Spiritual Insights Into The Interpretation of Mass, Space and Time – Catherine Pepin


As above, so below—said Hermes Trismegistus. In physics, perception is limited towards the infinitesimally small by the Planck scale defined by the Heisenberg inequalities; towards the infinitely big by the speed of light and the theory of relativity. In between those two scales lies our material world, of observable objects, subject to the laws of causality and to the tyranny of Time.

Sages and mystics of all time, on the other hand, have hinted at the observation that notime is present in meditation. At first sight we could believe that causality has just simply evaporated, and that the non-dual world is non-causal. In this presentation we will see that a more beautiful hypothesis leads us to envision that in meditation, causality has become instantaneous, not a-causal. In this framework the non-dual world is super-causal rather than non-causal. This assumption will lead us to reconsider the notions of mass, space and time from a spiritual perspective.

CATHERINE PÉPIN, PH.D. : 1.Where do Quantum Physics and Nonduality Meet? 2.Science and the Big Questions

An excerpt from the interview with Catherine Pepin featured in the Science and Nonduality Anthology Vol. 5.

CATHERINE PÉPIN, PH.D. Theoretical Physicist, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Saclay, France In 2005, she received a strong spiritual call which told her that in addition to the wonders of Scientific endeavour, there is an unmistakable Otherness, a presence impalpable to the mind. She was exposed to a number of spiritual teachings and experiences, starting in June 2006 with the meeting of late Stephen Jourdain’. In 2007, she went through a Shamanic initiation involving Iboga and Ayahuasca, the African and South Amazon sacred plants known to open doors of the Spirit.

Today, she is developing her own path, and is convinced that the spiritual call she received in 2005, while she was still a fundamentally materialistic scientist, was not an accident . It was an experience of a universal longing in the human Soul for a deep and uncompromising re-union of Science and Spirit.

Science and the Big Questions

Transcending the Speed of Light : Consciousness, Quantum Physics, and the Fifth Dimension By Marc Seifer

A study of the new scientific understanding of consciousness and the mind as a fifth dimension of reality

• Introduces the existence of a fifth dimension–one of mind–an inner- or hyperspace where time is transcended

• Shows how the barrier of the speed of light is actually a gateway demarking the fifth dimension

Since the introduction of Descartes’ dualism in the seventeenth century, the mind and the physical world have been viewed as disconnected entities. Yet qualities of mind such as awareness, purposeful action, organization, design, and even decision-making are present within the structure of matter and within the dimensions of space and time.

The space-time continuum of scientists generally ignores the realm of the mind, though phenomena such as imaginary numbers, used by Einstein to combine space with time, are concepts that only exist in the mind.

Marc Seifer contends that the inadequacy of four-dimensional models to account for our experience of mental phenomena points to the consciousness of the mind as a higher organizing principle, a fifth dimension where thoughts are as real and quantifiable as our familiar physical world.

He shows that because thought enables us to move backward and forward through time–reflecting on the past and making plans for the future–this fifth dimension of mind breaks the laws of relativity, thereby transcending the speed of light. His extensive study of this fifth dimension ranges from relativity and ether theory to precognition, telepathy, and synchronicity, all from the perspective of the conscious universe.

Marc J. Seifer, PhD has been a handwriting expert for more than 35 years and was editor-in-chief of The Journal of the American Society of Professional Graphologists for more than a decade. He has worked for the Rhode Island Attorney General’s Office and Crime Laboratory, the Department of Defense, Undersea Warfare, United Parcel Service, and numerous banks, insurance agencies, and lawyers.

He was featured on the History Channel discussing the Howard Hughes Mormon Will and on Associated Press International TV on the handwriting of bin Laden. He has lectured at Oxford University, Cambridge University, Brandeis, Cranbrook Retreat, and numerous conferences around the world. Dr. Seifer teaches psychology and forensic graphology at Roger Williams University in Bristol, Rhode Island.

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The Awakening of Consciousness: Adventures On The Spiritual Path by Frank M. Wanderer (Author), Ervin Kery (Editor)

We are all on a spiritual journey. This journey starts with birth and ends with death. Our life is a link between our date of birth and date of death. A link that contains all the secrets, dramas, tragedies and comedies of our lives, and we are so deeply involved in this performance that we tend to forget who we really are: the shining Consciousness. This book is about this spiritual journey.

Click here to take a look inside

Evolution of Consciousness

Nowadays, humanity arrived in a very important stage in the evolutionary progress of Consciousness.
It’s a turning point in every person’s life: the Consciousness awakes in us from its sleep and admires the beauty of Its creation.

