Category: Truth



Published on Apr 18, 2017

Tara Talks – Reflection: Living in Accord With Our Aspiration – with Tara Brach

If 90% of what we do is determined by feelings (and the other 10% by thinking aimed at rationalizing them)… which domain of feelings is in charge: fight/flight/freeze? Or deeper desires? This reflection helps us become more conscious of the driving forces in our daily lives.


Published on Apr 16, 2017

Finding your True Self, the Cure for all Suffering

Facing Your Inner Battles

The strength to face the challenges in our life always rewards us with a refinement and evolution of our soul regardless if we win or lose the battle.

We all strive to live our soul’s purpose, but sometimes our mind conflicts with our feelings and causes confusion. The Bhagavad Gita is an ancient Hindu text that has an important teaching for those of us who experience this internal struggle. In this story, Arjuna the peaceful warrior is faced with a choice to act or not act in what he feels is a no-win situation for himself. If you have ever felt confusion or inner conflict holding you back, then the timeless wisdom in this story can bring clarity and relief.

Ahimsa is the principle of non-violence, which is a fundamental tenet of Hinduism. It is rooted in the belief that all lives, both human and non-human, are sacred. This is why on the eve of a great war, the choice between duty and non-violence leaves Arjuna in a state of inner conflict in this story. Being a peaceful warrior requires you to stand firmly in your spiritual path, dharma, but sometimes we don’t have the clarity to know what the best choice is. This requires an active fearlessness and non-attachment, which is embodied in the famous parable of Arjuna and Krishna’s discussion on the battlefield.

Arjuna is faced with inner conflict about going into battle.

The story begins with a young prince, Arjuna, who realizes that the enemies he’ll be fighting in an upcoming battle are his own relatives, beloved friends, and revered teachers. He turns to his charioteer confessing his conflicting emotions and his fears. His charioteer is actually the eternally wise Krishna. Here Arjuna talks to Krishna about his confusion:

…it is not proper for us to kill our own kinsmen, the sons of Dhritarashtra. For how, Krishna, shall we be happy after killing our own relatives? If the sons of Dhritarashtra, weapon in hand, should kill me in battle, me weaponless and not defending myself, that would be better for me. – Bhagavad Gita

As he contemplates no action at all and allowing his enemies to kill him, he hopes to stay true to his dedication to non-violence (ahimsa), but Krishna recognizes this as a cop-out. Compassion is said to come in the form of a lamb and a lion. We must accept that we are not perfect. This humility allows each of us to evolve forward from the place that we stand, rather than jump to absolute ideals.

Compassion is said to come in the form of a lamb and a lion.


Though Arjuna has mentally justified that he is being fearless and selfless to let his enemies kill him unarmed, he is actually avoiding his own dharma and here Krishna reminds him of this:

One’s own duty, though defective, is better than another’s duty well performed. – Bhagavad Gita

This is a call to hone one’s own inner voice and stay true to it; trusting that there are no wrong choices, only lessons to be learned. Duty is usually associated with something we don’t want to do, but it can feel quite empowering once we accept our role in a situation. When I was in my 20s, I was passionate about the environment and saving the world, but I was broke. I had gone past being able to be picky about a job that would help me pay the bills or feed myself, so I begrudgingly took a job as a landscaper.

Swinging a pick-axe in the hot sun, I was given the task of putting irrigation lines in to grow plants and grass that should not have been planted in the arid climate of Arizona. Non-native, drought-tolerant plants waste precious water in the desert landscape. I was miserable while I worked and felt a bit self-righteous about my sustainability ideals. Angry at the universe that I should have to do such a lowly chore, I put my nose to the grindstone and woke up early every day to make ends meet.

We need to find the warrior within and face our own dharma. Photo by Robert Sturman.


If you have ever felt conflicted about your life path then you will understand this feeling. In acceptance of the task at hand comes a certain humility, self-compassion, a sense of service, mental liberation, and even empowerment. This is central to karma yoga, which teaches us not to be attached to the outcome of our work, but to do it as a form of devotion to our own inner evolution.

Your business is with action alone; not by any means with the fruit of action. Let not the fruit of action be your motive to action. Let not your attachment be fixed on inaction.Therefore, always perform action, which must be performed, without attachment. For a man, performing action without attachment attains the Supreme. – Krishna to Arjuna

Even the most mundane actions in our day-to-day life are the result of choices we have made. The parable of Arjuna’s indecision on the battlefield is an extreme expression of this common circumstance and that is why it holds such value for us today. With clarity of mind, or mindfulness, along with personal accountability and non-attachment to outcome, we can have the courage to face any battle. A situation can be terrifying and feel like life or death even if it is not. The strength to face the challenges in our life always rewards us with a refinement and evolution of our soul, regardless if we win or lose the battle.

Mindfulness gives us the power to face any daily battle. Image by Alberto Montt.

To one that is born, death is certain; and to one that dies, birth is certain. Therefore, you should not grieve about things that are unavoidable. – Krishna to Arjuna

Sometimes it is the fear itself that dies (or an ego death) on this journey. Each one of us is here at this time for something greater than we can know or understand. The world is filled with terrifying possibilities, and mistakes are easy to come by. Sometimes the fear of making the wrong choice is more scary than the choices themselves, yet we are all here to fail as much as we are here to succeed.

Anyone with great success can also boast many failures. In this process, we learn to be more compassionate to ourselves and to those who have wronged us with their own poor behavior. The journey of soul evolution continues regardless. We must always put one foot in front of the other, and the path will appear with each step.

In this path to final emancipation, nothing that is commenced becomes wasted effort; no obstacles exist; and even a little of this form of sacred duty protects one from great danger. – Krishna to Arjuna

Put one foot in front of the other and the path will appear.

Knowing that we are in line with our dharma, and on the path (not the right path or the wrong path, just on the path), we begin to liberate and empower ourselves. These ancient parables, like the one told in the Bhagavad Gita, are meant to remind us of the eternal challenges that humans face and how to conquer our demons, even if we’d rather do nothing. Arjuna contemplates not taking up arms in battle, but after speaking with Krishna he follows his dharma and fights.

Being a peaceful warrior does not mean that you should be without your sword, as you never know when you might be called to unsheathe it. You can stand fearlessly in whatever circumstance you may face, knowing that you are not alone on the journey to personal evolution.


Published on Mar 13, 2017

Gangaji speaks of the strong and flexible mind that neither indulges nor denies or fights the conditioning, triggers, habits of live. In simply being still, as very powerful waves of conditioning come to shore and wash back out, you are true to what has called you home, the truth of yourself.


Published on Feb 22, 2017

Getting Off the Hamster-Wheel of “Never Enough” – with Tara Brach (01/04/2017)

The first step is simply getting to know our habitual strategies for trying to feel better about ourselves. Then we can inquire: What really brings me happiness? This is taking refuge in presence.

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Modern humans have lost touch with their inner ‘true self’. Silence and stillness are a means to recovering happiness and contentment. In the modern world silence has practically ceased to exist.

The human race has stamped its authority over the planet Earth not just by covering its surface with concrete and destroying its plant and animal life, but also by burying the natural sounds of the Earth beneath a cacophony of man-made noise. We live our lives against the background of this cacophony, with the jagged mechanical sounds of urban-industrial society continually assaulting our ears: the roar of trucks, aeroplanes and trains, the clanging and thudding of machinery, the noise of building and renovating, the chatter of radios and TVs in other people’s cars and houses, and pop music blaring from every conceivable place.

But nothing, of course, has done more to obliterate silence than the car. In the modern world it’s very difficult to go anywhere where there’s no possibility of being disturbed by the sound of passing cars, and the only chance that city or town dwellers get to experience something of the quietness which existed everywhere in the pre-car world is sometimes on Sundays, when the mad rushing to and fro of modern life slows down. This quietness seems so foreign now that it seems difficult to believe that a hundred years ago and before it was everywhere all the time. Back then this quietness would even have filled the busiest city centres, which would have probably had a noise level equivalent to that of a modern small village.

