Mooji – 2nd Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview


Advaita Zen master Mooji is unlike anyone else you are likely to meet, for he compels one to question one’s very nature and existence. From the very first encounter, people from all walks of life are deeply touched by his indefinable presence, and perhaps for the very first time experience a natural sense of happiness and peace as they come to discover who or what they truly are. Mooji (Anthony Paul Moo-Young) was born in Jamaica on January 29, 1954.

As a teenager, he moved to London, UK, where he later worked as a street portrait artist and then as an art teacher in the local college. In 1987, an encounter with a Christian mystic inspired Mooji to ‘walk out of his life’—an expression he uses to convey the profundity of that meeting. In 1993, Mooji traveled to India, where seemingly by chance, he met his Master, Sri HWL Poonja, or Papaji, as he is affectionately known by his devotees. At Papaji’s feet, whatever still remained of an active ego was finally uprooted.

Recognizing Mooji’s radiance, people from various parts of the world soon began to approach him to simply sit in his presence and to ask questions regarding their search for Truth. The capacity to guide them arose spontaneously in him. While Mooji’s presence exudes compassion and devotion, his unity with Truth is also potently shared through self-inquiry—the unsparing light of wisdom which dispels the delusions and suffering common to human experiencing. In his direct and open interactions, each one who meets Mooji with a genuine urge for freedom is pulled by his profound unconditional love and the power of his pointings into the recognition of the infinite Self we already are.

Mooji presently resides at Monte Sahaja in Portugal and he continues to share Satsang worldwide with all who yearn to discover their true nature. Website: http://mooji.org Books: Vaster Than Sky, Greater Than Space: What You Are Before You Became White Fire: Spiritual Insights and Teachings of Advaita Zen Master Mooji The Mala of God Writing on Water Before I Am, Second Edition Breath Of The Absolute – Dialogues With Mooji Interview recorded August 27, 2017.

MAHARISHI speak about the life of GURU DEV in the Ashram of his MASTER. Audio 1961.


Maharishi speak about the life of Guru Dev Swami Brahmananda Saraswati in the Ashram Of his Master Swami Krishnananda Saraswati. Audio 1961. Guru Purnima.

Pope Francis’ Encyclical: Hearing the Cry of the Earth

By Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

The Earth “now cries out to us because of the harm we have inflicted on her.” So begins Pope Francis in his powerful and long-awaited encyclical on ecology. “The earth herself, burdened and laid waste, is among the most abandoned and maltreated of our poor.”

Pope Francis chose to be called after a saint for whom love for all of God’s creation was central to his life, and all creatures were his brothers and sisters. Speaking in the voice of this saint “who loved and protects creation,” he calls for a moral response to prevent the “unprecedented destruction of the ecosystem,”–that we urgently need to recognize the consequences of, and changes required in our way of life. He reflects on our abuse, the violence creating “the symptoms of illness that we see in the Earth, the water, the air and in living things.” And describing how climate change most adversely affects the poor, he combines ecological and social justice, that we “hear both the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.”

The state of the Earth is our most pressing concern. Our present ecological crisis is the greatest man-made disaster this planet has ever faced: the signs of global imbalance, climate change, and species depletion are all around us. The monster of materialism is ravaging the Earth, its rapacious greed destroying the ecosystem, the fragile web of life that supports and nourishes all of life’s myriad creatures. We are part of a world of wonder and beauty which we are systematically sacrificing to feed our ever-increasing desires. We need to remember the simple wonder of the natural world around us, which St. Francis celebrated in his beautiful Canticle of Brother Sun:

Praised be You, my Lord, through Sister Mother Earth,
who sustains us and governs us and who produces
varied fruits with colored flowers and herbs.

Yesterday, when I went to my small vegetable patch to pick a few zucchinis for supper, I was once again amazed at the Earth’s generosity, how one plant could give so many vegetables. I had to look carefully under the spreading leaves to discover a zucchini unexpectedly growing almost too large. This is the sacred life that sustains us, part of the creation we desperately need to “love and protect,” just as it loves and protects us.

A central but rarely addressed aspect of this crisis is our forgetfulness of the sacred nature of creation, and how this affects our relationship to the environment. Pope Francis speaks of the pressing need to articulate a spiritual response to this ecological crisis and to “feel intimately united with all that exists.” Today’s world is dominated by a divisiveness that encourages exploitation and greed, and we need to return to a sense of wholeness, reflecting the living unity of all of creation and its myriad inhabitants.

The Earth needs both physical and spiritual attention and awareness, our acts and prayers, our hands and hearts. Life is a self-sustaining organic whole of which we are a part, and once we reconnect with this whole we can find a different way to live–one that is not based upon a need for continual distraction and the illusions of material fulfillment, but rather a way to live that is sustaining for the whole.

Each in our own way we can turn away from the patterns of consumerism that drain our money and our life energy. We can aspire to live a simpler life, learning how to live in a more sustainable way, and not be drawn into unnecessary materialism–filling our life with love and care rather than “stuff.” A simple meal of vegetables and grains cooked with love and attention can nourish our body and soul.

