Category: Sufism/ Rumi


Published on Sep 28, 2017

Kabir Helminski holds a Sufi teaching “friendly conversation with a purpose”. In answering questions, Kabir outlines the Seven States of
“I-ness” and many other Sufi principles.

Advertisements

Rowdy, ecstatic, and sometimes stern, these teaching stories and fables reveal new and very human properties in Rumi’s vision. Included here are the notorious “Latin parts” that Reynold Nicholson felt were too unseemly to appear in English in his 1920s translation. For Rumi, anything that human beings do—however compulsive—affords a glimpse into the inner life.

Here are more than 40 fables or teaching stories that deal with love, laughter, death, betrayal, and the soul. The stories are exuberant, earthy, and bursting with vitality—much like a painting by Hieronymus Bosch or Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. The characters are guilty, lecherous, tricky, ribald, and finally possessors of opened souls.

Barks writes: “These teaching stories are a kind of scrimshaw—intricately carved, busy figures, confused and threatening, and weirdly funny.

This is an entertaining collection from one of the greatest spiritual poets of all time, rendered by his most popular translator.

“The minute I heard my first love story, I started looking for you, not knowing how blind that was. Lovers don’t finally meet somewhere. They’re in each other all along.”Rumi

Coleman Barks is an American poet, a former faculty member at the University of Georgia, and a renowned interpreter of Rumi and other mystic poets. He makes frequent international appearances and is well-known throughout the Middle East. His work has contributed to the creation of a strong Rumi following in the English-speaking world and the dissemination of Sufi ideas across many cultural boundaries. Barks received an honorary doctorate from Tehran University in 2006. He is the author of many books and lives in Athens, Georgia.

Rumi on Love By Coleman Barks

Published on Jul 31, 2017

The ecstatic poems of Jalal ad-Din Muhammad Rumi, a Persian poet and Sufi master born 807 years ago in 1207, have sold millions of copies in recent years, making him the most popular poet in the US. He’s a poet of joy and of love.

“This We Have Now” – An Interview with Coleman Barks

Published on Aug 4, 2015

This interview was recorded at Science and Nonduality Conference http://www.scienceandnonduality.com/. We talk with Coleman Barks about how he has come to translating Rumi’s poetry, how he met his teacher and how his teachings unfolded in his life.


Published on Feb 19, 2017

Sheikh Burhanuddin talks about his fascinating journey and experiences along his way to become a Sheikh under the guidance of his master, Sheikh Nazim. From an early age when he was very drawn to be in nature he soon committed his life to finding a master who could guide him on his path. His spent time on different ‘seclusions’ which were very influential and helpful him with many realizations. He also had a session with spiritual healer Stephen Turoff which triggered a very deep state which lasted for nearly 3 years. He goes on to explain the Uwaysi System which is now an integral part of his teaching.


Published on Dec 4, 2016

From the event, “Where the Two Seas Meet: An Introduction to Sufism” with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

This talk asks the question “What is Sufism?” and explores its esoteric nature.

Historical Beginnings of Sufism – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Published on Dec 4, 2016

From the event, “Where the Two Seas Meet: An Introduction to Sufism” with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

This talk is part two of An Introduction to Sufism and includes a description of Sufism’s historical beginnings and some of the early Sufi saints.


Published on Dec 4, 2016

An awareness of the inner worlds is an essential part of our human heritage—those worlds that are invisible to our physical sight, but exist in other dimensions of reality. However, this awareness has been censored by rational consciousness and our present culture. This talk explores our need to reclaim our connection to these realities, to return to the greater wholeness to which we belong.

101 Helpful Illusions highlights natural veils waiting to be transcended by disciplined courage, wisdom and insight. Everything in creation has a purpose relevant to a specific situation that could lead the seeker of higher knowledge towards the ultimate spiritual truth of oneness. Thus our egotistic vices can indeed be stepping stones towards acting selflessly, spontaneously, and cheerfully with heightened awareness and good expectations in all situations. Indeed, all our mistakes can lead us towards the desired spiritual awakening – the ultimate purpose in life: experiencing and knowing the universal oneness.