There’s also more noise than ever before inside our houses. It’s unusual to go into a house nowadays where there isn’t at least one television set chattering away somewhere, even if the residents aren’t actually watching it, and other forms of home entertainment compete against TV to produce the most noise: radios, CD players, computer and video games etc. In fact the only sound which is largely absent from people’s houses nowadays is the voices of their occupants actually talking to one another.

Living in the midst of all this noise is bound to have a bad effect on us. All man-made noise is fundamentally disturbing. We find the sound of birds singing or of wind rushing through trees pleasing, but mechanical noise always jars and grates. And since we live our lives against a background of mechanical noise it follows that there’s always an undercurrent of agitation inside us, produced by the noise. This noise is certainly one of the reasons why modern life is so stressful as well. In modern life our senses are bombarded with massive amounts of external stimuli. Our fields of vision are always crowded with different (and constantly shifting) things, and our ears are bombarded with a bewildering variety of sounds — all of which clamour for our attention. Our senses have to absorb and process all this material, which takes up a lot of energy, and means that we’re liable to become drained of energy or ‘run down’ easily.

We can get out of this state by removing ourselves from all external stimuli and letting our energy-batteries naturally recharge themselves i.e., by relaxing. But there’s so much external stimuli around in the modern world and people are so unaccustomed to the absence of it that we may never be able relax properly, which could mean living in a permanently ‘run down’ state.

This lack of quietness has also meant is that people are no longer used to silence, and have even, as a result, become afraid of it. Along with inactivity, silence has become something which most people are determined to avoid at all costs, and which, when they are confronted with it, unnerves them. People have become so used to the frantic pace and the ceaseless activity of modern life that they feel uneasy when they’re left at a loose end with nothing to occupy their attention even for a few moments, and they feel equally uneasy when the noise they live their lives against the background of subsides. Why else is it that they need to have their radios and televisions chattering away in the background even when they’re not paying attention to them?

In other words, in the modern world silence has become an enemy. And this is a terrible shame, because in reality silence is one of our greatest friends, and can if it’s allowed to reveal itself to us have a powerfully beneficial effect on us.

Inner Noise

It’s not just the noise outside us which causes us problems, though, but also the noise inside us.

In the same way that the natural quietness and stillness of the world around us is always covered over with man-made noise, the natural quietness of our minds is constantly disturbed by the chattering of our ego-selves. This chattering fills our minds from the moment we wake up in the morning till the moment we go to sleep at night an endless stream of daydreams, memories, deliberations, worries, plans etc. which we have no control over and which even continues (in the form of dreams) when we fall asleep. This ‘inner noise’ has as many bad effects as the mechanical noise outside us. It actually creates problems in our lives, when we mull over tiny inconveniences or uncertainties which seem to become important just because we’re giving so much attention to them, and when we imagine all kinds of possible scenarios about future events instead of just taking them as they come. It means that we don’t live in the present, because we’re always either planning for and anticipating the future or remembering the past, “wandering about in times that do not belong to us and never thinking of the one that does” as Blaise Pascal wrote. And this constant inner chattering also means that we can never give our full attention to our surroundings and to the activities of our lives. Our attention is always partly taken up by the thoughts in our minds, so that wherever we are and whatever we’re doing we’re never completely there.

It’s probably possible to say that there’s also more of this ‘inner noise’ inside human beings than there’s ever been before. The hectic pace and the constant activity of our lives, the massive amount of external stimuli we’re bombarded with, and the barrage of information which the mass media sends our way, have made our minds more restless and active. We’ve got to juggle dozens of different problems and concerns in our minds just to get by from day to day, and every new thing we see or every new piece of information which is sent our way is potentially the beginning of a whole new train of thought to occupy our minds.

The True Self

Ultimately, the most serious consequence of both this inner chattering and the noise and activity of the modern world is that they separate us from our true selves.

Our ‘true self’ might be called the ground, or the essence, of our beings. It’s the pure consciousness inside us, the consciousness-in-itself which remains when we’re not actually conscious of anything. It’s what remains when our the activity of our senses and the activity of our minds cease. The sense-impressions we absorb from the world and the thoughts which run through our minds are like the images on a cinema screen, but our ‘true self’ is the cinema screen itself, which is still there even when there aren’t any images being projected on to it.