But, to speak more with the voice of St. Francis, the Earth also needs our prayers, our spiritual attention. Many of us know the effectiveness of prayers for others, how healing and help is given, even in the most unexpected ways. It can be helpful first to acknowledge that the Earth is not “unfeeling matter,” but a living being that has given us life. And then we can “hear its cry,” sense its suffering: the physical suffering we see in the dying species and polluted waters–the deeper suffering of our collective disregard for its sacred nature.

Pope Francis ends his encyclical with two prayers for our Earth. There is also the simple prayer of placing the world as a living being within our hearts when we inwardly offer our self to the Divine. In this prayer we remember the sorrow and suffering of the Earth in our hearts, and ask that that the world be remembered, that divine love and mercy flow where it is needed; that even though we continue to treat the world so badly, divine grace will help us and help the world–help to bring the Earth back into balance. We need to remember that the power of the Divine is more than that of all the global corporations that continue to make the world a wasteland, even more than the global forces of consumerism that demand the life-blood of the planet. We pray that the Divine of which we are all a part can redeem and heal this beautiful and suffering world.

Sometimes it is easier to pray when we feel the earth in our hands, when we work in the garden tending our flowers or vegetables. Or when we cook, preparing the vegetables that the Earth has given us, mixing in the herbs and spices that give us pleasure. There are many ways to pray, and we will each find our own way of tending the Earth within our own hearts. Just as the song of St. Francis calls us to praise the Earth, and to praise God “through all your creatures.”

As Pope Francis’s message reminds us, we each need to be the person who “loves and protects creation,” who remembers its sacred nature. We need to bring this song of love into our hearts and hands. Through our love for the Earth we can honor the call to climate action that comes from all faiths and from the single voice that is within all of humanity. We are all part of one living being we call the Earth and it desperately needs our love and attention.

Pope Francis urges people to combat climate change

Published on Jun 18, 2015

Carl Apple of the Catholic Diocese of Grand Rapids talks about Pope Francis’ recent stance on climate change. (June 18, 2015)

3. Nature Is Speaking – Penélope Cruz is Water 4. Nature Is Speaking – Kevin Spacey is The Rainforest 5.Nature Is Speaking – Lupita Nyong’o is Flower

Nature Is Speaking – Penélope Cruz is Water

Nature Is Speaking – Kevin Spacey is The Rainforest

Nature Is Speaking – Lupita Nyong’o is Flower | Conservation International (CI)

1. Nature Is Speaking – Julia Roberts is Mother Nature 2. Nature Is Speaking – Harrison Ford is The Ocean


Published on Oct 5, 2014
Julia Roberts, Harrison Ford, Kevin Spacey, Edward Norton, Penélope Cruz, Robert Redford and Ian Somerhalder all join forces to give nature a voice.
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Nature Is Speaking – Harrison Ford is The Ocean | Conservation International (CI)

Your Redefining Moments: Becoming Who You Were Born to Be by Dennis Merritt Jones


Who does your soul ask you to be? In Your ReDefining Moments, Dennis Merritt Jones provides an exciting road map back to our center, where we will find our Authentic Self.

It can seem like every person, every television show, and every ad has an idea of who we are supposed to be. But who does your soul ask you to be? In Your ReDefining Moments , spiritual teacher Dennis Merritt Jones offers a road map back to your center, where you will find your Authentic Self. It is from that center, Merritt Jones shows, that you can live the life you were born for, rather than the tug-of-war so many people get caught up in, trying to be all things to all people, trying to be anyone but who they truly are.

In Your ReDefining Moments , you will discover the Seven Intrinsic Qualities of the Authentic Self:

1. Wholeness
2. Reverence
3. Fearlessness
4. Integrity
5. Non-attachment
6. Non-judgment
7. Unconditional Love

Being who you are matters; the gift of your Authentic Self is the gift you have come to share with the world.
Dennis Merritt Jones has been involved in the human potential movement and the field of spirituality for the majority of his life as a teacher, author and keynote speaker. His most recent award winning book is “The Art of Uncertainty ~ How to Live in the Mystery of Life and Love It.” Jones is also the award winning author of “The Art of Being ~ 101 Ways to Practice Purpose in Your Life” and “How to Speak Science of Mind.” Dennis writes a free weekly MindfulPurpose E-Message available through his website, http://www.DennisMerrittJones.com, and is a regular columnist for the Huffington Post

Dennis Merritt Jones: The Art of Uncertainty

Reverence: Renewing a Forgotten Virtue by Paul Woodruff

Reverence is an ancient virtue dating back thousands of years. It survives among us in half-forgotten patterns of behavior and in the vestiges of old ceremonies. Yet, Paul Woodruff says, we have lost sight of reverence. This short, elegiac volume makes an impassioned case for the fundamental importance of the forgotten virtue of reverence, and how awe for things greater than oneself can—indeed must—be a touchstone for other virtues like respect, humility, and charity. Ranging widely over diverse cultural terrain—from Philip Larkin to ancient Greek poetry, from modern politics to Chinese philosophy—Woodruff shows how absolutely essential reverence is to a well-functioning society. He tackles some thorny questions: How does reverence allow not only for leaders but for followers? What role does reverence play in religion? Do some religions misuse reverence? Must reverence be humorless? In the process, Woodruff shows convincingly how reverence plays an unseen part in virtually every human relationship. Elegantly written, thoughtful yet urgent, Reverence is sure to reach out to a wide variety of people interested in the moral health of Western culture, showing how our own intellectual and spiritual legacy can guide us more than we realize.