Watch this video to see the apects of this awakening!

Based on the books

„The Awakening of Consciousness”
by Frank M. Wanderer

Adventures on the Spiritual Path

We are all on a spiritual journey. This journey starts with birth
and ends with death. Our life is a link between our date of birth and date of death.
A link that contains all the secrets, dramas, tragedies and comedies of our lives, and we are so deeply involved in this performance that we tend to forget who we really are:
the shining Consciousness.

Based on the book
The Awakening of Consciousness
by Frank M. Wanderer
Pub. Date: January 2014

This book is about this spiritual journey.

The Last Chapter of our Personal History

The last chapter of one’s personal history begins when the Wanderer becomes a spiritual seeker……..

Based on the book
The Awakening of Consciousness
by Frank M. Wanderer

Who am I?

We are all on a spiritual journey. For everybody, this journey starts with birth and ends with death.
Our life is a link between our date of birth and date of death.
The book of our life stretches between the two end points, and this book is the chronicle of our wanderings.
We have recognized that we are suffering, we are suffocated in the swamp of the multitude of beliefs and ideas, and this recognition spurs us to embark on a Journey to discover ourselves.
Understanding all this is the beginning of the real JOURNEY along the road.

Based on the book
The Awakening of Consciousness
by Frank M. Wanderer

Surprising Truth

A tiny seed of Truth is found in every human being. Similarly to the seed of a tree, the tiny seed contains great potentials. A lot of people are unaware of this, so they try to find the Truth outside of themselves: in the world of forms and shapes.

Based on the book
„The Awakening of Consciousness”
by Frank M. Wanderer
Pub. Date: January 2014

The Untrue Story of You: How To Let Go Of The Past That Creates You, And Become Fully Alive In The Present by Bryan Hubbard (Author)

In The Untrue Story of You, Bryan Hubbard presents a powerful, groundbreaking theory explaining who we really are, how our relationship to our past affects us and how we can finally find true healing. In the pages of this book, you will discover that ‘you’ are actually made up of Three Selves, or time-bodies – past, present and potential – and that these three distinct entities send out energetic pulses, or waves, that interact to create your experience of life.

As you move through life, experiences you never fully understood from your past begin to weigh you down, causing you to respond in the present with anxiety and fear without knowing why. As this pattern repeats itself, it can drag you into depression or addictive behaviours that are seemingly out of your control. Sharing his own moving story of overcoming the painful experiences of his childhood, Bryan teaches you how to heal the negative patterns you have created in your life, and, through a 21-day programme, become the real ‘you’ – the child you once were who could see the world as it really is, an unfolding miracle in the present moment.

Bryan Hubbard is a successful publisher and journalist, and editor of the well-respected international magazine What Doctors Don’t Tell You, which he produces with his wife, bestselling author Lynne McTaggart. http://www.bryanhubbard.net

Take a look inside


Uploaded on Aug 15, 2014
Bryan Hubbard introduces The Untrue Story of You

Bryan Hubbard: Living Life Outside of Time

Published on Feb 2, 2015
Bryan Hubbard joins us to talk about living a unique and enlivened life. We are tied to repeat experiences when we put restrictions on life. Time is one such restriction. Framing every experience as a point in time is a misunderstanding of reality – and it prevents us from having a direct experience. Direct experience occurs when we are not binding everything to rules about how life works.

For more information about Bryan’s work, please visit: http://bryanhubbard.net/

Panel – Scientific Views and Meaning of Entanglement

Published on Dec 26, 2014
A panel discussion with Henry Stapp, Federico
Faggin, Neil Theise; moderated by Menas Kafatos.

Entanglement has a well-understood meaning in quantum mechanics. However, as any term, this very important concept has different interpretations and meanings, even among scientists. In this panel of scientists, the panelists will briefly discuss their own understanding and we will then attempt to identify a meaning very relevant in each panelists view to life.

The Ending of Time :Where Philosophy and Physics Meet by Jiddu Krishnamurti

The provocative and penetrating philosophical classic of science and spirituality—a discourse between the revered spiritual leader Krishnamurti and renowned physicist Dr. David Bohm, exploring the origin of human conflict and what we can do about the barriers that stand in the way of insight and consciousness, now revised and updated with a new introduction and added dialogues.