Experiencing this ‘consciousness-in-itself’ can have a massively therapeutic effect. It brings a sense of being firmly rooted in ourselves, of being truly who we are. We also have a sense of being truly where we are, realising that before we were only half-present, and everything we see around us seems intensely real and alive, as if our perceptions have become much more acute. But above all, we experience a profound sense of inner peace and natural happiness. As the Hindu and Buddhist traditions have always held, the nature of consciousness-in-itself (which means the consciousness inside us and the consciousness which pervades the whole universe) is bliss. Getting into contact with the pure consciousness inside us enables us, therefore, to experience this bliss. Indeed, it could be said that it’s only when we do this that we can experience true happiness. Usually what we think of as happiness is hedonistic or ego-based that is, based around pressing instinctive ‘pleasure buttons’ or around receiving attention and praise from others and increasing our self-esteem. But the kind of deep and rich happiness we experience when we’re in touch with the ground or essence of our beings is a natural, spiritual happiness, which doesn’t depend on anything external, and doesn’t vanish as soon as the thing which produced it is taken away. It’s a happiness which comes from experiencing the divine inside us and also the divine inside everything else, since the pure consciousness inside us is the same pure consciousness inside everything else, and the pure consciousness of the universe itself.

Making Contact with the True Self

Whether we’re in touch with this ‘true self’ or not depends on how much external stimuli our senses are taking in from the world around us, and on how much activity there is going on in our minds.

If there is a lot of noise, movement and activity taking place around us then we can’t help but give our attention to it; and in the same way, when there is a lot of ‘inner noise’ taking place we have to give our attention to that too. And when our attention is completely absorbed in this way either by external stimuli on their own, such as when we watch TV; by ‘inner noise’ on its own, such as when we daydream; or by both of them at the same time it’s impossible for us to be in contact with our ‘true self’ to any degree, in the same way that it’s impossible to see a cinema screen in itself when it’s full of dancing images. Being in contact with our ‘true self’ is a state of attentionless-ness, when our minds are completely empty.

What we have to do if we want to get into contact with this part of ourselves is, therefore, to withdraw our attention from these things. And this is, of course, what we do when we meditate: first of all, we remove ourselves from external stimuli, by sitting in a quiet room and closing our eyes. And then there’s only ‘inner noise’ standing between us and consciousness-in-itself, which we try to quieten by concentrating on a mantra or on our breathing. If we manage to stop the inner noise (and therefore stop our attention being absorbed in it) pure consciousness immerses us and we become our true selves.

And this brings us back to the most serious problem caused by the massive amount of external stimuli (including noise) which our senses are bombarded with in the modern world, and by the intensified ‘inner noise’ which modern life generates. It’s not just a question of completely closing yourself off to external stimuli and shutting down ‘inner noise’, so that you can experience a state of total immersion in pure consciousness. It’s possible to have a foot in both camps, so to speak; to live a normal life in the world, being exposed to external stimuli and experiencing inner noise, and at the same time still be rooted in your real self. That is, it’s possible to be partially immersed in consciousness-in-itself, and for your attention to be partially absorbed by external stimuli and inner talk. But this can only happen when there is just a moderate degree of both of the latter.

It would probably have been quite easy for our ancestors to live in this way, because they weren’t exposed to a great deal of external stimuli and because their lives were relatively slow-paced and stress-free, which would have meant that their attention needn’t have been completely absorbed by external stimuli and inner talk. Perhaps this even partly explains why native peoples seem to possess a natural contentment which modern city dwellers have lost because their more sedate lives mean that they’re able to be in touch with the ground of their being as they go about their lives, and that they can therefore continually experience something of the bliss of which is the nature of consciousness-in-itself.

For us, however, this has become very difficult. There’s always so much noise and activity both inside and outside us that our attention is always completely absorbed, so that we can’t be in contact with our real selves. We spend all our time living outside ourselves, lost in the external world of activity and stimuli or in the inner world of our own thoughts. We’re like a person who plans to go away for a few days but finds so much to occupy them in the place they go to that they never go home again, and never again experience the peace and contentment which lie there. This is certainly one of the reasons why so many people nowadays seem to live in a state of dissatisfaction — because they’ve lost touch with the natural happiness inside them. That natural happiness has been buried underneath a storm of external stimuli and what Meister Eckhart called ‘the storm of inward thought’.

