why should we feel any sense of urgency? Why should I work hard to complete the latest chapter of my book? Why should I make an effort to meet my publisher’s deadline?

Integrating the Two Perspectives

However, I don’t think these two perspectives are necessarily incompatible. They can be integrated when we consider that, although linear time may not exist in the sense we normally think of it, duration still exists. That is, although we always live in the present, processes still take place, and those processes have a duration. They arise, they unfold and manifest themselves, and then they slowly fade away. Seconds, minutes and hours are just artificial man-made divisions, but processes such as days, months and years do exist.

And our lives are a process too. This process always takes place in the present, but we also know that it has a limited duration. Even though there is no future and no past, it’s still important for us to fulfil our potential while we can. It’s still important for us to uncover our authentic selves, to develop our skills and allow our creativity to express itself. We should still feel a sense of the brevity and fragility of the process of our lives, and feel an urgency to experience the process as fully and intensely as possible – at the same time as being aware that, as we do this, we can never be anywhere except the present.

Steve Taylor is a Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Leeds Beckett University. He is the author of Making Time. His website is stevenmtaylor.com
Source: Psychology Today

John Astin – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview


John Astin is the author of three collections of poetic and prose reflections on the non-dual nature of reality, Too Intimate for Words, (2005) This Is Always Enough(2007), and Searching for Rain in a Monsoon (2012). He is presently at work on a new book, It’s Not What You Think It Is: Reflections on the Inconceivable Nature of Reality. Along with his writing and teaching, John is also a singer, songwriter and recording artist who since 1987 has produced seven CDs of original spiritual/contemplative music including his most recent release, What We’ve Always Been.

In addition to his writing and music, John also holds a PhD in health psychology and is an internationally acclaimed scholar in the field of mind-body medicine, his research focusing on the applications of meditative/contemplative practices in psychology and health care.

For information about John’s work, visit http://www.johnastin.com.

Music CDs: What We’ve Always Been Already Shining Clear Blue Mind Now Is the Time For more see http://johnastin.com/music

Interview recorded 1/9/2016

Stanislav Grof – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview


Published on Jan 7, 2016

Also see https://batgap.com/stanislav-grof/

Stan Grof, M.D., Ph.D. is a psychiatrist with more than fifty years’ experience researching the healing and transformative potential of non-ordinary states of consciousness. His groundbreaking theories influenced the integration of Western science with his brilliant mapping of the transpersonal dimension. He is one of the founders and chief theoreticians of Transpersonal Psychology and received an Honorary Award for major contributions to and development of the field of Transpersonal Psychology from the Association for Transpersonal Psychology in 1993. Dr. Grof is also the founder of the International Transpersonal Association (ITA) and its past and current president. He has organized large international conferences throughout the world and continues to lecture and teach professional training programs in Holotropic Breathwork and transpersonal psychology. Currently, Dr. Grof is Professor of Psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS) in the Department of Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness, and teaches at the Pacifica Graduate Institute in Santa Barbara, CA.

Website: http://stanislavgrof.com

Some of Dr. Grof’s many books: Healing Our Deepest Wounds: The Holotropic Paradigm Shift The Ultimate Journey: Consciousness and the Mystery of Death When the Impossible Happens: Adventures in Non-Ordinary Reality Holotropic Breathwork: A New Approach to Self-Exploration and Therapy (Suny Series in Transpersonal and Humanistic Psychology) The Holotropic Mind: The Three Levels of Human Consciousness and How They Shape Our Lives Spiritual Emergency: When Personal Transformation Becomes a Crisis (New Consciousness Readers) The Adventure of Self-Discovery: Dimensions of Consciousness and New Perspectives in Psychotherapy and Inner Exploration (SUNY Series in Transpersonal and Humanistic Psychology) LSD: Doorway to the Numinous: The Groundbreaking Psychedelic Research into Realms of the Human Unconscious The Cosmic Game: Explorations of the Frontiers of Human Consciousness (S U N Y Series in Transpersonal and Humanistic Psychology) The Stormy Search for the Self: A Guide to Personal Growth through Transformational Crisis