The Ending of Time is a series of important and enlightening dialogues in which Jiddu Krishnamurti and Dr. David Bohm—men from vastly different backgrounds in philosophy and physics, respectively—debate profound existential questions that illuminate the fundamental nature of existence, probing topics such as insight, illusion, awakening, transcendence, renewal, morality, the temporal, and the spiritual. Along the way, Krishnamurti and Bohm explore a person’s relationship to society and offer new insights on human thought, death, awakening, self realization, and the problem of the fragmented mind.

The Ending of Time also refers to the wrong turn humanity has taken—a state that they argue can be corrected. Though they insist that mankind can change fundamentally, they warn that transformation requires going from one’s narrow and particular interests toward the general, and ultimately moving still deeper into that purity of compassion, love and intelligence that originates beyond thought, time, and even emptiness.
This updated edition, edited and revised in clear and engaging language, includes a new introduction and a conversation previously published separately which examines “The Future of Humanity.”

J. Krishnamurti & D. Bohm – The Ending of Time (Dialogue One)

Published on Jun 15, 2012
Dialogue 1 – The Roots Of Psychological Conflict

The Ending of Time (1 / 8)

Penetrating dialogues between the great spiritual leader and the renowned physicist shed light on fundamental questions of existence.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jiddu_Kr…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Bohm

“In many cases David Bohm would be helping Krishnamurti to clarify, not so much Krishnamurti’s perceptions – he couldn’t do that – but the way Krishnamurti presented them, the language he used and the course of the discussion. Sometimes there were generalizations Krishnamurti would make that Dave would pounce upon and get him to refine.” F.D.Peat

What Is Time to the Unconscious Mind? – Julia Mossbridge, M.A., Ph.D.

Published on Dec 9, 2014

For most of us, our everyday conscious minds feel the stream of conscious experience flowing linearly through what we call the past, present and future. But how do non-conscious mental processes interact with events that take place in time? By definition, we aren’t privy to our non-conscious minds, so to get at this question, we have to use some tricks.

I will first briefly describe current neuroscientific and psychological ideas about how everyday conscious awareness creates a sense of order and temporal flow. Then we will delve into the methods used to examine how non-conscious processes interact with events, and how the results of such experiments can inform our understanding about the nature of reality and time. Specifically, I will describe the methods and implications of experiments examining non-conscious “time bending” (i.e., differences between our everyday conscious version of time and the versions accessed by non-conscious processes), including presentiment/precognition experiments and their implications.

Finally, I will discuss a new model describing how the so-called past, present, and future collapse under the influence non-conscious processing. Taken from another point of view, this model also addresses how the past, present, and future are manufactured for use by everyday conscious processes.

The Four Dimensional Experience of Time and Space Takes Place in Dimensionless Awareness


Published on Oct 10, 2014
An elaboration on the four dimensional world of time and space taking place in dimensionless and timeless Awareness.

The Non-Existence of Time


Published on Sep 30, 2014

In this clip, Rupert explores the implications of the non-existence of time.

1. What is Awareness? 2.Can the presence of awareness ever lack something? – Rupert Spira

What is Awareness?

TIME IS NEVER EXPERIENCED
Rupert Spira, Artist and Nonduality Teacher
All experience is now. Try to step out of now into a past or future. Where do we or could we go? It is not possible to experience a past or future. We experience thoughts about a past or future but never the past and future themselves. This very now is the only now there is. It is not a moment in time. There is no ‘present moment.’ There is no time present in which the now could move forwards or backwards. It is eternally now.

Unhappiness is always an avoidance or rejection of the now. Our self, aware presence, is intimately one with all experience in the now. It knows no rejection of the now and is, therefore, happiness itself. The thought-made self is a movement of resistance or seeking, away from the now into an imaginary past or future. All avoidance and seeking is for the thought-made self, never for the true and only self of aware presence. The belief that time is real is essential to the perpetuation of this imaginary self; such a self feeds on the past and future. The now is the only place the separate self cannot stand. The now, in which all peace and happiness reside, is the only place the true and only self can be.

All the imaginary self’s seeking longs only for the happiness that is inherent in the now. The imaginary self approaches the now like a moth approaches a flame. It longs for the flame but cannot experience it. It can only die in it. Likewise the imaginary self longs only for the happiness that resides in our self. However, it cannot experience it; it can only die in it. That death is the experience of happiness. This happiness lies at the heart of all experience, never imposing itself but never veiling itself, simply waiting with open arms to be recognized.

Time and Eternity Intersect in the Now ~ Rupert Spira

Published on Aug 22, 2014

Rupert explores our belief in time.

Consciousness, Entanglement and Life – Hameed Ali (A.H. Almaas)


Published on Jul 19, 2014
In this interview Hameed Ali (A. H. Almaas) discusses what the quantum phenomena of entanglement is pointing to in terms of spiritual path and intimate relationships. He presents in brief the theme of the upcoming Science and Nonduality Conference 2014 “Consciousness, Entanglement and Life.”

Timeless Deep Sleep ~ Rupert Spira


Published on Jul 15, 2014

In this video clip, Rupert clarifies a common misconception about deep sleep being a state that lasts in time.

Allowing the Mind to Sink into the Heart


Published on Jun 3, 2014

In this video clip, Rupert discusses the timeless pause between two states, thoughts or perceptions

Make Time Your Ally by Deepak Chopra

All the happiness and fulfillment that humans yearn for exists in the present moment. In the now, time ceases to exist and we experience a presence that is all-absorbing, completely at peace, and totally satisfying. Nothing could be closer than the present, yet nothing slips away faster. In an instant, our mind can carry us far away into memories of the past or fantasies about the future. Or we may get caught up in a race against the clock, feeling like there’s never enough time. We say things like “Time is flying,” “Time is running out,” or “There are never enough hours in the day.”

We somehow forget that we can choose whether to make time an enemy or an ally. We can shift from time-bound awareness into timeless awareness . . . to the ecstasy that can only be found in the present moment. If you want to have all the time in the world, you can train yourself through the following simple practices:

Dive into the source of awareness. The most effective way to live in the flow of the timeless is meditation. As you meditate, over time your consciousness becomes awake within itself. The silent witness within saturates and illuminates the mind so that it does not look to the past or the future for fulfillment. It experiences peace and freedom within itself in every moment.

Try this: In a quiet place, close your eyes, take a deep breath, and go inward. Place your attention on your heart, in the center of your chest. Sit quietly and easily let your attention remain there. If it is pulled away by random thoughts, sensations in your body, or noises in your environment, re-center yourself as soon as you notice what has happened. After a few minutes, open your eyes. For the next half hour or so, observe yourself to see if you remain centered. Don’t instantly throw yourself into external demands.

Practice paying attention
. Throughout your day, when you notice that your thoughts have drifted away, come back to where you are. You’ll instantly see why you drifted away, whether because you were bored, anxious, dwelling on the past, or anticipating the future. Don’t judge yourself; simply return your attention to what’s in front of you right now.

Feel the sensations in your body.
While the mind lives in the past and the future, the body lives in the now. Connecting to the feelings in your body brings you back into present-moment awareness.

Do one thing at a time. Multitasking divides your attention and leads to confusion and weakened focus. When you focus on just one thing at a time, without rushing or procrastinating, you cultivate a sense of timeless awareness that creates feelings of calm and well-being.

Our thoughts are always pulling us into the future or the past, away from the present. But it is in the present moment that we find Spirit, our essential being and the force that animates all life. By connecting with the present we turn our attention inward, away from all the chaos and activity, and experience our eternal, unbounded nature.

About the Author

Deepak Chopra, M.D. is a best-selling author and the co-founder of the Chopra Center for Wellbeing in Carlsbad, California. The Chopra Center offers a variety of signature mind-body healing programs, online learning experiences, and retreats, including the Seduction of Spirit meditation and yoga retreat led by Deepak Chopra.

Website: http://www.chopra.com

~ Source: Origin Magazine ™

Transcending Time by Steve Taylor.

A few years ago a friend of mine was knocked off his motorbike at a high speed. The impact catapulted him through the air, and when he hit the ground he lost consciousness. The next thing he knew he woke up in hospital eight hours later. But he can still vividly remember the few moments before he lost consciousness:

I saw the car’s windscreen shattering. The glass sprayed out so slowly, like a fan, and it looked beautiful. All the pieces were shining in the sun. I felt like I was floating through the air, almost as if I wasn’t going to come down. I looked into the sun and it was like being on a plane, when you’re above the clouds and it’s a brilliant white colour.

It’s extremely common for accidents and other moments of sudden shock to bring an extreme slowing down of time. Here a person who regularly goes riding told me how she experiences a radically slowing down of time when she falls off her horse:

I am always surprised when I fall off a horse how long it takes me to hit the ground! I feel as if I am floating through the air and I always think that I am going to land really softly so I relax and wait to land. And then, when I hit the ground and am lying there winded, I am completely surprised.

