Gangaji: What are you saying to yourself?


Published on Jun 5, 2018
To stop doing what you are doing to perpetuate your suffering requires the willingness and the maturity to see what it is are you saying to yourself, and to stop that. Then you rest in enormous space that is your own consciousness.

From Gangaji’s recent retreat at Fallen Leaf Lake.

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The Practice of Self Inquiry – “Who Am I?” – Ram Dass

Ramana Maharshi said, “Look, it’s all very simple, everybody,” and then for 40 or 45 years all he did was go around telling everyone how simple it was. He said that all you keep doing is self inquiry, Vichara Atma – “Who am I?” You keep saying this, “Who am I? Who am I? Who am I?”

Here is an exercise you can go through:
You sit down quietly and you say, “Who am I?” and then the way I do it is I put the “I,” the thought of the “I” right in the middle of my head, right here, and I say, “I am not this body.” Then I experience my body as object to the “I” in the middle of my head. I see it. I feel it. I sense it as an object. Then I say, “I am not my five organs of action,” and then I experience my arms as objects, my legs as objects, my tongue as an object, my anal sphincter as object, and my genitals as objects. Each of them are experienced as “that” and here “I” am in the middle of my head. Then I say, “I am not my senses.”

Now, you have been in a room where there is a clock ticking and you start to read something, and you get so turned on by what you’re reading, you don’t hear the clock tick. Everybody is in that situation, and when you finish reading, then the clock is ticking again. Now actually, all the time you were there, the clock was ticking, your ear was hearing the clock tick, but you weren’t attending to your ear hearing the clock tick. It was involuntary. In other words, there is a place between the three and the two. There’s a place between your attention and your ear hearing the clock tick, so what you do is you don’t turn off, but you observe your hearing, like when I’m talking, watch your ear hearing me talk. Watch your eyes seeing, watch your nose smelling; note your mouth tasting; note your skin feeling. Do it all from a place right in the middle, the “I” thought. Then “I” am not my five internal organs, and you go through digestion, erection, excretion, respiration, perspiration, and circulation, and then you’re ready for the clincher, the exquisite one. You got all that? You’re finished with your body; now where are you? You’re in the middle of this “I” thought, in the middle of the head that you own, and you say, “I am not this thought.”

So then it becomes “Well, where am I?”… “I am here; I am here.” Any thought you can think of, you’re not that one.

If you can do that, and it takes quite a while, I mean really, a long time, you come to a place where you go behind your senses, and behind your thinking mind. When you are able to do that, you go through a doorway and you enter into what in Zen is called Satori, in Hindu is called Samadhi, and the beginning of what is known as Satchitananda. When you have gone through these stages within that, you come to a place where you are synonymous with that very fine energy, that is an identity with consciousness. Now you’ve got to understand that the identity, that energy, that very, very, fine energy, is an identity with consciousness – that the universe is consciousness; it is not self-consciousness, but it is consciousness.

Source: Ram DAss

Alberto Manni ‘The Forgotten Jewel of Self Knowledge.’ Interview by Renate McNay

Published on Apr 13, 2018

After the sudden ending of an intimate relationship Alberto suffered greatly with painful thoughts and feelings. He saw no way out. This pushed him onto a spiritual path. He discovered the “Gnostic Movement” and dived headlong into this knowledge. 

After a time when he had found a new relationship he and his partner sold their house, resigned from their jobs, and left Italy to move to South America where the School was based. They devoting their lives to the deepening of their understanding of their inner nature and worked for the good of the School. They loved it. 

After a time though they discovered some inconsistency between the School’s doctrine and the leaders behaviour. Eventually they left and lost all their friends at the school as nobody would greet them anymore. They were treated like strangers and had to rebuild their lives. 

What Alberto brought out with him from the School was the teaching of “Self Remembering”. When we do not remember ourselves we are asleep, we are not there. The only “real Life” we have during our day is what we do when awake; what is done from a state of Presence. Normally this is about 1%. We can live a whole day and perform most tasks that are required of us without being present or remembering our real selves.

Alberto also developed the “Conscious Learning course” for University students of all Faculties. http://www.spaziosereno.com

 

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Michael James ‘The Real Behind All Appearances’ Interview by Iain McNay

Published on Apr 7, 2018

Michael James ‘The Real Behind All Appearances’ Interview by Iain McNay
Author of ‘Happiness and The Art Of Being – An Introduction to the philosophy and practice of the spiritual teachings of Bhagavan Sri Ramana.’ Michael travelled overland to India when he was 19 to help find some deeper meaning to his life. He discovered the book ‘Who Am I’ by Ramana Maharashi and went to Tiruvannamallai where Ramana had lived to find out more about him. There he connected with Sri Sadhu Om who had been a student of Ramana Maharashi and ended up living there for 20 years. 

He learnt Tamil and translated many books into English. He is widely regarded now as the principle scholar of Ramana’s teachings and spends his time translating his work. http://www.happinessofbeing.com/

Where Do Our Thoughts Come From? ~ Rupert Spira

Published on Apr 6, 2018

A woman who has noticed that she has no control over her thoughts wants to know where they come from.

The Dream of the Cosmos: A Quest for the Soul by Anne Baring (Author)

The Dream of the Cosmos is the story of a multi-layered quest to understand the causes of human suffering and to reconnect with a deeper reality than the one we inhabit in this physical dimension of experience. It seeks to answer the questions: “Who are we?” and “Why are we here, on this planet?” It is offered to those who are looking for something beyond the superficial values of our culture, who may be disillusioned with religious and secular belief systems as currently presented and who question political values which are deeply mired in the pursuit of power. It is written with two voices: one the voice of a personal quest and the other which explores the historical and psychological causes that have brought into being our present view of reality.


Anne Baring (1931-) is the author and co-author of seven books and has recently published her latest one — “The Dream of the Cosmos: A Quest for the Soul”. She is a Jungian analyst and lives near Winchester, England. She is passionately interested in the fate of the Earth and the survival of our species in this critically important time of evolutionary change. Her work is devoted to the recognition that we live in an ensouled world and to the restoration of the lost sense of communion between us and the invisible dimension of the universe that is the source or ground of all that we call ‘life’. Website: http://www.annebaring.com

Anne Baring on “The Dream of the Cosmos”

In the course of writing two major books about the development of consciousness in the West and how the conscious mind became dissociated from the deeper matrix out of which it arose, I discovered that one of the foremost reasons for this was the split that developed between spirit and nature in the Western philosophical and religious traditions. This split arose from the belief that a Creator God inhabited a realm that was totally transcendent to the material world of nature and matter and from the repression and loss of the far older tradition of a Mother Goddess who brought forth all cosmic and earthly life from her womb, therefore unifying creator and creation.

In the West, from the sixteenth century onwards, science developed on the foundation of this split. Believing that matter is the only reality, it has taken the “rational mind” as its guide and the brain as the sole origin of consciousness, dismissing any alternative view as superstition. It has ultimately discarded both God and the soul. It apparently ignores the further potential evolutionary development of human consciousness and the states of mind that have long been explored in the metaphysical traditions of both East and West.

At the present time however, something of immense significance is emerging: a new cosmology is being born; a new vision of our profound relationship with a conscious, intelligent universe and a new consensus among a growing number of physicists, astro-physicists and cosmologists that cosmic consciousness and not matter is the primary ground of reality and our own consciousness. Instead of seeing the universe as a gigantic machine with our bodies as miniature machines, they are seeing it as a unified organism with ourselves as part of that multi-levelled organism.

This emerging paradigm, together with the growing environmental movement, gives us hope that we may rescue nature from our predatory and exploitive habits in time to counteract the danger of destroying not only millions more species, but our own as well. It invites us to recognise ourselves as having a role on this planet in the service of nature and ultimately the cosmos, to know ourselves in our innermost nature as cosmic beings, incarnated here for a purpose, aware of our fundamental unity. This awakening to a new phase of our evolutionary journey might be described as living the dream of the cosmos.

Suggested Reading: the book The Dream of the Cosmos with online chapters at http://www.annebaring.com

Anne Baring. MA Oxon (b. 1931) is a Jungian analyst and the author and co-author of seven books including, with Jules Cashford (1992), The Myth of the Goddess; Evolution of an Image; with Andrew Harvey, The Mystic Vision (1995) and The Divine Feminine (1996); and with Dr. Scilla Elworthy, Soul Power: an Agenda for a Conscious Humanity (2009). Her most recent book, published in May 2013, is The Dream of the Cosmos: a Quest for the Soul. Her work is devoted to the recognition that we live in an ensouled world and to the restoration of the lost sense of communion between us and the invisible dimension of the Cosmos that is the source or ground of all that we call ‘life’. Her website is devoted to the affirmation of a new vision of reality and the issues facing us at this crucial time of choice. See http://www.annebaring.com/

The Secret of “Who Am I?” Enquiry! Eckhart Tolle

Published on Mar 27, 2018

In this video, Eckhart Tolle tells who you actually are at the deepest level!

What is Self Enquiry and how it reveals your Divine Nature? Mooji

Published on Mar 13, 2018

In this video, Mooji Baba tells how Self Inquiry reveals our Divine Nature and what it really is!

The Secret of ‘Who Am I?’ Enquiry! Eckhart Tolle

How we should use the Who am I? enquiry method to know our true Being, tells Eckhart Tolle

In What Does My Experience Appear? ~ Rupert Spira

Published on Feb 16, 2018

This exploration leads to the discovery of ‘myself’, the medium in which all thoughts, sensations and perceptions appear.