Interview conducted 10/24/2015 at the Science and Nonduality Conference

Inhabiting Heaven NOW: The Answer to Every Moral Dilemma Ever Posed by Andrea Mathews (Author)

Heaven. We say the word with both a hope of long-awaited bliss and a certain but wistful knowledge that the wait will continue. Life is hard, we say, and the world will end with a whimper or a bang by the hands of blind and evil humans. But then there’s heaven. Yet, what if heaven could be experienced every day right here, right now on planet earth – and the only thing that keeps that from happening is the lie. The lie that we are separate from the Divine due to our polarized sinful, bad, even evil natures. What if, because we are blinded by that lie, we cannot see that we are already living in heaven, in fact, we ARE heaven? And what if those truths could actually be found in the Bible itself, as well as in all of the other sacred texts of the world? What if all that really needs to happen is that the scales fall off of our eyes? If that were true – would you be willing to see? Inhabiting Heaven NOW offers such a brilliant, transformative light that you will not be able, after the read, to turn it off. Its arguments are so lucid, its truths so profound, and its simultaneous practicality so real that the reader simply cannot walk away unchanged.


Psychotherapist, author, speaker and radio host, Andrea Mathews promotes authenticity and the authentic self in every endeavor. Andrea believes, as the old Buddhist saying goes that “The seeker is that which is being sought.” What we don’t know, have forgotten or repressed, is the fact that the seeker is the soul and the finder is also the soul. When we get this, we can really “cease striving” to know that I AM, we are, God.

Andrea Mathews is a psychotherapist with a thriving private practice, offering Transpersonal Therapy to her clients for the past seventeen of her overall thirty years’ experience as a therapist, manager and a supervisor of therapists, in the Substance Abuse and Mental Health field.

She is the author of three books, RESTORING MY SOUL: A WORKBOOK FOR FINDING AND LIVING THE AUTHENTIC SELF (2007), and THE LAW OF ATTRACTION: THE SOUL’S ANSWER TO WHY IT ISN’T WORKING AND HOW IT CAN (2011), and INHABITING HEAVEN NOW: THE ANSWER TO EVERY MORAL DILEMMA EVER POSED (2013), as well as several articles in national and international magazines, and several poems in literary presses. An inspirational speaker to both corporations and large and small groups, Andrea’s theme is always authenticity. For the past five years she has been the host of the AUTHENTIC LIVING SHOW on VoiceAmerica.com, with over 150,000 listeners, having interviewed some of the world’s most profound and prolific spiritual teachers, authors and entertainers, including many who have also been interviewed by Oprah, such as Marianne Williamson, Gary Zukav, Caroline Myss, Dr. Larry Dossey, Dr. Christiane Northrup, Tom Shadyac and many others.

View Here

Susun Weed interviews psychotherpist and author Andrea Mathews

Spiritual and Religious Competencies in Clinical Practice: Guidelines for Psychotherapists and Mental Health Professionals (book) by Cassandra Vieten PhD, Shelley Scammell PsyD

Religion lies at the heart of many clients’ core values, and helps shape their perception of themselves and the world around them. In this book, two clinical psychologists provide a much-needed, research-based road map to help professionals appropriately address their clients’ spiritual or religious beliefs in treatment sessions.

More and more, it has become essential for mental health professionals to understand and competently navigate clients’ religious and spiritual beliefs in treatment. In Spiritual and Religious Competencies in Clinical Practice, you’ll find sixteen research-based guidelines and best practices to help you provide effective therapy while being conscious of your clients’ unique spiritual or cultural background.

With this professional resource as your guide, you will be prepared to:

  • Take a spiritual and religious history when treating a client
  • Attend to spiritual or religious topics in a clinical setting
  • Hold clear ethical boundaries regarding your own religious or spiritual beliefs
  • Know when and how to make referrals if topics emerge which are beyond the scope of your competence

This book is a must-read for any mental health professional looking to develop spiritual, religious, and cultural competencies.