The same slowing down of time often occurs in emergency situations, when our lives are threatened. There are many reports of time slowing down massively during earthquakes, for example. One woman who experienced the devastating earthquake in Armenia in 1988 reported that, “It was like a slow motion movie. There was a concrete panel slowly falling down.” The photographer Ansel Adams describes being woken up by an earthquake at 5am, with his bed crashing against the walls and windows smashing. “The roaring, swaying, moving, and grinding continued for what seemed like a long time,” he writes. “It actually took less than a minute.”

Many professional sportspeople are familiar with these kinds of experiences. Sometimes, in moments of high intensity, sportspeople find themselves entering the “zone”, a state in which everything “clicks” and they shift to a higher level of performance. New reserves of effort and energy are released inside them and they suddenly become capable of feats which would normally be beyond them. Without even trying very hard, everything they do seems naturally and inevitably perfect. Time moves much more slowly than normal – in fact, this is often the main reason why the player is capable of such astounding feats, because he or she has more time to play with, more time to anticipate his opponent’s actions and to position himself.

The American tennis champion Jimmy Connors, for example, describes how when he was in the “zone”, the ball seemed to grow in size as it came over the net, and moved so slowly that he had all the time in the world to choose how and when to hit it.
Immobilising the ego

The key to these experiences is the ego – or rather, the absence of the ego -during them. Our sense of time passing is a function of the ego. Young babies have no sense of ego, and therefore no sense of time passing. Young children only have a weak “ego structure” and so only have a vague sense of time. It’s only at the age of 16 or so – when the ego is fully developed as a structure – that we have a clear sense of the past or future and are able to accurately estimate periods of time.

This suggests that if the normal sense of ego was absent, we wouldn’t have a sense of time passing – or at least that if our sense of ego was weaker, our sense of time passing would be less pronounced, so that it would pass more slowly to us.

And this is exactly what happens in these experiences: for a short period, we lose our sense of ego, our sense of being an “I” trapped inside our heads – or at least this becomes much weaker than normal – and so we lose our normal sense of time passing. Our normal conscious mind is immobilised, and we cease to be subject to time (at least to the same extent).
Super-attention and shock

There are two ways in which the ego can be immobilised. The first is as a result of intense concentration or attention, which is what happens in sportsmen’s “zone” experiences. This can also happen in meditation, when we focus our attention on a mantra, or on our breathing. If we can keep our attention focused, we begin to experience a state of mental quietness. Our thoughts begin to slow down, until eventually (if we’re having a really successful meditation), they fade away altogether. And, at the same time, our normal sense of ego fades away. We experience a state of egolessness, of no longer being an “I” chattering away inside our heads. The act of concentrating our attention has the effect of dissolving the ego. This is why states of deep meditation also bring a sense of timelessness.

The super-attention which sports involve can also immobilise the ego. A golfer or racing driver concentrates hard for hours and, eventually, when he or she reaches a certain intense pitch of concentration, their normal sense of ego may fade away – and, as a consequence, so may their sense of time. A short distance athlete doesn’t need to keep her mind focused for as long during the actual event, of course, but she will aim to build up a state of intense “focusedness” for hours beforehand, ridding her mind of other thoughts and distractions.

The second way in which the ego can be immobilised is by sudden shocks. Teachers of Zen Buddhism try to catch the egos of students off guard by hitting them with sticks while they’re meditating, by giving them nonsensical answers to questions or by giving them koans (or riddles) to solve which make no sense at all, which the student can puzzle over for hours before his or her ego is finally immobilised by strain and confusion. It’s taken for granted that when the ego is immobilised, an experience of satori (or a higher state of consciousness) will result. And this is probably what happens in accidents and emergencies. The sheer shock of the car crash, the engine failure, the earthquake or the violent encounter, paralyses the ego. It all happens so quickly that it can’t react in time and gets left behind. As a result, with no (or at least very little) sense of ego, the person also experiences a sense of timelessness, or at least an acute slowing down of time.
Other egoless states

This connection between time and the ego also partly explains why psychedelic drugs can drastically slow down time. Drugs like LSD and magic mushrooms can, in Aldous Huxley’s words, “telescope aeons of blissful experience into one hour”. The Russian philosopher P D Ouspensky once made a series of “mystical experiments”, which probably (since he doesn’t state which drugs he used) involved inhaling ether. He experienced what he calls an “extraordinary lengthening of time, in which seconds seem to be years or decades”.