Paul Woodruff is Mary Helen Thompson Professor of the Humanities at the University of Texas in Austin. A widely published translator of Plato, Thucydides, and other ancient writers, he has written extensively on classical philosophy and political thought.

Click here to take a look inside.

View the interview with PBS’s Bill Moyers HERE

Including the Earth in Our Prayers by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Every morning I love to walk early beside the wetlands where I live. It is a time of natural reflection and prayer, a time to be alone with nature and the divine that is present: in the hawk sitting on the telephone lines, the skyline softening and turning golden. And now, as we move towards the winter solstice, the first light comes later, and the darkness seems more potent. In this natural time of darkening my prayer instinctively deepens, as if in response to the loss of light. I sense the energy withdrawing into the earth, and today, the first hard frost, white and brittle, drew me even more towards an inner light.

In my prayer I wonder how it is for the Earth itself, at this time of another darkening, when our materialistic consumer culture depletes so much of the land. We have all heard the news of climate change, pollution, and species extinction. We have seen the pictures of smog-filled streets and clear-cut forests. But how do we sense this in our hearts? Do we dare to acknowledge and feel the wasteland we have created? Do we feel the grief of a world that is dying through our greed and desires? Do we pray for the Earth as we would a sick friend, a cancer sufferer, a dying partner?

More and more we are being reminded that we are not separate from the Earth and its ecosystem—we are all living together, dependent upon each other and our shared environment. As Thich Nhat Hanh writes: “We will survive and thrive together with our Mother Earth or we will not survive at all.”

We are a part of the Earth and it is through her great generosity that we are nurtured and nourished, eating her food, drinking her waters, clothed in her fabric. Even as we deplete her, she continues to give and give. Her generosity is a lesson for us all. Each morning on my walk I pass a gnarled old apple tree. I watch her boughs become heavy with fruit, slowly reddening as late summer turns to fall. I marvel at how she gives with such abundance without wanting anything in return. Now, in this “season of giving,” if we can remember the constant stream of gifts we receive from her, and be appreciative in our hearts.

As I get older I feel the Earth’s endless generosity more and more, as if I treasure each season in the year and its different offerings, its changing fruits. I know more clearly how I would not be here without this giving. At the same time my heart hurts for the Earth, grieves at the way our culture treats her wonder and gifts, her magic and sacred meaning. And the question arises from my depths, in a culture of seeming abundance how have we lost so much?

So during this natural season of darkening my heart responds to an unnatural darkening. My prayers turn towards a sacred world we seem to have forgotten. This prayer sometimes feels as if the Earth itself were crying through me, imploring us to remember it at this time of need. Maybe in this darkening something can be born, a new way of being that respects all of life, that sustains the whole of creation. Maybe once again we can remember our love for the Earth, our reverence for what is sacred within all of creation, and honor all of its inhabitants. Then our hearts can open and sense the divine that is all around us—our prayers turn into praise. Once again we can live in an ensouled world that nourishes us everyday with sacred meaning.

We are part of a magical, beautiful, and suffering Earth, whose darkening we have created with our endless exploitation. The Earth, which is so infinitely generous, needs our prayers, needs our loving, our open hearts and remembrance. Each morning as I walk in the first light I feel this need, and the response that comes from the depths of my soul: in this time of winter solstice may we include the Earth in our prayers.
We Are Part of a Living Whole – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

An awareness of the inner worlds is an essential part of our human heritage—those worlds that are invisible to our physical sight, but exist in other dimensions of reality. However, this awareness has been censored by rational consciousness and our present culture. This talk explores our need to reclaim our connection to these realities, to return to the greater wholeness to which we belong.

The Relationship Between the Inner & Outer Worlds – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

HumaniTrees: Exploring Human Nature through the Spirit of Trees by Joan Klostermann-Ketels

Come take a walk and watch the woods spring to life!

Much more than a simple botanical text or field guide, HumaniTrees takes us on a walk through the forest to explore aspects of our own human nature. Using striking photographs of trees that represent these qualities, paired with inspirational quotes, this book encourages us to contemplate the relationship between our humanity, Mother Nature, and to something greater than ourselves. A handy discussion guide is included that provides an interpretive starting point for classrooms, book clubs, nature walks, or family outings.

Humani Trees is ideal as:
* a coffee table book for any place with a waiting room
* a gift for any occasion (Holidays, birthdays, anniversaries, weddings, thank you, etc.)
* an inspirational book for parents and educators who want to teach about the power of observation
* a family “staycation” book to take the kids on a tree spirit walk of their own
* a bedside table book to dip into and get inspired

Joan Klostermann-Ketels a partner in BeingOfSoundSpirit,™ which is dedicated to the health and well-being of the human spirit, and the author of PersonaliTrees. She also runs a corporate training firm, Ketels Contract Training. She lives in Eldora, Iowa.