About the Author

Cassandra Vieten, PhD, is a licensed clinical psychologist, president and CEO of the Institute of Noetic Sciences, and a scientist in the Mind-Body Medicine Research Group at the California Pacific Medical Center Research Institute. Her research has focused on spirituality and health, development and pilot testing of mindfulness-based approaches to cultivating emotional balance, and transformative experiences and practices. She is coauthor of Living Deeply (New Harbinger/Noetic Books 2008) and author of Mindful Motherhood (New Harbinger 2009).

Shelley Scammell, PsyD, is a licensed clinical psychologist with a twenty-year practice in the San Francisco Bay Area. She is an adjunct professor at the California Institute of Integral Studies, and has taught psychology at Sonoma State University, as well as at the American College of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Formerly, she was an associate professor of English at New York University, and taught at Baruch College and Mount Holyoke. As copresident of the Institute for Spirituality and Psychology, she was fundamental in developing the sixteen competencies. She has published articles on the competencies in APA journals as well as presented them at several APA national conventions. Her extensive background in Western and Eastern spiritual practices and studies has informed her diagnosis and treatment of clients in spiritual struggles. Her clinical experience has fostered a desire to share this expertise with fellow clinicians.

Foreword writer Daniel J. Siegel, MD, is executive director of the Mindsight Institute and associate clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, Los Angeles School of Medicine. He is author of The Developing Mind, The Mindful Brain, and other books, and founding editor of the Norton Series on Interpersonal Neurobiology.

View Here

Spiritual & Religious Competencies in Clinical Practice

Published on Nov 4, 2015

Cassandra Vieten and co-author Shelley Scammell talk about their new book: Spiritual & Religious Competencies in Clinical Practice: Guidelines for Psychotherapists and Mental Health Professionals. Purchase the book at: http://store.noetic.org/Spiritual-and…

Carl Jung: The Wounded Healer of the Soul ~ Claire Dunne [updated Oct 28, 2015]

“Carl Jung: Wounded Healer of the Soul” is a spiritual biography of one of the most important figures of the twentieth century, a man whose ideas revolutionized modern psychology. Through over 150 full-color and black and white illustrations, including rare photographs and never-before-seen artwork by Jung himself, his life and work comes vividly to life.

By combining Jung’s voice with the impressions of his contemporaries, author Claire Dunne gives the reader a multi-dimensional view of this complex genius. A book that will deepen and expand the understanding of both novice and expert. “Claire Dunne’s sensitivity of feeling for her subject allows us to meet Jung in all his diverse complexity — his contradictions and paradox, human failings and strength, his greatness and creativity. We meet a man at once transparent to transcendence but also earthy, practical, a craftsman of wood and stone as well as souls.” — From the introduction by Jean Houston.

This beautifully illustrated biography tells the story of one of the most influential thinkers of the 20th century. Carl Jung continues to be revered today as a true revolutionary who changed our views of psychology, introduced the West to Eastern spirituality and brought into general awareness such important concepts as archetypes, the collective unconscious and synchronicity.

In this book lecturer, author and broadcaster Claire Dunne chronicles Jung’s journey of self-discovery from his childhood, filled with visions both terrifying and profound, through to his early adulthood when he pursued more material goals, to his rediscovery of spirituality at mid-life. Special attention is paid to the tumultuous relationship between Jung and his one-time mentor Sigmund Freud, the unconventional yet vital role performed by his student Toni Wolff, and the revelatory visions Jung experienced following a close brush with death.

The words of Jung himself and those who shared his work and private life are presented verbatim, interspersed with Claire Dunne’s lively and accessible commentary and an evocative array of illustrations including photos of Jung, his associates and the environments in which he lived and worked, as well as art images both ancient and contemporary that reflect Jung’s teachings. Jung emerges as a healer whose skills arose from having first attended to the wounds in his own soul. This is an essential book for everyone interested in psychology, spirituality and personal development.