Shaykh Fadhlalla Haeri is a writer-philosopher from the Islamic city of Karbala, who combines knowledge and experience of the spiritual teachings of the East with a keen understanding of the West. He has recently established the Academy of Self Knowledge (ASK) in South Africa, aimed at the committed seeker of self knowledge and spiritual development. Shaykh Haeri’s main focus has been to make the Qur’an more universally available. He continues to travel and lecture widely and is the author of numerous books on Islam, Sufism and the Qur’an, including The Thoughtful Guide to Islam, The Thoughtful Guide to Sufism, Son of Karbala, and Witnessing Perfection (all O books).

Look Inside

Shaykh Fadhlalla Haeri- Different Levels of Enlightenment

Shaykh Fadhlalla Haeri- On the Question of “Who am I?”

Shaykh Fadhlalla Haeri-Enlightenment and Islam


Seyyed Hossein Nasr, one of the world’s leading experts on Islamic science and spirituality, and Swami Atmarupananda, renowned teacher of Hinduism, will talk about Compassion as being intrinsic to who we really are — the true Self, the “image of God” which is free of all alienation. And that is wisdom itself, love itself, discovered in inner silence — the still point that unites us to both God and the universe.

http://www.festivaloffaiths.org

The headlines are filled with the politics of Islam, but there is another side to the world’s fastest-growing religion. Sufism is the poetry and mysticism of Islam. This mystical movement from the early ninth century rejects worship motivated by the desire for heavenly reward or the fear of punishment, insisting rather on the love of God as the only valid form of adoration. Sufism has made significant contributions to Islamic civilization in music and philosophy, dance and literature. The Sufi poet Rumi is the bestselling poet in America. But in recent centuries Sufism has been a target for some extremist Islamic movements as well as many modernists. The Garden of Truth presents the beliefs and vision of the mystical heart of Islam, along with a history of Sufi saints and schools of thought.

In a world threatened by religious wars, depleting natural resources, a crumbling ecosystem, and alienation and isolation, what has happened to our humanity? Who are we and what are we doing here? The Sufi path offers a journey toward truth, to a knowledge that transcends our mundane concerns, selfish desires, and fears. In Sufism we find a wisdom that brings peace and a relationship with God that nurtures the best in us and in others.

Noted scholar Seyyed Hossein Nasr helps you learn the secret wisdom tradition of Islam and enter what the ancient mystics call the “garden of truth.” Here, liberate your mind, experience peace, discover your purpose, fall in love with the Divine, and find your true, best self.

Photo by Ibrahim Kalin

Seyyed Hossein Nasr is university professor of Islamic Studies at George Washington University. Author of over fifty books, Professor Nasr is a well-known and highly respected intellectual figure both in the West and in the Islamic world. Born in Tehran, raised from the age of twelve in the United States, and a graduate of MIT and Harvard University, Nasr is well qualified to explain Islam to a Western audience. He appears frequently on Meet the Press, as well as other national news shows.

Look Inside

Seyyed Hossein Nasr: Sacred Silence in Sufism and the Vedanta


Published on Oct 20, 2015

The absolute reality of all mystical traditions is one and the same. Only the mystical vision can bring us lasting peace and happiness.