Click here to view.

Spiritual Ecology : A Quiet Revolution ~ Leslie E. Sponsel

An internet search for “Spiritual Ecology” and related terms like “Religion and Nature” and “Religion and Ecology” reveals tens of millions of websites. Spiritual Ecology: A Quiet Revolution offers an intellectual history of this far-reaching movement. Arranged chronologically, it samples major developments in the thoughts and actions of both historic and contemporary pioneers, ranging from the Buddha and St. Francis of Assisi to Wangari Maathai’s Green Belt Movement and James Cameron’s 2010 epic film Avatar.

This foundational book is unique in that it provides a historical, cross-cultural context for understanding and advancing the ongoing spiritual ecology revolution, considering indigenous and Asian religious traditions as well as Western ones. Most chapters focus on a single pioneer, illuminating historical context and his/her legacy, while also connecting that legacy to broader concerns. Coverage includes topics as diverse as Henry David Thoreau and the Green Patriarch Bartholomew’s decades-long promotion of environmentalism as a sacred duty for more than 250 million members of the Orthodox Church worldwide. For more information, visit http://www.spiritualecology.info.

Sacred banyon tree and spirit house in Bangkok, Thailand.


Leslie E. Sponsel earned the BA in Geology from Indiana University (1965), and the MA (1973) and PhD (1981) in Biological and Cultural Anthropology from Cornell University. Over the last four decades he has taught at seven universities in four countries, two as a Fulbright Fellow. In 1981 he was hired to develop and direct the Ecological Anthropology Program at the University of Hawai`i. His courses include Ecological Anthropology, Environmental Anthropology, Anthropology of Religion, Spiritual Ecology, Sacred Places, Anthropology of Buddhism, Ethics in Anthropology, and Anthropology of War and Peace. Although retired since August 2010, usually he still teaches one course each semester and then devotes the rest of his time to research and publications.

From 1974 to 1981 Sponsel conducted several trips to the Venezuelan Amazon to study human ecology with the Yanomami and other indigenous societies. Almost yearly since 1986 Sponsel has made research trips to Thailand to study various aspects of Buddhist ecology and environmentalism together with his wife, Dr. Poranee Natadecha-Sponsel. In recent years their work in northern Thailand has focused on exploring sacred caves.

Among Sponsel’s extensive publications are more than two dozen journal articles, three dozen book chapters, 29 entries in seven different scientific encyclopedias, and two edited and two co-edited books, most peer-reviewed. Henceforth he will focus on publishing other books integrating his previous articles and chapters on several different subjects. Next up is the book Natural Wisdom: Exploring Buddhist Ecology and Environmentalism. He is developing the Research Institute for Spiritual Ecology (RISE) and its website as founding Director:
http://spiritualecology.info.

Click here to browse inside

Never Meeting Maharishi…Igor Kufayev

January 12th is Birthday of His Holiness Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. The day is celebrated by hundreds of thousands of meditators around the World. The Master is largely known for bringing Transcendental Meditation to householders and followers of different spiritual disciplines, as well as to schools and uni campuses.

Although there are quite few who have met and worked with Maharishi closely, most have never met the man who some consider to be greatest Teacher the World has known in our Time. His legacy has entered collective consciousness and it would take decades before it could be adequately assessed by historians, scholars and sociologists alike.

Yet this is a deeply intimate story.

Being introduced to TM in mid 90-s, when I was in my late twenties, meeting the Master was not that important. TM for me was just a tool to complement my already rich by then artistic life. Gradually though Maharishi’s presence grow, my curiosity was aroused and a seed of desire to meet the Master one day was firmly planted.

From around mid 90-s Maharishi was no longer available for general public appearances. The Guru has retreated in Holland and gave televised Darshans to a large international community, and on special occasions only. January 12th was one such occasion. Watching these gatherings I was secretly envious to those who had the privilege to meet and be next to the Master.

By the time my desire reached its zenith, it was practically impossible to meet Maharishi by someone who wasn’t even working for the movement. That time has coincided with transformative awakening while attending one of the advanced TM programs. It was then when I had my first intense encounter with the Guru on the level beyond the senses…

The power of Grace filled my heart with such intensity of Love for Maharishi that mere glimpse of his image was enough to send my whole being in throbs of Ecstasy often mixed with tears of Joy and Gratitude… Soon my dwelling became a place of worship. Hundreds of roses were sacrificed at the altar, embalming my heart with the perfume of devotion never known to me before…

While my heart was filled up to its brim, the idea of meeting the Guru still lingered in the mind… Encouraged by those who have known Maharishi since the 60-s I’ve written a letter to the Master where I’ve shared my experiences of higher states of Consciousness but mainly trying to express the gratitude with as much humility as my knowledge of English allowed me to.

The reply came on that level where postman himself is the messenger by divine appointment. It was revealed deep in a state of Samadhi… And from there on my Sadhana was guided not just by Maharishi but by his own Master, Guru Dev himself.