Claire Dunne is an author, broadcaster and producer who has lectured around the world on Carl Jung and many other subjects. Born in Ireland and a resident of Australia for many years, she founded two Australian multicultural radio stations and was awarded the Medal of the Order of Australia for her contributions to multicultural education and broadcasting.
Claire Dunne: Carl Jung–Wounded Healer of the Soul

Claire Dunne is an author, broadcaster and producer who has lectured around the world on Carl Jung and many other subjects. Her diverse career in radio, television and film ranges from documentaries on Sigmund Freud to the history of the harp. Born in Ireland and resident in Sydney for many years, she was awarded an OAM honour by the Australian Government for her work in multiculturalism, Celtic culture and ethnic broadcasting.

Claire Dunne’s acclaimed illustrated biography “Carl Jung: Wounded Healer of the Soul” was nominated for the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and is being translated into a number of languages. Originally published in 2000 to great acclaim, this new edition has a specially written introduction from the author and a foreword by Olivier Bernier, Director of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY.

Claire Dunne reads from ‘Carl Jung: Wounded Healer of the Soul’

Dr. John Prendergast ~ NondualityTalk


Published on Oct 5, 2015
This interview was conducted on September 27, 2015.

Dr. John Prendergast is a retired professor of psychology at the California Institute of Integral Studies and a psychotherapist in private practice in San Rafael, California. He has led self-inquiry groups for over a decade and offers workshops and retreats. His website is http://www.listeningfromsilence.com

John is a longtime student of nondual teachings, having deeply studied with Jean Klein and Adyashanti. He is the author of the recently released In Touch: How to Tune in to the Inner Guidance of Your Body and Trust Yourself (Sounds True, 2015) View Here and senior editor of The Sacred Mirror: Nondual Wisdom and Psychotherapy (2003) and Listening from the Heart of Silence (2007). He is also the editor-in-chief of Undivided: The Online Journal of Nonduality and Psychology.

John writes, “My approach to psychotherapy is presence-centered and body-based. As we learn to relax into the timeless now and be with our body/mind just as it is, an inner wisdom and direction unfolds. We all have an innate sense of the truth, an inner knowing that arises out of a willingness to relinquish the illusion of control and to rest in not-knowing.”

In this conversation we cover the main themes of his book, In Touch. They include…

Felt sensing and the energy body. One of the most common forms of experiencing the energy body is also one of the most painful: heartbreak.

Questioning Core Beliefs, Dialoguing with the Inner Critic, and Witnessing Thoughts.

Relaxed Groundedness: As we attune with inner knowing, we experience a deep relaxation in the core of our body and a growing sense of groundedness.

– Inner Alignment: There is a sense of things lining up and falling into place inside. An inner verticality opens up that we can sense as a line running through the core of the body, extending high above and far beneath. … inner alignment also brings a sense of aliveness, which differs from excitement.

Openheartedness: The human heart opens into a nonlocalized Great Heart that is capable of embracing the suffering of humanity. Discovering and consciously living from both the Great Heart and the soulful depths of the human heart brings the deepest happiness as human beings.

Spaciousness : When we get in touch with our inner knowing, there is often a sense of vast space within and around our bodies, and this subjective sense of space is almost always accompanied by a deep silence. Genuine openness is very still.

Fruits of inner knowing: Self-Recognition, The Great Intimacy

Sacred Ordinary: As the body awakens, so does the world. When we discover that the core of the body is made up of empty, vibrant, and wakeful openness, we experience the world differently. The world as other dissolves and becomes intimate. As a result, our ordinary experience is suffused with a sense of the sacred. We discover what I like to call the sacred ordinary. We feel grateful for no reason.

Dr. John Prendergast, http://www.listeningfromsilence.com

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