And part of the reason for this is that psychedelic drugs have an “ego subduing” effect. They often weaken our sense of being a separate I, complete with memories, beliefs and a self image, and we may feel that we’re fused with the world which normally seems outside us. (But sometimes the ego may be permanently damaged by this experience, which is one of the reasons why psychedelics can be so dangerous.)

Hypnosis can also have a time expanding effect. It’s difficult to say exactly what happens when a person becomes hypnotised, but it seems clear that the “shutting down” of the conscious mind or ego is the key aspect. When a hypnotist asks you to concentrate on his pocket watch or to listen to him counting to 20, what he’s trying to do is to paralyse your ego, to put it into abeyance, leaving you without your normal sense of identity and your own will. And in view of this, it’s natural that states of hypnosis can slow down time too.

The most striking evidence for the time slowing effect of hypnosis are the amazing feats people under hypnosis are capable of, which (like the amazing feats sportspeople perform in the “zone”) would be impossible in normal time, simply because there wouldn’t be enough “time” to do them. The psychologist Gordana Vitaliano gave hypnotised subjects a complex mathematical task to do, something that normally takes around 10 minutes, but which they completed in just 15 seconds.

In another experiment, a hypnotist slowed down his subjects’ sense of time by pretending to slow down a metronome which they were listening to, until they believed that it was only beating once every minute. He then told them they had an hour to accomplish certain mental tasks, such as planning a complicated meal. In reality, they were given just 10 seconds, but they fed back with the kind of wealth and detail of information which would only have been possible after an hour or so of normal time. In a similar experiment, a hypnotised woman produced several dress designs in less than a minute, saying afterwards that she felt like she had experienced an hour or more of normal time within that minute.
Spiritual development

All of these experiences show how bound up our sense of time is with the ego. As soon the ego is disturbed in some way, or put into abeyance, then time slows down radically or disappears altogether. This suggests that in a sense our experience of an evenly flowing linear time is a kind of illusion created by the ego. Children’s experience of time shows that it doesn’t exist before the sense of ego develops, and the experiences we’ve looked at here suggest that it doesn’t exist outside the ego, in the same way that the seeming reality of a dream ceases to exist the moment you wake up.

Most importantly, however, this suggests a way in which we can become free of time. Most of us feel that time is a kind of enemy. We feel that it’s running away from us and that we never have enough of it. We feel pressurised by its limits and deadliness. We spend so much time thinking about the future and the past that we forget to live in the present. But if time is created by the ego, then we can free ourselves from time permanently by “undoing” the ego. After all, this is the main aim of spiritual development. Through meditation, mindfulness, devotion, service and other spiritual practices, we slowly transcend the ego, and reorientate ourselves around a deeper spiritual self. In the process, the boundaries of time expand, like a river opening up to the ocean, until the illusion unravels completely, and we realise our true, timeless and eternal nature.

Consolations of the Forest : Alone in a Cabin the Middle Taiga » Sylvain Tesson

A meditation on escaping the chaos of modern life and rediscovering the luxury of solitude. Winner of the Prix Médicis for nonfiction, The Consolations of the Forest is a Thoreau-esque quest to find solace, taken to the extreme.

No stranger to inhospitable places, Sylvain Tesson exiles himself to a wooden cabin on Siberia’s Lake Baikal, a full day’s hike from any “neighbor,” with his thoughts, his books, a couple of dogs, and many bottles of vodka for company. Writing from February to July, he shares his deep appreciation for the harsh but beautiful land, the resilient men and women who populate it, and the bizarre and tragic history that has given Siberia an almost mythological place in the imagination.

Rich with observation, introspection, and the good humor necessary to laugh at his own folly, Tesson’s memoir is about the ultimate freedom of owning your own time. Only in the hands of a gifted storyteller can an experiment in isolation become an exceptional adventure accessible to all. By recording his impressions in the face of silence, his struggles in a hostile environment, his hopes, doubts, and moments of pure joy in communion with nature, Tesson makes a decidedly out-of-the-ordinary experience relatable. The awe and joy are contagious, and one comes away with the comforting knowledge that “as long as there is a cabin deep in the woods, nothing is completely lost.”

Sylvain Tesson
is a writer, journalist, and celebrated traveler. He has been exploring Central Asia—on foot, bicycle, and horse—since 1997. A best-seller in his native France, he is published all over the world—and now in the United States.

Click here to browse inside.

1. Contemplating the Nature of Experience 2. Time and Death ~ Rupert Spira


Introduction to Rupert’s teachings.

Time and Death

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