Deepak Chopra about his new novel on the life of Muhammad

Full interview with Alan Steinfeld and Deepak Chopra about his latest book Muhammad: A Story of the Last Prophet

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Dark Night of the Soul: St. John Of The Cross; translation by Mirabai Starr (Author)


Dark Night of the Soul
While imprisoned in a tiny prison cell for his attempts to reform the Church, sixteenth-century Spanish mystic John of the Cross composed many of his now classic poems of the soul’s longing for God. Written on a scroll smuggled to him by one of his guards, his songs are the ultimate expression of the spiritual seeker’s journey from estranged despair to blissful union with the divine

After escaping his captors, John fell into a state of profound ecstasy and wrote Dark Night of the Soul. Later, he added an important commentary to his poem to guide other searching souls along the arduous path to communion with God. Here, for the first time, a scholar unaffiliated with the Catholic Church has translated this timeless work.

Mirabai Starr, who has studied Buddhism, Hinduism, and Judaism, lends the seeker’s sensibility to John’s powerful text and brings this classic work to the twenty-first century in a brilliant and beautiful rendering

Mirabai Starr – Reading – From “Dark Night of the Soul”

Naked Spirituality: A Life with God in 12 Simple Words by Brian D. McLaren (Author) [updated Oct 17, 2017]

Christianity is in crisis. Many sincere Christians feel their traditional Christian practices are in danger of becoming irrelevant, empty rituals. In his previous book A New Kind of Christianity, Brian D. McLaren offered new biblical models for how we understand the central ideas of a faith that provides hope for restoring and reinvigorating the power of the gospels to transform us and our communities.

In Naked Spirituality, McLaren takes his prophetic work a step further by confronting how the lack of a simple, doable, durable spirituality undermines the very transformation God is calling us to undergo. As a result, our religious structures become tools to maintain the status quo and not catalysts for personal and social change. McLaren presents a four-stage framework for understanding the spiritual life, and he unfolds spiritual practices appropriate to each stage. Each practice is rooted in a simple word: here, thanks, O, sorry, help, please, when, no, why, behold, yes, and silence.

 Naked Spirituality offers accessible, practical wisdom for living a truly spiritual life. Staying true to Jesus’s core message while engaging faithfully with our postmodern world, McLaren presents a proven spiritual program for engaging in and sustaining a meaningful relationship with God.


Brian D. McLaren, hailed as one of America’s 25 most influential evangelicals by Time magazine, is a speaker, social justice activist, pastor, and the author of A John Lockley is a traditionally trained African Shaman known as a Sangoma from Nelson Mandela’s tribe, the Xhosa nation. He also has a background in Zen Buddhism and was a student of the late Zen Master Su Bong from South Korea. He holds an honors degree in Clinical Psychology and specialised in health psychology with an interest in trauma and how people recover from life threatening illnesses like cancer. For the last 10 years, he has been running ‘Ubuntu’ (humanity) retreats worldwide helping people to reconnect to their essential humanity; their bones (ancestors), dreams, and ultimately, life purpose. His mission in the Western world could be summed up in the Xhosa word ‘Masiyembo’ – involving a profound remembering of the human spirit. As John says, “when people can remember their dreams and connect to their life purpose, then their true vocation surfaces; namely being in service and acting as guardians to our planet”. Book: Leopard Warrior – A Journey into the African Teachings of Ancestry, Instinct, and Dreams Audio: The Way of the Leopard – Meditations and Shamanic Practices from the Heart of Africa New Kind of Christianity, A Generous Orthodoxy, A New Kind of Christian, and The Secret Message of Jesus. McLaren has appeared on Nightline and Larry King Live, and his work has been covered in The Washington Post, the New York Times, Christianity Today, and many other publications. McLaren and his wife, Grace, live in Florida and have four adult children.

Are You Ready to be Spiritually Naked? Naked Spirituality by Brian McLaren

Church leader Brian McLaren reinvigorates our approach to spiritual fulfillment in Naked Spirituality—by tearing down the old dogmatic practices that hamper our spiritual sensitivity, and leading us toward the meaningful spiritual practices that can help transform our lives.

Naked Spirituality: A Life with God in 12 Simple Words
http://www.harpercollins.com/books/Na…
By Brian D. McLaren

God A HUMAN HISTORY By REZA ASLAN

The #1 New York Times bestselling author of Zealot and host of Believer explores humanity’s quest to make sense of the divine, and sounds a call to embrace a deeper, more expansive understanding of God.

In Zealot, Reza Aslan replaced the staid, well-worn portrayal of Jesus of Nazareth with a startling new image of the man in all his contradictions. In his new book, Aslan takes on a subject even more immense: God, writ large.

In layered prose and with thoughtful, accessible scholarship, Aslan narrates the history of religion as one long and remarkably cohesive attempt to understand the divine by giving it human traits and emotions. According to Aslan, this innate desire to humanize God is hardwired in our brains, making it a central feature of nearly every religious tradition. As Aslan writes, “Whether we are aware of it or not, and regardless of whether we’re believers or not, what the vast majority of us think about when we think about God is a divine version of ourselves.”

But this projection is not without consequences. We bestow upon God not just all that is good in human nature—our compassion, our thirst for justice—but all that is bad in it: our greed, our bigotry, our penchant for violence. All these qualities inform our religions, cultures, and governments.

More than just a history of our understanding of God, this book is an attempt to get to the root of this humanizing impulse in order to develop a more universal spirituality. Whether you believe in one God, many gods, or no god at all, God: A Human History will challenge the way you think about the divine and its role in our everyday lives.

Photo: © Hilary Jones

Reza Aslan is an acclaimed writer and scholar of religions whose books include No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam and Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth. He is also the author of How to Win a Cosmic War: God, Globalization, and the End of the War on Terror (published in paperback as Beyond Fundamentalism), as well as the editor of Tablet & Pen: Literary Landscapes from the Modern Middle East. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife and three sons.

Reza Aslan – Talk to Al Jazeera

Reza Aslan is an Iranian-American scholar of world religions and the author of several books on faith. His most recent book, “Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth”, is a best-seller — and controversial.

He sat down with Tony Harris to talk about how he became acquainted with the subject of his latest book, as well as converting from Islam to evangelical Christianity before returning to the religion of his birth.

Sheikh Burhanuddin ‘The Journey Of A Modern Sufi Mystic’ Interview by Iain McNay


Published on Feb 19, 2017

Sheikh Burhanuddin talks about his fascinating journey and experiences along his way to become a Sheikh under the guidance of his master, Sheikh Nazim. From an early age when he was very drawn to be in nature he soon committed his life to finding a master who could guide him on his path. His spent time on different ‘seclusions’ which were very influential and helpful him with many realizations. He also had a session with spiritual healer Stephen Turoff which triggered a very deep state which lasted for nearly 3 years. He goes on to explain the Uwaysi System which is now an integral part of his teaching.

Walk Out of Your Dream: A Meeting With Adyashanti ~ by Mark Matousek


What do spiritual masters know about the mind?

Adyashanti is an American-born spiritual teacher devoted to serving the awakening of all beings. His teachings are an open invitation to stop, inquire, and recognize what is true and liberating at the core of all existence. He is the author of The Way of Liberation, Falling into Grace, True Meditation, and Resurrecting Jesus: Embodying the Spirit of a Revolutionary Mystic. I’ve done a number of retreats with Adya who is in my estimation one of the three truly original spiritual thinkers of our moment, the other two being Eckhart Tolle and Byron Katie. We had a great time talking about the process of enlightenment and how Christianity lost its way.

Mark Matousek: I was surprised to see you’d written a book about Jesus, considering your background in Zen Buddhism. How did that happen?

Adyashanti: It really was a labor of love. For the last two or three years, I’ve been doing one retreat a year that focuses on Jesus’s teachings, so this was a natural outgrowth of that.

MM: Why did you choose to emphasize the revolutionary Jesus?

A: That’s a characteristic of Jesus that speaks to me. When I was practicing Zen Buddhism intensively during my twenties, I went through this period of being involved with the Christian mystics. There was something I wasn’t finding in my Zen practice. Many years later I realized that what I was looking for was the opening of the spiritual heart. I got around to reading the New Testament and I didn’t even recognize the Jesus in those gospels. I literally thought, who is this guy? He came off as such a revolutionary. He was very outspoken about the issues of his day, the power structure of his own religion, political issues, and so on. In contrast to the typical Eastern sage removed from society, Jesus was very much a man of the world. We grow up with this idea of him as some sort of God-man transcendent of everything then you read the gospels and find out that he wasn’t at all. He had some very human characteristics.

MM: Is there a conflict for you between Christianity, which posits faith in God, and Buddhism that denies God’s existence?

A: From a theological perspective, there are obviously some very great differences. Personally, though, I don’t find a conflict because I look at these things from a big view and not through a tight theological lens. Both Jesus and Buddha are representations of archetypal spiritual patterns within us. The Buddha is the archetypal image of transcendent realization, that which was never touched by time and the world, nor by human difficulty. The Jesus story is an archetype of something quite different: an engaged realization. Jesus doesn’t find his freedom through transcendence of the world but from a very, very deep engagement. In the Jesus story itself, the spirit of heaven descends upon Jesus, which is a very different kind of spiritual awakening. It’s the descent of spirit into form rather than the arising spirit waking up out of form. Both of these are legitimate approaches to awakening. Our Western spiritual traditions, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity, aim at achieving a relationship with the divine, whereas the Eastern, non-dual traditions aim at identification with (or as) the divine. At times, what’s missing from non-dual practice is the spiritual heart. You can have an extraordinary amount of transcendent realization without the spiritual heart, which is a deep, intuitive, intimate connectedness with life around you.

MM: In Resurrecting Jesus, you write, “the search for the historical Jesus isn’t the point. The point is the story, the collective dream.” What is to be gained by rediscovering the power of the collective dream?

A: In the West, when you call something a myth you are basically saying it’s not true. That’s a complete misunderstanding of what myth actually is, though. Myth is a story meant to convey something that can’t be put in ordinary language. So when we look at something like the Jesus story mythologically without worrying about how much is true, we can enter into a creative relationship with the story. Instead of asking what Jesus actually said, we can ask what this story evokes in us. Myths are meant to evoke hidden dimensions of human consciousness. The Jesus story becomes much more powerful in this way, as well as healing. We’ve grown up in a culture that’s absolutely dripping and saturated with this story. It has an immense influence on the Western psyche and if we can’t make real peace with that story, it becomes like a wound that doesn’t heal.

MM: The wound of Christianity?

A: The wound of how we’ve understood Christianity. I’ll give you an example. Part of the Judeo Christian tradition is the idea of Original Sin. As a result, you have this rampant disease of unworthiness in Western cultures that, for the better part of 2,500 years, have lived with this mythology of the fall. Until we can reinterpret this story, it’s very, very hard to heal the wound of feeling unworthy. We have to be able to go back and look at it again with fresh eyes. Jesus didn’t go around telling people that they were unworthy. It’s the theologians that went around after he died telling people they were unworthy. That never entered into any of Jesus’s dialogues at all.

MM: You write that Zen taught you about “the dimension of being far beyond personal psychology.” How would you describe this dimension?

A: There is a dimension of experience within you that’s eternal and has no history. It has no time, it has no past, it has no personality, it has no karma, it has no problem. It’s the dimension of consciousness that is literally outside of time and everything that touches time. The non-dual traditions, such as Zen, are very, very powerful at evoking that dimension of human experience. But this doesn’t necessarily solve problems relating to personal psychology. So you can be very deeply rooted in a very transcendent experience of being and still have some very problematic, unresolved issues in your psychology.

MM: As someone who lives in this dimension most of the time, do you struggle with emotions and conflict in daily life?

A: There hasn’t really been much struggle for the past ten years or so. Of course, it could be different when I get out of bed tomorrow. (laughs) The underlying feeling state for me is contentment. It’s a serene kind of joy that underlies everything. At first, I had a very powerful awakening to eternity and then, over the ensuing years, my spirituality moved toward embracing everything that I had transcended, the nature of human emotion, personality, and so on. What I’ve found is that the dimension of eternity and the dimension of time are really one in the same. I just feel at ease with it all. I’m at ease with my humanity. I’m at ease with eternity. I’m at ease with life. It doesn’t mean that everything goes smoothly. I’m like everybody else. Life has its challenges but it’s just not a big deal. There’s an underlying sense of ease and Ok-ness.

MM: What do you find most challenging?