Deepak Chopra & Madonna – My Burning Heart – Bittersweet from the ”Love Poems of Rûmi”
My Burning Heart
My heart is burning with love
All can see this flame
My heart is pulsing with passion
like waves on an ocean
my friends have become strangers
and I’m surrounded by enemies
But I’m free as the wind
no longer hurt by those who reproach me

I’m at home wherever I am
And in the room of lovers
I can see with closed eyes
the beauty that dances
Behind the veils
intoxicated with love
I too dance the rhythm
of this moving world

I have lost my senses
in my world of lovers

Bittersweet
written by Rumi, edited by Deepak Chopra, reading by Madonna
———-

In my hallucination
I saw my beloved’s flower garden
In my vertigo, in my dizziness
In my drunken haze
Whirling and dancing like a spinning wheel

I saw myself as the source of existence
I was there in the beginning
And I was the spirit of love
Now I am sober
There is only the hangover
And the memory of love
And only the sorrow

I yearn for happiness
I ask for help
I want mercy
And my love says:

Look at me and hear me
Because I am here
Just for that

I am your moon and your moonlight too
I am your flower garden and your water too
I have come all this way, eager for you
Without shoes or shawl

I want you to laugh
To kill all your worries
To love you
To nourish you

Oh sweet bitterness
I will soothe you and heal you
I will bring you roses
I, too, have been covered with thorns

Intoxicated by Love
Because of your love
I have lost my sobriety
I am intoxicated
By the madness of love

In this fog
I have become a stranger to myself
I’m so drunk
I’ve lost the way to my house

In the garden
I see only your face
From trees and blossoms
I inhale only your fragrance

Drunk with the ecstasy of love
I can no longer tell the difference
Between drunkard and drink
Between Lover and Beloved

Enlightening Poems by Rumi

The following poems were written by Jelaluddin Rumi in the 13th Century A.D. His words are often mysterious, yet often refer to his personal search and passionate, intimate connection with the Divine Presence within.

2010 Reprint of 1926 London Edition. Full facsimile of the original edition, not reproduced with Optical Recognition Software. Gibran [1887 – April 10, 1931] was a Lebanese American artist, poet, and writer. He is chiefly known in the English speaking world for his 1923 book “The Prophet”, a series of philosophical essays written in English prose. An early example of Inspirational fiction, the book sold well despite a cool critical reception, and became extremely popular in the 1960s counterculture.

Much of Gibran’s writings deal with Christianity, especially on the topic of spiritual love. His poetry is notable for its use of formal language, as well as insights on topics of life using spiritual terms. “The Prophet” is of composed of twenty-six poetic essays. The book became especially popular during the 1960s with the American counterculture and New Age movements. Since it was first published in 1923, it has never been has never been out of print. Having been translated into more than forty languages, it was one of the bestselling books of the twentieth century in the United States. Gibran is the third best-selling poet of all time, behind Shakespeare and Lao-Tzu.


Published on Jan 19, 2015

I do not own or have rights to this material.

From the Album The Prophet, A Musical Interpretation Featuring Richard Harris. Music Composed By Arif Mardin. 1974 Atlantic.

Video http://www.zenchantment.com Directed by Milos Kuhlman
2012 All Rights Reserved.

Ed Mathew’s presents

The Prophet
By Kahlil Gibran

Featuring: Richard Harris

Executive Producers: Jerry Wexler and Ed Mathews

Atlantic Recording Corporation 75 Rockefeller Plaza, New Yerk, NY 10019 A Time
Warner Company copyright 1974

1: The Coming of the Ship
2: On Love (8.40 mins)
3: On Marriage
4: On Children
5: Trilogy From “The Prophet”
(Love, Marriage, Children)
6: On Giving
7: On Eating and Drinking
8: On Clothes
9: On Work
10: On Crime and Punishment
11: On Laws
12: On Teaching and Self-Knowledge
13: On Friendship
14: On Pleasure
15: Theme From “The Prophet”
(Pleasure is a freedom song”
16: On Religion
17: On Death
18: The Farewell

Looking back over almost half a century of spiritual practice, I sometimes ask myself what was the greatest challenge, the most difficult lesson. On the spiritual quest we are faced with our love and longing, our darkest fears, our failings. We are taken into the darkness and then into the light. I do not believe that there is anything so demanding or exhilarating as this inner journey. And yet more and more I return to something so simple and essential, and almost unbearably difficult: learning to bow down before God.