By that time desire to meet Maharishi reached its sublime height, what happened then is too subtle to give it to pen…

To put it plainly, the seeker has drowned in the Sea of seen, where all desires have found its perfect fulfillment including that most pertinent wish to meet the Guru. That meeting took place in the Heart. The Union was so complete that no further physical contact could have possibly altered serene plenitude of being One with the Beloved…

Looking back in retrospect, it was interesting to observe how that relationship undergone transformation. From placidity of impersonal, through intensely personal and ultimately to universal sense of Love for the Teacher.

For at the beginning there was this arrogance which didn’t allow any subtler forms to be perceived, only to grow into very personal affair with time. I couldn’t care less how many loved Maharishi, he was mine in every sense. That was deeply personal, individualized relationship.

Which was eventually and beautifully transformed into understanding that Maharishi belongs to every being.

Moreover, every being in his or her essential nature is that Great Seer – The Rishi who sees through the Heart of All.

I prostrate at the place where your feet touched the ground… Oh Divine Being who carried Light so Brightly that it Illumined the World within and without.

Jai Guru Dev



Igor Kufayev

The Seven Paths: Changing One’s Way of Walking in the World by Anasazi Foundation

Discover the Healing Power of the Wilderness

People have moved away from Mother Earth, bringing heartache, pain, and other maladies of the modern age. The “self-help” movement claims to offer peace and fulfillment to individuals, but this solitary approach takes us only so far. Ultimately, it is in communion with our fellow beings and the natural world that we are made whole. We need to leave the path of Me and follow the path of We.

This poetic, evocative story presents the meditations of an ancient Anasazi tribesman who rejects his family and sets off on a journey through the desert. He walks seven paths, each teaching a lesson symbolized by an element of the natural world: light, wind, water, stone, plants, animals, and, finally, the unity of all beings with the Creator. The Seven Paths reveals a source of wisdom, restoration, and renewal familiar to native people but lost to the rest of us, seven elements among nature that combine to mend human hearts.

Founded in 1988 by renowned wilderness pioneers Larry D. Olsen and Ezekiel C. Sanchez (Good Buffalo Eagle), ANASAZI Foundation gives young people an opportunity for growth through a primitive living experience and a philosophy that invites healing at the hands of nature.

Click and Listen: Play Sample

Read here
An Excerpt From The Seven Paths: Changing One’s Way of Walking in the World

The Seven Paths of the ANASAZI Way

Recognized internationally for its caring and effective approach, ANASAZI Foundation is a non-profit (501c3) intervention resource that helps to restore and strengthen parent-child relationships.

ANASAZI’s licensed and Joint Commission-accredited, outdoor behavioral healthcare services are ideal for adolescents (13-17) and young adults (18-25) struggling with lack of motivation, defiance, mild mood disorders, drug and alcohol experimentation, entitlement issues, and other self-defeating behaviors. ANASAZI’s offer a 42-day, wilderness-based, residential treatment program and outpatient services rooted in the belief that all young people—regardless of their struggles or at-risk choices—possess an inherent “seed of greatness.” This idea permeates ANASAZI’s philosophy and its evidence-based therapeutic approach, which addresses the biological, psychological, social, and spiritual aspects of a child’s life.

To learn more, please visit: http://www.anasazi.org

THE SEVEN PATHS – Book Trailer

Published on Aug 30, 2013

On August 6, 2013 the long awaited Seven Paths book was published. The book was written by The ANASAZI Foundation, published by Berrett-Koelher.
A lyrical, moving parable of the healing wisdom of the wilderness. The Seven Paths supplies what’s missing in traditional notions of self-help: the importance of a connection to a community and to the natural world in achieving inner peace/fulfillment.

Description
Too many people today have taken the wrong path. They walk alone, seeking peace and fulfillment in isolation. Countless well-meaning self-help books preach this gospel, as the name “self-help” implies. But this approach will take us only so far. Ultimately, it is in communion with our fellow beings and the natural world that we are made whole. We need to leave the path of Me and follow the path of We.

This poetic and evocative book, drawing on the personal experiences of Good Buffalo Eagle, presents the meditations of an ancient Native American who rejects his family and community and walks off into the desert. During his journey, he discovers the seven paths of the Anasazi way, each path teaching a lesson symbolized by an element of the natural world: light, wind, water, stone, plants, animals, and finally the unity of all beings with the Creator, the path of We. By walking these paths, he discovers the roots of his conflict and the way toward reconciliation.

For years, this book has been privately distributed by the Anasazi Foundation, an award-winning nonprofit organization whose work with troubled youth in a wilderness setting has been extraordinarily effective. But there is benefit here for all. The Seven Paths gives access to a source of wisdom and renewal familiar to native people but lost to the rest of us. As Good Buffalo Eagle writes in the foreword, this book “presents what might be described as a course in healing—seven elements among nature that combine to heal human hearts.”