A: To be quite honest, very trivial things. The thing I probably find most challenging in personal life is my computer. I’m not joking. The bigger things aren’t big challenges for me anymore. But I can get frustrated at my computer and the first thing you’ll hear is me yelling for my wife to come help me. Mukti, come and save me from this device! I found the devil and it’s a computer. Strangely enough, when humans don’t do the things you might expect them to do, that’s not really very frustrating to me. I totally get that.

MM: You don’t get angry at people?

A: No, not really. Years ago, I had this realization, this experience, where something just finally completely fell away. The whole self-structure, which is the thing that’s always looking within. The turn of consciousness that’s always evaluating things. The whole self-structure just sort of fell away. The most honest way I can describe it is that I lost my inner world. So when things happen, they just happen. There’s not much inner life for them to affect.

MM: There’s nothing to protect.

A: Right. There’s nothing to protect. There’s no inner story that feels compelled to protect itself.

MM: Finally, I’d like to ask you about the notion of divine incarnation, regarding Jesus, Buddha, or anyone else described as an avatar. How do you interpret that?

A: I think that every single incarnation is a divine incarnation. I know nothing nor do I care to know about avatars. I think “avatar” is an idea. And the idea is separative. It assumes that there are divine incarnations as opposed to what? Other people that aren’t divine? How can that possibly be? Because one person has realized it and another hasn’t? If somebody hasn’t discovered their true nature it doesn’t make them one iota less divine. Some people may come into their incarnation never having forgotten their true nature; if someone wants to call that person an avatar, fine. But when we think that avatars have some sort of “more essential divinity,” we’re back in the world of separation, duality, and mind-made divisions that aren’t really there. If someone is born in full remembrance of who they are, good for them.. But that doesn’t mean they have more divinity than a heroin addict in the gutter. The heroin addict doesn’t know that they’re divine —that’s the difference. It’s a relative difference, not an essential difference. And that’s what I love about the Jesus story. He got made into an avatar and the God-man and all this stuff after he died, but his way of moving in the world was very ordinary. He was a very outspoken critic of the various ways that us human beings create divisions and then take advantage of those divisions. That’s why I say that enlightenment doesn’t raise you, it actually lowers you because you see the reality of all beings. Not just your beings, but all beings. Otherwise it’s just an enlightened ego that thinks it’s better than, more spiritual, or whatever. It shows you that all ultimately on the same playing field. We’re the same stuff. In that absolute sense, we are all of profound equality. To me, the enlightened view is the ultimate form of democracy.

Source: The Huffington Post

Dharma: That Is Not Religion by Baba Shuddhaanandaa Brahmachari

As we close our eyes and feel our bodies, we contemplate the trillions of cells performing their individual task with such optimal efficiency and perfection, with such amazing synchronicity… This working together while maintaining the individual space and duty is the foundation of dharma. This is the simplest example where the whole of the cosmos and billions of galaxies are in the infinite space, all and each following their dharma, their path. No clashes. No confusion. No conflict.

But when we come to humanity, although man is an animal like any other species, we use our intelligence, yet always deviate from the path and the truth that is dharma. An animal never kills when its hunger is appeased. But humanity’s greed is insatiable. It can devour the whole world. Human greed is a ghost with a mouth and narrow neck, but a bottomless stomach.

How Can We Seek Balance in Life?

Nature has its own balancing system. It is not that someone has to bring something to it or do something. It is done all the time, like the balancing system of our own body. Through the karmic process of churning and changing, the soul comes to realize certain simple truths of life: that to hurt is to invite hurt, to love is to be loved, to give is the path to receive. Positive thoughts of light bring forth the materialization of happy events and the law of attraction is like the law of gravitation. And this whole universe and tiny planet Earth all are under the law that is dharma. The order. It is commanded by one invisible, ultimate source.

The moment we give that source a name, religious dogmas come with it, and our ego takes over its bounden task of proving my God is bigger, better, richer than yours. The whole order is ransacked in the name of God. That is the human tendency.

Is Dharma Like a Religion?

Dharma is not religion, like Christianity, nor Buddhism, nor Judaism, nor Hinduism, nor Islam. The world has seen a river of blood flowing all over in the name of religion. Dharma is the order, the law that governs the subtle textures that are all interconnected and interwoven with love and light.

We are gradually moving toward that Light, which is the essence of all existence. We are moving toward that source which defies all foolish human definitions and creating of religions. We have had enough of religions. Enough of fanaticism and bloodshed. The Spiritual global movement is inspiring and motivating humanity toward the common goal of LOVE FOR EACH OTHER: Vasudhaiva Kutumbakam. The world is one human family moving toward the religionless world of love and gratitude.

Yes, that day is not far when there will be one dharma, one law, one order that is love and gratitude. All religions will be buried under the manmade ground of greed based civilization and the new age will dawn where there is no more conflict and battles, wars and bloodsheds, but love and peace, harmony and joy.

True dharma will unite humanity as one family. Any religion that does not do that is false.

Shuddhaanandaa Brahmachari (Kolkata, India): Globally acclaimed motivational teacher (mindfulness meditation, stress reduction) author, peacemaker (Man of Peace Award 2012) Visionary social advocate; founded Lokenath Divine Life Mission, 1985. Serves thousands of poverty-stricken individuals in India.

Source: Om Times

Gospel of Thomas: The Way to Eternal Life by Arthur Telling

The Gospel of Thomas, used by followers of Jesus in the early centuries but rejected by the Church,was lost to the ages until a 1945 discovery of its full text, buried in a jar under the Egyptian sand for 1600 years. Told by Jesus to his disciple, Didymos Judas Thomas, scholars consider this gospel one of Christianity’s great discoveries. Some believe it may be older than any of the four New Testament gospels of Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. Composed of a list of 114 sayings of Jesus, some are similar or identical to those in the New Testament. Other Thomas sayings point to a very different message delivered by Jesus than what the Church embraces.

Saying of Jesus in the Gospel of Thomas

One of the more curious Thomas phrases is Saying 22. Within this Saying, Jesus tells his disciples to make “the two into one.” Then, more specifically, He says to “make the inner like the outer and the outer like the inner,” and “make the upper like the lower” and “the male and female into a single one.” This message is neither of salvation through devotion nor of salvation through the story of the Cross, which are at the forefront of the Christian message. It is, rather, a message of awakening the mind, similar to the Eastern philosophies and religions.