As Rumi, the thirteenth-century Sufi mystic, tells us, “There are a hundred ways to kneel and kiss the ground.” Each in our own way we have to learn to bow down, to want nothing for ourself. But what does it mean to want nothing for oneself?

One of the dangers of much contemporary spirituality is a focus on personal fulfillment, on living a richer and more meaningful life. The inner journey does give us access to a depth of meaning that a focus solely on the outer, physical world, denies us. But central to mystical life is the understanding of spiritual or mystical poverty, a state of inner emptiness or surrender, of offering oneself completely. Again to quote Rumi,

Last night my master taught me the lesson of poverty
Having nothing and wanting nothing.

So simple and so difficult, this wanting nothing for oneself. For many years I wondered at the saying of Christ’s in the Sermon on the Mount, “Blessed are the poor in spirit, for theirs is the kingdom of heaven.” Known as one of the “Beatitudes,” the idea of poverty of spirit mystified me until I began to understand how essential our inner poverty is before God, that we are nothing, that we have nothing of real worth to offer God except our surrender, our bowing down. In a culture dominated by acquisition, by images of material and even spiritual self-worth, it can be difficult to understand the deeper value of “having nothing and wanting nothing.” But in my own experience it is this inner longing, this “poverty of spirit” that allows us to live in the presence of God, that enables us to be of service. All we can ever be is an empty cup waiting to be filled. This is echoed in a Sufi prayer, “I offer to Thee the only thing I have, my capacity to be used by Thee.”

Meditation, longing, and prayer can take us to this inner space, this place that is deep within the heart of each of us. Here in the silence of our innermost being is a state of divine receptivity, part of the feminine mystery of the soul: how it bows down before God. Whatever inner experiences we are given on the path — experiences of love and light, longing and pain, the peace or bliss of our divine nature — we are finally taken to this place. It is our natural state of inner surrender, a state of service to God.

We all carry this secret in our inner being, but the challenge for each of us is to live this in our daily life, particularly in a culture that celebrates the ego and its accomplishments. How can we bow down before God in the midst of life’s many demands? Outwardly we can aspire to live as simple a life as possible, though even this is not easy if our outer life requires that we drive a car, have a mortgage and healthcare to pay for — even having a computer seems almost an essential part of today’s life! An uncluttered outer life can give us more space for an inner life, and for the time and attention this requires. But real poverty of spirit is an inner attitude, an inner recognition that only the deep connection in the heart can fulfill us, can meet our deepest needs. In essence it is a constant state of prayer, an inner emptiness that we carry with us, this space for the divine that is present amidst our daily activities, our work and family, shopping and cleaning, laughing and making love.

Spiritual poverty is not a denial or renunciation of life’s pleasures, its joys or sorrows. As one Sufi wrote, “it is turning away from everything that is not God, but there is not anything that is not God!” Rather it is a celebration of the divine that is present within everything, within every smile and every tear. Bowing down before God we give space for the love within our own heart and within all that exists.

The mystical path takes us to the center of life and to the center of our self. It is a simple way to live, awake to the oneness of love. In the words of an ancient prayer:

At Thy Command Only Will I Carry Out the Pilgrimage of Life
For The Love of All Created By Thee and for Thy Glory.

For the Love of All Created by Thee – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Published on May 26, 2015

The miraculous gift of a prayer and the cry of the heart.

http://www.goldensufi.org
http://www.workingwithoneness.org
http://www.spiritualecology.org

Permissions: “Panoramic view of the Himalayas from Kausani, Uttarakhand” by Gaurav Agrawal from Delhi, India. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://tinyurl.com/lb58vuk. “Trisul, Nanda Devi and Himalayan range from Kausani, Uttarakhand” by http://www.flickr.com/photos/sanjoy/2…. Licensed under CC BY 2.0 via Wikimedia Commons – http://tinyurl.com/mlzlkyn.