The Seven Paths book release GoodBuffaloEagle speaks -2013

Living With Saints and Sages by Devadas T. Chelvam (Author)

Living with Saints and Sages is a bridge that connects spiritual masters from various religions or without any religion, focusing on their whole-hearted commitment to realize the true meaning of life. Clarifying the common confusions concerning religion, the book provides the reader with the clear concepts conducive to steady progress in the art of living. “The joy and love that pervades these individual narratives seem so natural and immediate that we can’t help feeling that this is how our Creator would wish to deal with each and every one of us . . . To read this book is to sense that God is offering us a ‘Romance with the Infinite'” -Dr. Quincy Howe, Professor of Classics and Religion

Devadas Chelvam studied at Union Theological Seminary in New York, Columbia University, and Fordham to earn master’s degrees in theology and sociology. Initially a Catholic priest in Sri Lanka and the United Sates, then an agnostic, and now he accepts that all the people are marching towards Truth, though their paths may differ widely.

Click here to browse inside

Living with Saints and Sages by Devadas Chelvam

Overview
Living with Saints and Sages is a bridge that connects spiritual masters from various religions or without any religion, focusing on their whole-hearted commitment to realize the true meaning of life.

Clarifying the common confusions concerning religion, the book provides the reader with the clear concepts conducive to steady progress in the art of living.
“The joy and love that pervades these individual narratives seem so natural and immediate that we can’t help feeling that this is how our Creator would wish to deal with each and every one of us … To read this book is to sense that God is offering us a ‘Romance with the Infinite'”
-Dr. Quincy Howe, Professor of Classics and Religion

Frank Strock’s Interview with the author of Living with Saints and Sages – Devdas Chelvam

The World Peace Diet: Eating For Spiritual Health And Social Harmony By Will Tuttle, Ph.D.

Food is our most intimate and telling connection both with the living natural order and with our living cultural heritage. By eating the plants and animals of our earth, we literally incorporate them. It is also through this act of eating that we partake of our culture’s values and paradigms at the most primal levels. It is becoming increasingly obvious, however, that the choices we make about our food are leading to environmental degradation, enormous human health problems, and unimaginable cruelty toward our fellow creatures.

Incorporating systems theory, teachings from mythology and religions, and the human sciences, The World Peace Diet presents the outlines of a more empowering understanding of our world, based on a comprehension of the far-reaching implications of our food choices and the worldview those choices reflect and mandate. The author offers a set of universal principles for all people of conscience, from any religious tradition, that they can follow to reconnect with what we are eating, what was required to get it on our plate, and what happens after it leaves our plates.

The World Peace Diet suggests how we as a species might move our consciousness forward so that we can be more free, more intelligent, more loving, and happier in the choices we make.

Will Tuttle has a master’s degree in humanities from San Francisco State University and a Ph.D. in the philosophy of education from the University of California. A professional pianist and teacher, he has for the last thirteen years toured progressive churches, vegetarian and macrobiotic conferences, and intentional communities throughout the country. He trained in Korea as a Zen Buddhist monk and has worked extensively in Tai Chi, yoga, massage, and dance and movement. He lives in Healdsburg, California.

Click here to browse inside.

The World Peace Diet

Uploaded on Jun 7, 2011

A presentation by Will Tuttle, Ph.D..

Dr. Will Tuttle will present the main ideas in his book, The World Peace Diet. It has been called one of the most important books of the 21st century: the foundation of a new society based on the truth of the interconnectedness of all life. It is the first book to make explicit the invisible connections between our meals and our broad range of problems psychological, social, and spiritual, as well as health and environmental. Dr. Tuttle offers powerful ways we can all experience healing and peace and contribute to a positive transformation of human consciousness.

Dr. Will Tuttle, acclaimed pianist, composer, educator, and author, has lectured and performed widely throughout North America and Europe. His doctorate degree from the University of California, Berkeley, focused on educating intuition in adults, and he has taught college courses in creativity, humanities, mythology, religion, and philosophy. He is a recipient of The Peace Abbey${q}s Courage of Conscience Award and is a Dharma Master in the Zen tradition. See worldpeacediet.org for more details.

Filming and editing by Dr William Harris M.D. on September 8, 2009 at Ala Wai Golf Course Clubhouse, Honolulu, Hawaii
Sponsored by: Vegetarian Society of Hawaii http://www.vsh.org

Avatar and Nature Spirituality ~ Bron Taylor

Released Date: July 2013


Avatar and Nature Spirituality explores the cultural and religious significance of James Cameron’s film Avatar (2010), one of the most commercially successful motion pictures of all time. Its success was due in no small measure to the beauty of the Pandora landscape and the dramatic, heart-wrenching plight of its nature-venerating inhabitants. To some audience members, the film was inspirational, leading them to express affinity with the film’s message of ecological interdependence and animistic spirituality. Some were moved to support the efforts of indigenous peoples, who were metaphorically and sympathetically depicted in the film, to protect their cultures and environments. To others, the film was politically, ethically, or spiritually dangerous. Indeed, the global reception to the film was intense, contested, and often confusing.