Method to Find the Way to Eternal Life

The somewhat-lengthy Saying 22 continues with more yet, offering a method for bringing the two into one, and for making the inner like the outer. Jesus instructs the disciples to “make eyes in place of an eye, a hand in place of a hand, a foot in place of a foot, an image in place of an image,” and upon doing so, “you will enter.” The teaching, as I interpret, is to bring together the various elements of the self. The mind constructs an inner version of the outer world, an imagined reality in place of the actual, experienced, physical world.

What Makes this Way Possible?

To make eyes in place of an eye recognizes the inner eye (the third eye). The physical eyes are a mere extension of it. Recreate in your mind a hand in place of your physical hand, and a foot in place of your physical foot. In making the inner like the outer and the outer like the inner, your imagination and physical being become one.

Next, extend this imagined-self outward. Picture the world that you see as a creation of your mind. Make an image in place of an image, be it walls and a ceiling or the sky and a meadow. Imagine it is your mind constructing the world that you see and experience. It is as though you are awake in a dream, or are seeing a vision. Your every movement will become more exacting and more precise, because you are directing your reality with forethought and exactitude.

In Sustaining the World, We Can Move On

Ultimately, over years or lifetimes, your mind will become steadied and focused, and you will, therefore, be sustaining a world. When your body dies, you will not die; finding eternal life having overcome the entrapping physical matter we call the world.

This understanding of the Jesus message demands a new interpretation of the New Testament gospels, such as the revered Last Supper of Christ. At Passover feast, Jesus breaks the bread and pours the wine, instructing the disciples that the bread is his body, and the wine his blood. It is a lesson on present-moment awareness; the bread and wine the body and lifeblood of the greater self; thus, the inner being of Jesus and of his disciples and of you and I.

The Personal Message in the Gospel of Thomas

The message is a personal one, the bread their own body, and the wine their own lifeblood. The Passover feast is indeed a further step in the process of making a hand in place of a hand, the breaking of bread and a passing of it among friends a communion within the one mind, in the present moment.

In Eastern philosophy, where an awakening of consciousness is the single most important purpose, it is said that a journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step. To make a hand in place of a hand is just such a first step. For devoted Christians, for atheists, for those of any religious, political, or social persuasion, a method is here now, in every waking moment. Both religious rituals and ordinary deeds required for daily living are rich ground for the practitioner. These seeming-redundant activities are a perfect vehicle for making the journey to eternal life.

About the Author

Arthur Telling has written numerous stories and articles on religion, philosophy, and metaphysics. His article, “A Different Jesus Message” appeared in the Nov. 2011 AMORC Rosicrucian Digest. Telling is the author of “Johann’s Awakening” (a parody of Jonathan Livingston Seagull), and three novels including “Kaitlin’s Message,” exploring the secret sayings of the Gospel of Thomas. His web site is: http://www.arthurtelling.com

Source: OM Times

Rabbi Rami Shapiro: Help! I’m Being Threatened with Hell

Roadside Assistance for the Spiritual Traveler

I’m being hounded by evangelicals calling me a sinner and threatening me with Hell. How can I make them stop?

Rabbi Rami: If you politely ask them to leave you alone, and they persist, I suggest deepening the conversation by asking them questions like these: “The God I know loves unconditionally, but yours loves only those who agree with you. Why would I believe in a God who is nothing more than an extension of your ego?” and “For all your insistence that God is love, all your talk is about eternal damnation and Hell. Why do you believe in a God who scares you so?” Tell them the best way to interest you in their faith is to live a life so filled with compassion and love that you are compelled to ask how they achieve it. Living their faith well is more powerful than talking about it endlessly.

What do you make of Ark Encounter, the new Noah’s Ark theme park in Kentucky?

Two thousand years ago Rabbi Ben Bag Bag said, “turn her and turn her for everything is in her” (Pirke Avot 5:19). The “her” is Torah, the Five Books of Moses. Turning Torah is an act of literary creativity and spiritual imagination that continually finds new meanings in this ancient and multilayered text. Ark Encounter flattens the Bible into a one-dimensional cartoon incapable of turning. This is an insult to the Bible, and anyone who loves her should be saddened by what has been done to her.

Like you, I’m Jewish, but I’m not religious. What is your relationship to the religion of Judaism?

Jews are my tribe. Judaism is my culture. But my religion is Perennial Wisdom, a set of four truths found in all religions:

1. All life is a manifesting of a singular process (call it God, Tao, Brahman, Allah, HaShem, Great Spirit, Nature, Mother, etc.).
2. We humans have an innate capacity to realize this process.
3. Living this realization means embracing all beings with justice and compassion.
4 Achieving this realization and the life it engenders is the highest human calling.

I am drawn to those Jewish texts, teachings, and practices that reflect Perennial Wisdom; I am uninterested in those that don’t.

I’m an atheist (there—I said it!), but I’m also partial to Buddhism. Is there such a thing as Buddhist atheism, Buddhism without supernaturalism?

In his very first sermon the Buddha said, “I teach one thing and one thing only: suffering and the ending of suffering.” Original Buddhism was a-theistic, without a God. As Buddhism spread across cultures it absorbed ideas from those cultures, and it developed a variety of supernatural notions about which the Buddha himself knew nothing. Two books might be of help to you: Stephen Bachelor’s Buddhism Without Beliefs and Walpola Rahula’s What the Buddha Taught.

What’s the difference between organized religion and faith, and which of these does the Bible support?

Organized religion is a system of ritual and belief governed by a clerical elite whose primary concern is to maintain power and control over the religious. Faith is the innate human capacity to awaken to and engage directly with Reality manifesting in, with, and as all things. The Bible supports both. When the Bible divides people into Chosen and not Chosen (Deuteronomy 7:6), sheep and goats (Matthew 25:31–33), the saved and the damned (Mark 16:16) it is laying the groundwork for organized religion. When God calls us to be a blessing to all the families of the earth (Genesis 12:3), and when Jesus calls us to follow him rather than worship him (Matthew 16:24), the Bible is speaking of faith. Religion is the easier of the two. Faith the more desperately needed.

I can’t believe that we human beings with all our complexity and genius just come to an end. Don’t you think we must survive death if our lives are to have any meaning?

I don’t think our lives have meaning, I think living is about making meaning. In your way of thinking meaning is dependent upon dying. My way is different: live meaningfully now, and worry about the afterlife only if you find yourself living in one.