Within the Heart of Hearts is a journey into the mystical secrets of the heart. Designed to be read like a medieval book of hours, it uses prose, poetry, and images as a series of meditations on the stages of love’s mystical journey, from the initial experience of searching and the heart’s longing, to the ecstatic union with God, the lover united with the Beloved. This simple but powerful description of the Sufi journey reminds us of this living tradition of divine love.

Taking advantage of the format of an eBook, beautiful images speak directly to the soul, as do the poems that touch the heart. Here is the poetry of Rumi, Hafiz, Ibn ‘Arabi, and other Sufi masters placed within the context of the stages of the heart’s opening to God. Speaking the universal language of love, they allow each of us to feel the mystery, wonder, and bliss that belongs to the heart of hearts, the mystical secret that is hidden within us. They draw us deep within our own heart, where this intoxicating relationship of lover and Beloved takes place.

The popularity of Rumi has shown a thirst in the West for mystical love. This small book is a way to drink deeply of this wine of love, this tradition of lovers of God. Written by a contemporary Sufi, Within the Heart of Hearts is based upon a lived experience of the Sufi path and the inner experiences of the heart.

INTRODUCTION

The mystical journey is the greatest undertaking we can ever make, a journey inward into the heart of hearts, the mysterious core of our own being. On this journey we will encounter the depths of the darkness within us, of our fears and failures, and then a light and a love beyond imagining. We are taken by love to love, into the pain, the tenderness and then the unbelievable bliss of oneness with the divine. This is humanity’s greatest secret, hidden within each of us.

Since the very beginning there have always been those who are drawn to follow love’s calling, to make this impossible journey into the center of the heart. Some of these travellers came to be called Sufis (the name possibly referring to their white woolen garments, sûf, or an indication of their purity of heart, safâ). And some of them have left signposts of their journey—poems and stories of their heart’s opening, of the transformations wrought through the power and pain of the love along the mystical way. This little book, following some of those signposts, takes us through some of the stages of the journey on this secret path within the heart.

The poems in these pages point to an unfolding story. In its more familiar form, this is the narrative of the mystical journey that takes us from the experience of separation to the oneness of union with God—a journey, as those who have been taken on this path have told us, that passes through longing, struggle and pain, as well as bliss. But underneath this story lies another less-told one, not about a journey, but about a relationship.

Mystical life can be seen as an unfolding inner relationship between the soul and its Beloved. This relationship is always present, though it is hidden by life’s outer activity, by our ego, by the mind and its thoughts. It is a relationship of love: the love affair with the Beloved that is always alive in the core of our being, within the heart of hearts. Its story is the story of the mystic’s gradual opening, as she steps into the arena of the heart where this love affair is taking place, into a fuller and fuller experience of the love that is always present.

The poems that follow speak to this inner love affair. They tell of the nearness, the sweetness, as well as the suffering of love. This is the one story of divine love within all that exists, that spins the heart as well as the sun and the stars. And it is also our own intimate love affair, the passion of our own soul.

This book, with its poems and images, is designed to be experienced as a series of meditations, like a medieval book of hours. It is hoped that the reader will allow these meditations to unlock the secret of the hidden story of love they point to, so that once again we can hear what the Beloved is saying, come to know how much we are loved.

Chambers of the Heart – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee outlines the spiritual journey on the Naqshbandi Path as an unveiling of the chambers of the heart, from the awakening of longing to the annihilation in Absolute Truth.

This talk was given at the 2008 Sufi Conference. See also: vimeo.com/channels/suficonference and suficonference.org


Published on Mar 27, 2015
Recorded December 3, 2011 at the Mercy Center, Burlingame, California

Prayer is a response to a need. Our need. The Beloved’s need. And at this time, most pressingly, the need of the Earth.

From the book Prayer of the Heart: goldensufi.org/book_desc_prayer_heart.ht­ml
Category
Nonprofits & Activism

%d bloggers like this: