Category: Self-inquiry/self-knowledge


How we should use the Who am I? enquiry method to know our true Being, tells Eckhart Tolle

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Published on Feb 16, 2018

This exploration leads to the discovery of ‘myself’, the medium in which all thoughts, sensations and perceptions appear.

Internationally acclaimed, bestelling author Byron Katie’s most anticipated work since Loving What Is

We live in difficult times, leaving far too many of us suffering from anxiety and depression, fear and anger. In her new and most anticipated work since Loving What Is, beloved spiritual teacher Byron Katie provides a much-needed beacon of light, and a source of hope and joy.

In A Mind at Home with Itself, Byron Katie illuminates one of the most profound ancient Buddhist texts, The Diamond Sutra (newly translated in these pages by Stephen Mitchell) to reveal the nature of the mind and to liberate us from painful thoughts, using her revolutionary system of self-inquiry called “The Work.” Byron Katie doesn’t merely describe the awakened mind; she empowers us to see it and feel it in action. At once startlingly fresh and powerfully enlightening, A Mind at Home with Itself offers us a transformative new perspective on life and death.

In the midst of a normal American life, Byron Katie became increasingly depressed and over a ten-year period sank further into despair and suicidal thoughts. Then one morning in 1986 she woke up in a state of absolute joy, filled with the realization of how her own suffering had ended. The freedom of that realization has never left her. Its direct result, The Work, has helped millions of people all over the world to question their stressful thoughts and set themselves free from suffering.

Byron Katie Book Signing & Interview | “A Mind at Home with Itself”

Byron answers questions from fans while signing her book “A Mind at Home with Itself”. Get your autographed first edition – http://premierecollectibles.com/a-min…


In this video, Eckhart Tolle tells us how content of our minds dominates our lives and we can’t see beyond that. We completely forget that it is not who we really are!

Published on Sep 30, 2017
Adyashanti – When You Can’t Find Yourself

Try this “Who Am I?” exercise…



Ramana Maharshi said, “Look, it’s all very simple, everybody,” and then for 40 or 45 years all he did was go around telling everyone how simple it was. He said that all you keep doing is self inquiry, Vichara Atma – “Who am I?” You keep saying this, “Who am I? Who am I? Who am I?”

Here is an exercise you can go through:

You sit down quietly and you say, “Who am I?” and then the way I do it is I put the “I,” the thought of the “I” right in the middle of my head, right here, and I say, “I am not this body.” Then I experience my body as object to the “I” in the middle of my head. I see it. I feel it. I sense it as an object. Then I say, “I am not my five organs of action,” and then I experience my arms as objects, my legs as objects, my tongue as an object, my anal sphincter as object, and my genitals as objects. Each of them are experienced as “that” and here “I” am in the middle of my head. Then I say, “I am not my senses.”

Now, you have been in a room where there is a clock ticking and you start to read something, and you get so turned on by what you’re reading, you don’t hear the clock tick. Everybody is in that situation, and when you finish reading, then the clock is ticking again. Now actually, all the time you were there, the clock was ticking, your ear was hearing the clock tick, but you weren’t attending to your ear hearing the clock tick. It was involuntary. In other words, there is a place between the three and the two. There’s a place between your attention and your ear hearing the clock tick, so what you do is you don’t turn off, but you observe your hearing, like when I’m talking, watch your ear hearing me talk. Watch your eyes seeing, watch your nose smelling; note your mouth tasting; note your skin feeling. Do it all from a place right in the middle, the “I” thought. Then “I” am not my five internal organs, and you go through digestion, erection, excretion, respiration, perspiration, and circulation, and then you’re ready for the clincher, the exquisite one. You got all that? You’re finished with your body; now where are you? You’re in the middle of this “I” thought, in the middle of the head that you own, and you say, “I am not this thought.”

So then it becomes “Well, where am I?”… “I am here; I am here.” Any thought you can think of, you’re not that one.

If you can do that, and it takes quite a while, I mean really, a long time, you come to a place where you go behind your senses, and behind your thinking mind. When you are able to do that, you go through a doorway and you enter into what in Zen is called Satori, in Hindu is called Samadhi, and the beginning of what is known as Satchitananda. When you have gone through these stages within that, you come to a place where you are synonymous with that very fine energy, that is an identity with consciousness. Now you’ve got to understand that the identity, that energy, that very, very, fine energy, is an identity with consciousness – that the universe is consciousness; it is not self-consciousness, but it is consciousness.

Source: Spirituality Health

Rupert reads an excerpt from “Know Thyself “ from the sufi mystic, Balyani in response to a woman on the path of devotion, who asked about being a servant of God.

Published on May 16, 2017We are who we are. The question is who are you? Who or what do you identify with?.. Who do you wish you were?… Sadly those will never be you.. Embrace your true nature your true desires in order to embrace your very own idea of happiness.


Published on May 3, 2017

Spiritual teacher Adyashanti says that we already know who we are. It is just that our mind cannot comprehend a state which is beyond its own definitions. So the moment we ask ‘Who am I?’ for a split second we experience the answer but we immediately get drawn away by the commentary of the mind: ‘This is not the Self, this is nothing special, this is not enlightenment, etc.’ The answer to that is to forget all the images and definitions that we have about enlightenment and consciousness and just be what we are.

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Published on Apr 27, 2017

When we stop looking for what is next, we can discover what is always here. Join Gangaji for a global webcast April 30 at 11 AM PSD http://www.gangaji.org/withGangaji


Published on Apr 18, 2017

Stop the search for what is next and discover what is always here.


Published on Feb 10, 2017

A conversation about aligning the activity of painting with the understanding.


Published on Dec 12, 2016

Sruti is a spiritual teacher who writes about her spiritual awakening within an experience with an uncommon and painful illness called Interstitial Cystitis. She has been interviewed on the Buddha at the Gas Pump talk show on YouTube about her experience of spiritual awakening in the midst of intense pain: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atG0z…

This ongoing and chronic condition challenged her to stay present with daily pain and to look further inward for answers. In an extreme moment of pain, in which consciousness began to fade, Sruti experienced the erasure of all that clouds over the earliest source of vision.

She watched as one by one the layers of the mind, the body and feelings disappeared before her. She asks the question: with whose vision are we seeing when the lights are going out? Has this early vision ever known anything at all?


Published on Dec 3, 2016

According to spiritual teacher Adyashanti we should question our sense of identity. And this enquiry on our true nature or on the question -Who am I?- should be taken seriously and with an open mind, without expecting answers. This is what Ramana Maharshi’s method invites us to do.

Published on Dec 2, 2016

A discussion about self-inquiry and the question ‘Who am I?’ versus ‘Am I aware?’

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