My neighbor blames hurricanes, tornadoes, and droughts on God’s hatred of gay people, and yet she said nothing regarding the mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando. This was clearly an attack on gay people done in the name of God. Why is she silent?

Here are two possible reasons: First, chances are the God invoked by the Orlando shooter is not the God invoked by your neighbor, and while both Gods may hate gay people, supporters of each are loathe to credit the other in these matters. Second, invoking God to explain natural disasters is very different from imagining God sending a terrorist as a servant of his wrath to murder 49 innocents. This probably makes God more evil than even your neighbor can handle.

I’m impressed that almost every religion believes in Hell. Does this prove Hell exists?

No, it only proves that religious leaders are good marketers. Religions, or rather certain kinds of religion, use Hell the way toothpaste companies use halitosis, and deodorant companies use body odor: to scare you into buying their product. The fact that each religion reserves Hell for those who violate its particular set of sacred behaviors and beliefs, and not those who violate the beliefs of other religions, suggests that each religion uses Hell for its own benefit. Rather than worry about Hell, do something to make earth a bit more heavenly.
One For The Road

I belong to a very liberal church, and when it comes to religion it is a perfect fit. But politically I am conservative and plan to vote for “He Who Cannot Be Named” (at least not in my church). I’m feeling very isolated, as if I shouldn’t be a member here if I can conceive of voting for him. How can I share my whole life with my church family if I’m judged so harshly?

Share your responses at spiritualityhealth.com/one-for-the-road.

Source: Spirituality & Health

What is the Difference Between Religion and Spirituality? By: Rabbi Rami Shapiro

I’m in recovery and suspect that my addictions keep me from knowing something. But what?

Addictions are like mud on a mirror: when we look into it, we cannot see our true self. Addictions keep us from seeing ourselves as a manifestation of God the way a wave is an extension of an ocean. Moving beyond addiction leads us to the greatest freedom we can know: the freedom to be who we are — creative agents for justice and compassion.

What is the difference between religion and spirituality?

Religion is often about who’s in and who’s out, creating a worldview steeped in “us against them.” Spirituality rejects this dualism and speaks of us and them. Religion is often about loyalty to institutions, clergy, and rules. Spirituality is about loyalty to justice and compassion. Religion talks about God. Spirituality helps to make us godly. The two need not be at odds. Religion at its best is spirituality in community.

As a kid I was deeply wounded by my church, but I want to return. What can I do to protect myself from being traumatized again?

Religious institutions that do harm are those that insist you surrender your will to them, rather than to God. Clergy who do harm are those who insist you worship them, rather than God. When a religion insists it speaks for God and asserts that by rejecting it, you are rejecting God, it is a danger to everyone. If you need a church, make sure it is one that points beyond itself to a God of love, justice, and personal autonomy and freedom. If you need clergy, make sure they free you for God, rather than chain you to themselves and their view of God.

I am tired of listening to pastors rant about sin. Yes, I sin, but I do good things as well. We aren’t sinners; we are doers. Why focus on sin and damnation?

Frightening people with sin and threatening them with eternal damnation is meant to keep people in line. Religion is often about getting people to conform to the beliefs and mores of those who run the religion. We would be better served if our religions could uncover, cultivate, and support our capacity for justice and kindness, rather than harp on our failures.

I am single, childless, and financially unsuccessful. How can I get comfortable with myself and learn to accept what’s happened to me in my life?

I would need to know so much more before answering your question directly, but I would offer two points: First, nothing happens to you. There is no you outside the happening. Things happen with you or maybe as you but not to you. Life is completely participatory. Saying that things happen to you implies that there is a you separate from the happening — a you who should be married, who should have kids, who should be successful — but this is only fantasy. There is just the you that is happening now. Second, to be comfortable with yourself, you have to know who the “me” is that needs to be comfortable. Are there two “yous,” one who is unmarried, without kids, and poor, and another who needs to be comfortable with this state of affairs? As long as you are split this way you will always be uncomfortable, even if you marry, have children, and become wealthy. To explore this further, I suggest you read Byron Katie’s book Loving What Is.

Spiritual practice often calls upon us to surrender the self, but people suffering from trauma or abuse need to build the self up, rather than tear it down. Is spirituality a danger to such people?

Spirituality is a process for discovering who you are and why you are here. Who you are is God: the singular divine Self manifesting as your unique self. Why you are here is to cultivate the self in such a way as to be a more effective vehicle of the Self and in this way, make your world more just, loving, meaningful, and holy. Authentic spirituality heals the traumatized self by opening it to the divine Self, and then releases the healed self to make the world more godly. There is no need to surrender or abandon the self, only the need to place it in its proper relationship with Self.

I believe I was a Jew with Moses in Sinai. Can I claim to be Jewish in this life?

Some Jews believe in a pintele Yid, a Jewish spark that gets trapped in a non-Jewish life. Honoring this spark means converting to Judaism. The last time you were a Jew, you wandered for 40 years in the wilderness. Don’t make the same mistake twice.

I have been reading your column and this magazine for several years, and I’m so blessed by what I read. I want to know if it’s all right to quote you.

No. We quote sources to support our own thinking. The sources are authorities. I’m not an authority. All I do is share my opinions. If you agree with me, then share with others what you believe is true. You don’t need me to back you up. If you don’t agree with me, why share what I say at all? Speak your truth, not mine.

I can forgive others but not myself. Why is this so? What can I do to forgive myself?

I won’t presume to know your specific situation, but in general, people who can forgive others but not themselves are often people who think way too much of and about themselves. Can it be that your failings are so much worse than those of others? Can it be that you, alone in all the world, are unforgivable? This smacks of narcissism. The issue may not be forgiving yourself but getting over yourself.

If this isn’t too personal, when you pray, what does God “look” like?

I make a distinction between prayer and meditation. Prayer engages the soul, that level of consciousness that maintains a sense of I/Thou as part of a greater whole. Meditation engages the spirit, pure I/I consciousness that cannot be turned into an object and thus cannot become an object of conversation. When I pray, I encounter God as Thou. For me, this Thou is the Divine Mother — Chochma/Sophia/Wisdom — that aspect of the divine that manifests in the world as the world. I speak with her daily, and feel blessed and humbled as she mirrors back to me the madness of my life, and encourages me to move beyond it. When I meditate, there are moments when “I” am gone. Of these moments of pure spirit I can say nothing. When they pass I find myself filled with compassion for and from all beings.