As a result of this it’s essential for us, in the modern world, to go out of our way to cultivate silence ourselves. Circumstances may oblige us to live in cities, and our jobs may be stressful and demanding, but we’re still free to remove ourselves from external stimuli and to try to quieten our minds by meditating, going out into the countryside, or just by sitting quietly in our rooms. We don’t have to fill our free time with attention-absorbing distractions like TV and computer games, which take us even further away from ourselves. We should do the opposite: stop our attention being absorbed like this so that we can find ourselves again.

We need silence and stillness to become our true selves and to be truly happy. ‘Be still,’ said Jesus, ‘and know that I am God.’ But he might have added, ‘and know that you are God.’

Steve Taylor holds a Ph.D in Transpersonal Psychology and is a senior lecturer in Psychology at Leeds Metropolitan University, UK. For the last three years Steve has been included in Mind, Body, Spirit magazine’s list of the ‘100 most spiritually influential living people’ (coming in at #31 in 2014).

Steve is also the author of Back to Sanity: Healing the Madness of Our Minds and The Fall: The Insanity of the Ego in Human History and the Dawning of A New Era. His books have been published in 16 languages and his research has appeared in The Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, The Journal of Consciousness Studies, The Transpersonal Psychology Review, The International Journal of Transpersonal Studies, as well as the popular media in the UK, including on BBC World TV, The Guardian, and The Independent.

If we are fully present, there are no thoughts. If there are no thoughts, then quite literally, there is no time. There is no life outside of this moment. We can no longer function in the world of time, because there is only now. You would need a team of caretakers to take care of you, or an ashram would have to develop around you to take care of you and receive your enlightened utterances.

One such example is Ramana Maharshi. When Ramana awakened, he did not participate in the world of time. He remained in the silence and an ashram developed around him. That is the beauty of India. The Indian culture allows for one to enter into that fully awakened state and remain there. They know how to respond to one who is fully awakened.

But it is time for many more of us to awaken. Enlightenment can no longer be for just a select few, who do not participate in the world. If there is to be an awakening at a collective level, we will have to find a balance between the timelessness of the fully awakened state and the world of time. This means that we must master the art of moving easily between those two dimensions.

To do so, we must know that the present moment is the truth of life. We must know that everything outside of this moment is illusory in nature and so we no longer believe in any of it as true. We must recognize that life at the level of mind is simply play. It is sometimes happy and sometimes sad, because it is a world of duality. We relax and accept the dual nature of life within time. We are no longer for or against anything. We have transcended judgment. Life is accepted fully and so too is death. Joy is accepted fully and so too is pain. But we are so deeply grounded in the moment of now, that we no longer get caught in the movements of the mind and its world of thought and emotion. We are no longer identified with the story unfolding within the world of time. We are no longer defined by that story. We are deeply grounded in Oneness. We can move easily into time and the world of thought, and we are able to return to silence and Presence at will. In fact, silence and Presence are always there as the foundation of our existence, even when we consciously choose to venture into the world of the mind.

These days we are seeing all around us a lot of turbulence, inner and outer…The tendency when we get stirred up – and this is for all humans – is to go into a kind of habitual “jungle mentality,” also known as our stress reflex. We get anxious or upset and we try to sense where we can throw blame for what’s wrong. There is a polarizing.

Mostly what we are doing when we are in stress-reactivity is trying to find certainty. We are trying to find some ground again; and everything we try to do then is, on some level, trying to frame things so we have a stable ground – something that allows us to say, “Oh, here is what’s going on!” We try to define it, as a means of regaining a sense of certainty and security – an illusion of control. Charles Eisenstein calls this place “the space between stories.” And if we grab on to the next story and act from that, then we don’t wake up.