A Mind at Home with Itself: How Asking Four Questions Can Free Your Mind, Open Your Heart, and Turn Your World Around by Byron Katie (Author),‎ Stephen Mitchell (Author)

Internationally acclaimed, bestelling author Byron Katie’s most anticipated work since Loving What Is

We live in difficult times, leaving far too many of us suffering from anxiety and depression, fear and anger. In her new and most anticipated work since Loving What Is, beloved spiritual teacher Byron Katie provides a much-needed beacon of light, and a source of hope and joy.

In A Mind at Home with Itself, Byron Katie illuminates one of the most profound ancient Buddhist texts, The Diamond Sutra (newly translated in these pages by Stephen Mitchell) to reveal the nature of the mind and to liberate us from painful thoughts, using her revolutionary system of self-inquiry called “The Work.” Byron Katie doesn’t merely describe the awakened mind; she empowers us to see it and feel it in action. At once startlingly fresh and powerfully enlightening, A Mind at Home with Itself offers us a transformative new perspective on life and death.

In the midst of a normal American life, Byron Katie became increasingly depressed and over a ten-year period sank further into despair and suicidal thoughts. Then one morning in 1986 she woke up in a state of absolute joy, filled with the realization of how her own suffering had ended. The freedom of that realization has never left her. Its direct result, The Work, has helped millions of people all over the world to question their stressful thoughts and set themselves free from suffering.

Byron Katie Book Signing & Interview | “A Mind at Home with Itself”

Byron answers questions from fans while signing her book “A Mind at Home with Itself”. Get your autographed first edition – http://premierecollectibles.com/a-min…

Recognize that content is not who you are! Eckhart Tolle


In this video, Eckhart Tolle tells us how content of our minds dominates our lives and we can’t see beyond that. We completely forget that it is not who we really are!

Adyashanti – When You Can’t Find Yourself

Published on Sep 30, 2017
Adyashanti – When You Can’t Find Yourself

The Practice of Self Inquiry – “Who Am I?” – Ram Dass

Try this “Who Am I?” exercise…



Ramana Maharshi said, “Look, it’s all very simple, everybody,” and then for 40 or 45 years all he did was go around telling everyone how simple it was. He said that all you keep doing is self inquiry, Vichara Atma – “Who am I?” You keep saying this, “Who am I? Who am I? Who am I?”

Here is an exercise you can go through:

You sit down quietly and you say, “Who am I?” and then the way I do it is I put the “I,” the thought of the “I” right in the middle of my head, right here, and I say, “I am not this body.” Then I experience my body as object to the “I” in the middle of my head. I see it. I feel it. I sense it as an object. Then I say, “I am not my five organs of action,” and then I experience my arms as objects, my legs as objects, my tongue as an object, my anal sphincter as object, and my genitals as objects. Each of them are experienced as “that” and here “I” am in the middle of my head. Then I say, “I am not my senses.”

Now, you have been in a room where there is a clock ticking and you start to read something, and you get so turned on by what you’re reading, you don’t hear the clock tick. Everybody is in that situation, and when you finish reading, then the clock is ticking again. Now actually, all the time you were there, the clock was ticking, your ear was hearing the clock tick, but you weren’t attending to your ear hearing the clock tick. It was involuntary. In other words, there is a place between the three and the two. There’s a place between your attention and your ear hearing the clock tick, so what you do is you don’t turn off, but you observe your hearing, like when I’m talking, watch your ear hearing me talk. Watch your eyes seeing, watch your nose smelling; note your mouth tasting; note your skin feeling. Do it all from a place right in the middle, the “I” thought. Then “I” am not my five internal organs, and you go through digestion, erection, excretion, respiration, perspiration, and circulation, and then you’re ready for the clincher, the exquisite one. You got all that? You’re finished with your body; now where are you? You’re in the middle of this “I” thought, in the middle of the head that you own, and you say, “I am not this thought.”

So then it becomes “Well, where am I?”… “I am here; I am here.” Any thought you can think of, you’re not that one.

If you can do that, and it takes quite a while, I mean really, a long time, you come to a place where you go behind your senses, and behind your thinking mind. When you are able to do that, you go through a doorway and you enter into what in Zen is called Satori, in Hindu is called Samadhi, and the beginning of what is known as Satchitananda. When you have gone through these stages within that, you come to a place where you are synonymous with that very fine energy, that is an identity with consciousness. Now you’ve got to understand that the identity, that energy, that very, very, fine energy, is an identity with consciousness – that the universe is consciousness; it is not self-consciousness, but it is consciousness.

Source: Spirituality Health

Know Yourself

Rupert reads an excerpt from “Know Thyself “ from the sufi mystic, Balyani in response to a woman on the path of devotion, who asked about being a servant of God.

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