Source: Spirituality Health

God’s Blueprint: Scientific Evidence that the Earth was Created to Produce Humans by Christopher Knight

God’s Blueprint is the boldest statement yet by the popular investigator of the past, Christopher Knight. While he is sees a role for all religions he has none himself, yet Knight makes the case for a deliberate design to the human universe using detailed astronomical data. Surprisingly, most scientists already accept the basic notion of a God but because they require factual, checkable evidence, few have ever publicly supported the idea.

But now new evidence has became available that provides hard-nosed evidence of God’s existence. Nothing less than God’s blueprint appears to have been discovered – found accidentally by the author while researching the science of the Neolithic (late Stone Age) people of Western Europe. Knight makes his case in a step-by-step manner, making you the jury. The evidence will be sure to surprise and delight you. The only questions that remains is, will scientists embrace the concept of a Supreme Creator, as they once did in Isaac Newton’s day – and will theologians be prepared to look at new evidence that compliments their ancient scriptures?

Christopher Knight is one of the world’s leading researchers into freemasonry, sacred geometry and ancient astronomy. He is the co-author of many titles including, The Hiram Key, The Hiram Key Revisited, Solomon’s Power Brokers, Who Built The Moon?, Civilisation One and many more. He runs a marketing company in Yorkshire, and travels the world giving lectures. He is a frequent on-air contributor to documentaries that appear on cable TV in America, Canada, the UK and Europe. The author lives in UK.

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God’s Blueprint by Christopher Knight

Christopher Knight is the best-selling co-author of The Hiram Key, The Hiram Key Revisited, Solomon’s Power Brokers, Who Built The Moon?, Civilisation One and many more. Chris began his writing career by accident after he invested nearly twenty years in personal research into the origins of Freemasonic rituals and early Judaism. Whilst Chris has never had any religious affiliations of any kind he has always been interested in the formulation of belief systems. This book puts the idea of God on trial. Whilst the case has been hotly disputed over recent generations with scientists on one side and theologians on the other, evidence either way has been thin on the ground.

Richard Dawkins Interview – 19 June 2016

Richard Dawkins 2016 – Richard Dawkins in conversation with Penn Jillette at Live Talks LA

Bernardo Kastrup – Religion, Reality and The Meaning of Life: Part One


Published on Jun 18, 2016

Bernardo Kastrup discusses his book More Than Allegory – On Religious Myth, Truth, and Belief. View Here As a journey into the rabbit hole we call reality, its ultimate destination is a plausible, living validation of transcendence. It puts forward the controversial notion that many religious myths are actually true, argues that our own inner storytelling plays a surprising role in creating the seeming concreteness of things and the tangibility of history, and suggests, in the form of a myth, how deeply ingrained belief systems create the world we live in.

In a Universe seemingly devoid of meaning and purpose where matter is all that matters, our souls are at war with our intellects, and the consequences for life on Earth may yet prove disastrous. Maybe it is time for us to remember who we really are – both magician and audience, dreamer and dream, from a realm beyond language where time and space are illusions, and the very nature of truth itself may not be what it seems. We are the universe becoming aware of itself. We know what God cannot know.

http://www.bernardokastrup.com/

Many more interviews at http://www.legalise-freedom.com

Grounded: Finding God in the World-A Spiritual Revolution by Diana Butler Bass (Author)

The headlines are clear: religion is on the decline in America as many people leave behind traditional religious practices. Diana Butler Bass, leading commentator on religion, politics, and culture, follows up her acclaimed book Christianity After Religion by arguing that what appears to be a decline actually signals a major transformation in how people understand and experience God. The distant God of conventional religion has given way to a more intimate sense of the sacred that is with us in the world. This shift, from a vertical understanding of God to a God found on the horizons of nature and human community, is at the heart of a spiritual revolution that surrounds us – and that is challenging not only religious institutions but political and social ones as well.

Grounded explores this cultural turn as Bass unpacks how people are finding new spiritual ground by discovering and embracing God everywhere in the world around us—in the soil, the water, the sky, in our homes and neighborhoods, and in the global commons. Faith is no longer a matter of mountaintop experience or institutional practice; instead, people are connecting with God through the environment in which we live. Grounded guides readers through our contemporary spiritual habitat as it points out and pays attention to the ways in which people experience a God who animates creation and community.

Bass brings her understanding of the latest research and studies and her deep knowledge of history and theology to Grounded. She cites news, trends, data, and pop culture, weaves in spiritual texts and ancient traditions, and pulls it all together through stories of her own and others’ spiritual journeys. Grounded observes and reports a radical change in the way many people understand God and how they practice faith. In doing so, Bass invites readers to join this emerging spiritual revolution, find a revitalized expression of faith, and change the world.


Diana Butler Bass was born in Baltimore, Maryland and grew up in Scottsdale, Arizona. For as long as she can remember, she’s been interested in spirituality, religion, history, and politics–passions she intertwines in her books and writing. She holds a Ph.D. in American religious history from Duke University. After a dozen years teaching undergraduates, she became a full-time writer, independent researcher, educator, and consultant. Her work has been cited in the national media, including TIME Magazine, USA TODAY, and the Washington Post, and she has appeared on CNN, FOX, PBS, and on NPR. For five years, she wrote a weekly feature on American religion for the New York Times syndicate. She currently writes for Huffington Post and Washington Post and is a contributing editor at Sojourners magazine.

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The Sunday Forum: “Grounded” Finding God in the World – A Spiritual Revolution

Grounded: Finding God in the World – A Spiritual Revolution
Join author and scholar Diana Butler Bass as she discusses her newest book, Grounded: Finding God in the World – A Spiritual Revolution. Recent studies show many people leaving behind traditional religious practices. Diana Butler Bass, a leading commentator on religion, politics, and culture, argues that what appears to be a decline actually signals a major transformation in how people understand and experience God. The distant God of conventional religion has given way to a more intimate sense of the sacred that is with us in the world. This shift, from a vertical understanding of God to a God found on the horizons of nature and human community, is at the heart of a spiritual revolution that surrounds us—and that is challenging not only religious institutions but political and social ones as well.
Diana Butler Bass specializes in American religion and culture. She holds a Ph.D. in religious studies from Duke University and is the author of nine books. Bass will be the preacher at the 11:15 am worship service following the Sunday Forum

Matthew Wright – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

The Rev. Matthew Wright is an Episcopal priest, writer, and retreat leader working to renew the Christian Wisdom tradition within a wider interspiritual framework. He writes a monthly column, Belonging, for Contemplative Journal and serves as priest-in-charge at St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church in Woodstock, NY. Matthew lives with his wife, Yanick, alongside the brothers of Holy Cross Monastery in West Park, NY. You can learn more about his work through the Center for Spiritual Resources.