To illuminate the film and its reception, this book draws on an interdisciplinary team of scholars, experts in indigenous traditions, religious studies, anthropology, literature and film, and post-colonial studies. Readers will learn about the cultural and religious trends that gave rise to the film and the reasons these trends are feared, resisted, and criticized, enabling them to wrestle with their own views, not only about the film but about the controversy surrounding it. Like the film itself, Avatar and Nature Spirituality provides an opportunity for considering afresh the ongoing struggle to determine how we should live on our home planet, and what sorts of political, economic, and spiritual values and practices would best guide us.

Bron Taylor is a professor at the University of Florida and a fellow of the Rachel Carson Center in Munich, Germany. His books include Dark Green Religion: Nature Spirituality and the Planetary Future (2010), and he is the editor of the award-winning Encyclopedia of Religion and Nature (2005) and the Journal for the Study of Religion, Nature and Culture. His website is http://www.brontaylor.com.

Statement on Religion, Nature, Culture and Environmental Values

Ten Metaphysical Lessons from James Cameron’s Avatar: View HERE

CONTINUUM ~ OVERVIEW

 

 

Released 7th December 2012

At the end of 2011, we filmed a short documentary called OVERVIEW about astronauts’ experiences in space, due for release in the last quarter of 2012. The film is both a stand-alone short film and a prelude to CONTINUUM, introducing many of the key ideas expanded upon in the feature documentary.
SYNOPSIS

Astronauts who have seen the Earth from space have often described the ‘overview effect’ as an experience that has transformed their perspective of the planet and mankind’s place upon it, and enabled them to perceive it as our shared home, without boundaries between nations or species.

OVERVIEW is a short film that will explore this perspective through interviews with astronauts who have experienced the overview effect. The film also features insights from commentators and thinkers on the wider implications and importance of this understanding for humanity as a whole, and especially its relevance to how we meet the tremendous challenges facing our planet at this time.
FEATURING

• EDGAR MITCHELL – Apollo 14 astronaut and founder of the Institute of Noetic Sciences
• RON GARAN – ISS astronaut and founder of humanitarian organisation Fragile Oasis
• NICOLE STOTT – Shuttle and ISS astronaut and member of Fragile Oasis
• JEFF HOFFMAN – Shuttle astronaut and senior lecturer at MIT
• SHANE KIMBROUGH – Shuttle/ISS astronaut and Lieutenant Colonel in the US Army
• FRANK WHITE – space theorist and author of the book ‘The Overview Effect’
• DAVID LOY- philosopher and author
• DAVID BEAVER – philosopher and co-founder of The Overview Institute

Urgent Message from Mother by Jean Shinoda Bolen, M.D.

“Gather the women, save the world” is a message from Mother Earth, Mother Goddess, Mother archetype, delivered by author Jean Shinoda Bolen. The words evoke an intuitive recognition, a wisdom whose time has come. Women as a gender, not every woman but women generally, have a wisdom that is needed. This is a call from the Sacred Feminine to bring the feminine principle which most women and some men embody into consciousness and culture. When there is a critical mass and the tipping point is reached, gender balance ends patriarchy, and peace becomes possible.

In its original edition, this culmination of Jean Shinoda Bolen’s life’s work sold over 25,000 copies. Now in paperback for the first time Urgent Message from Mother is a call to action for all the women of the world. This unique combination of visionary thinking and practical how-to seeks to galvanize the power of women acting together in order to save our world. Bolen outlines the lessons we can learn from the women’s movement, draws on Jungian psychology and the sacred feminine, and gives powerful examples of women coming together all over the globe and making a significant impact.

Click Here To Listen to Jean Shinoda Bolen talking on a phone line about Urgent Message from Mother: Gather the Women, Save the World. (13 min. 54 sec.)

Click Here To Browse Inside

Urgent Message from Mother:
Interview with Jean Shinoda Bolen
By James Conti

Jean Bolen, MD, is the acclaimed author of nine previous books, including The Millionth Circle and Crones Don’t Whine. An internationally renowned Jungian analyst, she is a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at UCSF . Join Jean Shinoda Bolen, MD, at East West Books in Mountain View.

There is no mincing of words in Jean Bolen’s newest book Urgent Message from Mother. Her subtitle gives us the message itself: Gather the Women, Save the World. American women, Jean notes, have twice changed their world, thereby effecting major change in the world as a whole. The women’s suffrage movement in the early 20th century led to political equality, and the feminist movement launched in the 1960s has brought about a significant shift in the personal, social and economic status of women. Jean now sees a third women’s movement emerging, whose agenda is clear, crucial and unequivocal: to save our planet from the patriarchal power games that have set us on a path of disaster. Wherever there is conflict, she writes, a commitment to cooperation must prevail. Gather the women.

James Conti: Jean, you have written in no uncertain terms that the world needs Mother—the Sacred Feminine—to set things right, because so much is out of balance.

Jean Bolen: Yes. As Bishop Desmond Tutu has said, men have been running the world and have pretty much made a mess of it. Basically it’s the compassion element that’s been missing. It’s really time for the feminine principle now, for connected reconciliation and forgiveness.

The goddess has been a primary theme in your work, and now in this book you’ve added an accelerated activism to it. The word'”urgent” in the title speaks volumes in itself. Living as we do in the shadow of potential self-destruction, is this new women’s movement a case of now or never?