Huston Smith: Wisdomkeeper: Living The World’s Religions: The Authorized Biography of a 21st Century Spiritual by Dana Sawyer (Author)

Huston Smith is recognized and revered as the preeminent teacher of world religions while being a prolific author and scholar. His bestselling The World’s Religions, sold more than two million copies and is still the most popular introduction to comparative religion. Huston Smith followed a lifelong spiritual quest that led him around the world many times.

He studied the world’s religions and mystical traditions directly with Aldous Huxley, D. T. Suzuki, J. Krishnamurti, Alan Watts, Paul Tillich, Reinhold Niebuhr, the Dalai Lama, Joseph Campbell, Ram Dass, and a host of others. Huston, as a renowned philosopher of religion, taught at Washington University, M.I.T., Syracuse University, and the University of California–Berkeley, and during his career helped shape the contemporary face of comparative religion, interfaith dialogue, and religious tolerance. As a seeker, he became a citizen of the world, plunging into its various spiritual traditions. His many insights and adventures fill this compelling and edifying book, the authorized biography of a 21st-century spiritual giant.

Dana Sawyer is a professor of religion and philosophy at the Maine College of Art and a lecturer on world religions for the Chaplaincy Institute of Maine. He is the author of a critically acclaimed biography of Aldous Huxley. He lives in Portland, Maine.

Dana Sawyer – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Dana Sawyer was born in Jonesport, Maine in 1951. Currently he is a full-time professor of religion and philosophy at the Maine College of Art and an adjunct professor of Asian religions at the Bangor Theological Seminary. He is the author of numerous published papers and books, including Aldous Huxley: A Biography, which Laura Huxley described as, “Out of all the biographies written about Aldous, this is the only one he would have actually liked.”

Sawyer has been involved in fund-raising activities for the Siddhartha School Project in Stak, Ladakh, north India, for more than ten years and is currently vice-president of the Board of Trustees. This project has resulted in the construction of an elementary/ middle school for underprivileged Buddhist children that has been visited twice by the Dalai Lama, who holds it as a model for blending traditional and Western educational ideals. Much of his work for this project has involved translating at lectures for (and teaching with) the school’s founder, Geshe Lobzang Tsetan, who is currently the abbot of the Panchen Lama’s monastery in Mysore, India.

Sawyer’s interest in the phenomenon of Neo-Hindu and Buddhist groups in America led him to become a popular lecturer on topics of interest to these groups. He has taught at the Kripalu Center (Lenox, MA), the Barre Center for Buddhist Studies (Barre, MA), the Vedanta Society of Southern California (Hollywood, CA), the Esalen Institute in Big Sur, California, and other such venues. This work has also brought him into contact with several interesting and important figures in this field, including Stanislav Grof, Andrew Harvey, Huston Smith, Laura Huxley, Stephen Cope, and Alex Grey.

Sawyer has been to India eleven times, most recently while on sabbatical during the winter and spring of 2005, and has traveled extensively throughout the subcontinent: Nepal, Pakistan, Sikkim, Thailand, Cambodia, Hong Kong, and Japan.

Related to academic work Sawyer has lectured at the Kyoto University of Foreign Studies, Banaras Hindu University, the University of Riga, Latvia, the Huntington Library, and at colleges and conferences throughout the United States (interview footage of Sawyer from the Riga conference was featured in a British documentary, “Brand New World,” on the dangers of consumer culture). In August, 2005, Sawyer was a participant in the by-invitation-only conference on “Government, Education, and Religion” at the Oxford Roundtable, Lincoln College, Oxford University. He is a member of two academic societies: the Society for Asian and Comparative Philosophy (SACP) and the International Aldous Huxley Society, centered at the University of Munster in Germany.

Current Project: Sawyer is working closely with Huston Smith, noted scholar and author of The World’s Religions, to write his authorized biography.

More Than Allegory: On Religious Myth, Truth And Belief by Bernardo Kastrup (Author)

This book is a three-part journey into the rabbit hole we call the nature of reality. Its ultimate destination is a plausible, living validation of transcendence. Each of its three parts is like a turn of a spiral, exploring recurring ideas through the prisms of religious myth, truth and belief, respectively. With each turn, the book seeks to convey a more nuanced and complete understanding of the many facets of transcendence.

Part I puts forward the controversial notion that many religious myths are actually true; and not just allegorically so. Part II argues that our own inner storytelling plays a surprising role in creating the seeming concreteness of things and the tangibility of history. Part III suggests, in the form of a myth, how deeply ingrained belief systems create the world we live in. The three themes, myth, truth and belief, flow into and interpenetrate each other throughout the book.


Bernardo Kastrup has a Ph.D. in computer engineering with specializations in artificial intelligence and reconfigurable computing. He has worked as a scientist in some of the world’s foremost research laboratories, including the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the Philips Research Laboratories (where the “Casimir Effect” of Quantum Field Theory was discovered). Bernardo has authored many scientific papers and philosophy books. His three most recent books are: More Than Allegory, Brief Peeks Beyond and Why Materialism Is Baloney. He has also been an entrepreneur and founder of a successful high-tech start-up. Next to a managerial position in the high-tech industry, Bernardo maintains a philosophy blog, a video interview series, and continues to develop his ideas about the nature of reality. He has lived and worked in four different countries across continents, currently residing in the Netherlands.

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Religion, reason, time and space: introducing More Than Allegory

Published on Feb 24, 2016

This video introduces and discusses my new book ‘More Than Allegory: On religious myth, truth and belief.‘ It argues that religious mythology is an extraordinary psychosocial phenomenon that cannot be simply dismissed under the label of delusion. Its appeal throughout the ages arises from the fact that religious myths do convey truth, but truth that is neither literal nor merely allegorical. Religious myths embody, instead, a transcendent form of truth that cannot be captured in conceptual schemas or language narratives. The video also discusses the three key roles religious myths can, and must, play in contemporary society. Finally, it touches on the delicate challenge — addressed head-on in the book — of hinting at a worldview according to which time and space are constructs generated by the intellect, having no autonomous reality of their own. This is a challenge I have carefully avoided in my earlier five books, but whose time has now come.