Well, I think so. I think there’s about a 20-year window of opportunity for change. When the United States and the Soviet Union called off the nuclear arms race, it felt as if the danger of destroying the planet was over, and now it’s like it’s metastasized. So, there’s that on one hand. On the other hand there’s a generation of women who have never existed in history before. It’s the most empowered generation of women ever. These women are getting together in groups and really accomplishing things. These groups, or circles, have the potential to reach critical mass. Maybe that will be at the millionth circle. It’s what Malcolm Gladwell calls “the tipping point.” When a tipping point happens in a culture, the culture changes.

Your book cites a number of stories of courage and cooperation that demonstrate the power of your millionth circle idea. Please say more about the concept.

When it comes to changing the world, conventional wisdom says, “Who do you think you are?” But if you do your part, no matter what circle you belong to, there is movement towards critical mass. Gladwell’s notion of a tipping point comes out of epidemiology. It explains how a latent virus like AIDS can progress geometrically until it reaches epidemic proportions. An idea can spread in the same way. Circles of people who support an idea give birth to more circles. The millionth circle.

I was struck by your observation of a deeply rooted difference between men and women. In stressful situations, men have been conditioned to “fight or flee,” whereas women are inclined to “tend and befriend.” This is quite revealing of the world’s current state, isn’t it?

Yes. It is women’s way to take care of people. That’s the kind of energy that is needed whenever there is conflict. When we look at the really troubled spots in the world, there aren’t women involved in the negotiations. In Northern Ireland, it was the presence of women and their involvement that brought about the Belfast Accord. In South Africa too, the old way was conflict retaliation instead of resolution. It took really good men like Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu to unite the country. Compassion and connection grew out of who they are.

Jean, you end your book with a discussion guide, and in it you ask a number of compelling questions. Are you hopeful that we will answer them with a commitment to action?

I have an optimistic sense that both men and women have reached a point of feeling that something really has to change. This is a book for everyone, but mainly I think there are two groups of women who will hear and heed the message. One is the young activist women who get it. They’re not buying into consumerism. They want to do something to make a difference, and they’ve got the energy to do it. The other is my age group. There are something like 50 million women in the U.S. who are over 50 now, a huge number of whom have a real sense of gratitude for what the women’s movement has done for them. They’re looking for what I call an assignment….

Your contemporary Ram Dass, has been admired lovingly as a man of “fierce grace.” It seems that your life, Jean, could be aptly described as one of “fierce compassion.” True?

(Laughing) Thank you. Yes. I mean, compassion is what is motivating me to do what I’m doing now.


Carl Jung’s concept of synchronicity, an acausal principle, connects the ego to the larger archetypal self. This connection is like the ancient Chinese concept of the Tao in that it cannot be rationally understood. Jean Shinoda Bolen suggests that the images of the ancient dieties represent powerful projections of the psyche.

From a psychological perspective, all of the gods can be viewed as suffering from dysfunctional relationships and character disorders. By studying the myths of the gods, we can learn much about ourselves. It is by facing the truth of our lives that we can die to our past ways and enter into a new order of being.

Jean Shinoda Bolen, M.D., a Jungian analyst, is author of The Tao of Psychology, Goddesses in Every Woman, Gods in Every Man and The Ring of Power. She is a clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco.

Listening to God ~ Global Spirit

Throughout history, the “mystical path” or the spiritual approach of achieving “direct contact” with the Divine has resulted in powerful spiritual experiences. While often bordering on the ineffable, some of these mystical experiences have actually led to the founding of a world religion, or spawned some of the most profound ecstatic poetry ever written.

For some thousand years, mystical practices have been a small but vital part of Christian, Jewish, Islamic, Hindu, and other faiths and native traditions. Yet those following the mystical path have so often been persecuted, being perceived as threatening to the power of the established religious orthodoxy. It has often been said that true mystics often have more in common with each other than with the more scripture-based adherents from within their own religions, and this Global Spirit program delightfully underscores that truth.

In this Global Spirit program, host Phil Cousineau joins Brother David Steindl-Rast, Rabbi Jonathan Omer-Man and Maata Lynn Barron to shed light on some of the common attributes of those who yearn for and reach, however momentarily, what they describe as a direct experience of God or the Divine. From the ancient Jewish Kabbalah and Islamic Sufi practices, to the spiritual illumination and epiphanies experienced through monastic contemplation, “The Mystical Experience” explores both experiential and analytical approaches to this rich subject.

Satish Kumar – Reverential Ecology

Keynsham Transition in Bristol UK hosted this inspiring talk by Satish Kumar on reverential ecology, a must see for those interested in how to relate to our planet.

Snippet taken from Resurgence article; “Satish Kumar is a former monk and long-term peace and environment activist. He has been quietly setting the Global Agenda for change for over 50 years. He was just nine when he left his family home to join the wandering Jains and 18 when he decided he could achieve more back in the world, campaigning for land reform in India and working to turn Gandhi’s vision of a renewed India and a peaceful world into reality.”

An overview of reverential ecology can be found here:
http://www.reverentialecology.org/kyoto_interview.htm

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