Between Pain and Grace: A Biblical Theology of Suffering by Gerald W. Peterman (Author), Andrew J. Schmutzer (Author)



Why does suffering exist? When will it end? Where is God in it?

Despite how common suffering is, we still struggle to understand it, and even more, to bear through it. Between Pain and Grace gets to the heart of this struggle. Born from a popular college course on suffering, this book answers many of our critical questions, like:

  • Is God personally involved in our pain and suffering?
  • How should Christians handle emotions like grief and anger?
  • What does the Bible say about issues like mental illness, sexual abuse, and betrayal?

Striking an elegant balance between being scholarly on the one hand and heartfelt on the other, Between Pain and Grace is useful both in the classroom and for personal reading. The authors pull together Scripture, personal experiences, and even psychological research to offer a well-rounded and trustworthy take on suffering.

Between Pain and Grace will give you confidence in God’s sovereignty, comfort in His presence, and wisdom for life this side of paradise.

GERALD PETERMAN is Professor of Bible and Director of the Master of Arts, Biblical and Theological Studies at Moody Bible Institute. Before coming to Moody he taught at Palm Beach Atlantic College in West Palm Beach, FL, spent 4 1/2 years doing church planting for the Evangelical Free Church in central Florida and in south central Iowa, and also served eight years in the Air National Guard as a Chaplain. Peterman also serves part-time at his local church. For Moody Publishers he has written Joy and Tears: The Emotional Life of the Christian (2013) and is currently co-authoring Between Pain and Grace: A Biblical Theology of Suffering with Dr. Andrew Schmutzer. Research interests include New Testament Greek Language and Exegesis, Greek and Roman Background to the New Testament, and Biblical Theology. Gerald has been married to Marjory L. Peterman since January 1984, with two adult daughters, Bethany and Grace.



ANDREW SCHMUTZER (PhD
, Trinity International University) is Professor of Biblical Studies at Moody Bible Institute (Chicago, Illinois). In addition to numerous articles and essays on the Old Testament, he has written the exegetical theology Be Fruitful and Multiply and two forthcoming commentaries on Ruth and Esther.

The “God” Part of the Brain: A Scientific Interpretation of Human Spirituality and God by Matthew Alper (Author)

From the dawn of our species, every culture has maintained a belief in some form of a spiritual reality. Wouldn’t this imply that human spirituality must represent an inherent characteristic of our species, that is, a genetically inherited trait? Are Humans “wired” to believe in the universal concepts of a god, a soul, and an afterlife? Are what we call spiritual/religious experiences strictly physiological in nature, the effects of our brain’s chemistry? Does God really exist “out there,” beyond and ondependent of us? Or is God merely the product of an inherited human perception, the manifestation of an evolutionary adaptation – a coping mechanism – one that emerged in our species to enable us to survive our unique and otherwise debilitating awareness of death?


Ever since he was a child—when he first realized he was one day going to die—Matthew Alper set himself upon a life journey—a spiritual quest, if you will—to ascertain whether or not there exists a spiritual reality, a God. Was he merely a flesh and bone mortal or something more, something that perhaps transcended his purely physical self? After receiving a BA in Philosophy, Matthew continued his unconventional journey working as everything from a photographer’s assistant in NYC, an electrician in England, a 5th grade and High School history teacher in the projects of Brooklyn, a truck smuggler in Central Africa, a [produced] screenwriter in Germany—all the while independently studying the breadth of science from genetics, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, cultural anthropology, sociobiology and more.

Once his research yielded what he felt constituted a scientific explanation of spirituality and God, he returned to NYC where he wrote what he considers his life’s work, “The ‘God’ Part of the Brain.” Since its initial publication in 1996, Matthew has lectured all over the United States, appeared on NBC tv, been written up in the Washington Post, appeared on numerous radio shows and is a contributor to the anthology “Neurotheology,” an emergent new science of which he is considered one of its founders. He is an outspoken member of both the atheist and secular humanist movements. He presently lives in Park Slope, Brooklyn with his cat, Sucio.

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Art Bell & Alper: The God Part of The Brain

Art Bell interviews Matthew Alper, author of The God Part of The Brain.
Matthew Alper: http://www.godpart.com/

As we became consciously aware of ourselves and our surroundings, life. We also became aware of death, and how fragile life can be. So in order for our brains to be able to cope as consciously aware, it developed an area in the temporal lobes, that gives everyone born (unless they have a brain defect) a sense of a spirit/soul, god, part of whole, an afterlife, a continuation somehow….and so on. This area in the brain responsible for these beliefs is key to our survival as a species. We probably wouldn’t have made it this far without it. It helps to remove the fear of death so that we are able to take risk without to much of a fear of dying. This area in the brain also helps us to not be over stricken with grief from the loss of a loved one, to the point of being unable to function/survive. So all people have these beliefs for the very same reason “all cats meow”, our brain developed/evolved that way for survival reasons. This is why every culture has words for a soul, god, and so forth. Having the beliefs is perfectly normal, in fact it’s abnormal not to have them. A disbelief is something that one must learn. Which is usually done after childhood using logic and critical thinking skills. So blaming or attacking someone for having the core beliefs, is equal to attacking someone for being born with two hands. When in fact it’s perfectly normal.
By focusing electromagnetic waves on the temporal lobes, this causes one to feel the presence of God, and or see God, often other spirits as well. It causes a type of mystical religious experience.-Tommy Decentralized

God in the Brain,- Atheist Vs Spirituality

Matthew Alper:
website http://www.godpart.com/

Matthew Alper was born and raised in New York City. He was educated at Vasser and North London University where he acquired a degree in Philosophy of Science. After teaching High School History, Matthew went on to become a screenwriter and then to write to his seminal work “The God Part of the Brain,” now in its 5th edition. Since then Matthew has lectured at various universities on the topics of Cognitive Science and philosophy. He has been written up in the Washington Post and appeared on NBC.
LINKS:

Neurotheology
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neurothe…

Neurotheology: This Is You Brain On Religion
http://www.npr.org/2010/12/15/1320782…

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