Now, we need to act, always; we need to act in our families to take care of our loved ones, and we need to act at work, and we need to act in terms of our social consciousness to move towards healing and change. The big question is this: From what consciousness are we acting?

We want to really watch this, because there’s such a tendency to act from habitual old states of mind where we perceive hatred (for example) and we respond to it with blame, aversion and hatred of our own. So: do we want to keep the whole game on the same level? Do we want to keep re-arranging the furniture on the decks of the Titanic? Or do we want to have a real paradigm shift and wake up consciousness? How can we really bring a presence to what is going on between the stories, so we can see the future we really long for – with awareness, with love, with justice? It is how we are now that will seed the future.

Action needs to come from a more evolved consciousness; and mindfulness & compassion training is what evolves the brain. If we don’t know how to pause and deepen attention in the space between stories, we won’t connect with the very presence and compassion that can inform intelligent action. We need to pause, and be able to feel what is here. That’s not so easy – which is why we have to train in it!

For a long time I have heard the story about Gandhi, who was known to take a day each week for prayer and meditation. He said, “I need to make sure that my actions come from the deepest, most awake part of my Being.” In these turbulent times… can we give ourselves some true pauses each day to come home to our hearts?

From: Play a Greater Part – Bodhisattva for our Times – Part 1
a talk given by Tara Brach on November 16, 2016
Source: Tar Brach


Published on Feb 8, 2017

Sruti is a spiritual teacher who writes about finding God within an experience with an uncommon and painful illness called Interstitial Cystitis. She has been interviewed on the Buddha at the Gas Pump talk show on YouTube about her experience of spiritual awakening in the midst of intense pain: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atG0z…

This ongoing and chronic condition challenged her to stay present with daily pain and to look further inward for answers. In an extreme moment of pain, in which consciousness began to fade, Sruti experienced the erasure of all that clouds over the earliest source of vision.

She watched as one by one the layers of the mind, the body and feelings disappeared before her. She asks the question: Who is the One that Can Never Leave You? With whose vision are we seeing when the lights are going out? Has this early vision ever known anything at all?

Sruti’s book, The Hidden Value of Not Knowing, is available as an audiobook and an eBook online at Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B01IBZFPIM
The book can also be ordered in print form: http://www.blurb.com/b/7133487-the-hi…


Published on Feb 3, 2017

A meditation on the knowledge ‘I Am’ as being God’s presence shining in each of us. ‘I Am’ is seen as the highest meditation and following the ‘I’ or the ‘I Am’ is the golden thread to our own essential being.

From the Seven Day retreat at Buckland Hall, 20 November 2016

Q: In your recent blog post, “Playing 3-d Chess with the Absolute” , you have written about “authentic individuality” or soul… I want to know whether by “soul” you mean that which takes rebirth. This is normally not talked about in non-duality, where it is stated that there is no self.

A: Thanks for your very good question. In many teachings of Advaita or non-duality, there is a strong emphasis on the absolute truth. Reality is considered to be that which is unchanging and which never comes or goes. That way of pointing is useful and powerful in pointing awareness beyond appearances and beyond all that does come and go like souls, bodies, objects, thoughts, etc.

I tend to point with a more relative definition of reality. I would suggest that how long something lasts is an indicator of how real or how true it is. So a thought that lasts at most a few seconds is not very real. A body or incarnation is more real. And a soul that lasts through many incarnations is even more real. But all of these are still appearances that come and go within the ultimate reality that cannot be named or described. So they are real, but not as real as the absolute substratum of existence that does not come or go.

A nice metaphor is the ocean. The depths of the ocean are relatively still and unchanging, while up on the surface there are lots of waves that come and go. In my way of seeing, the waves do exist, but only for as long as they are individually happening. However, when you are being tossed to and fro by the waves, there is no question that they do exist, just as when you have taken birth as a body, there is little question whether that body exists for you. And also there is no question that when the waves subside or the body dies, that they no longer exist.

The soul is like the deeper currents that are also moving and changing and yet have a tremendous effect on the appearance of many waves. These currents persist for a much longer time than any individual wave, and can generate many different waves over time. These currents would have much more effect on our journey than any individual wave. And for those who can sense it, there is no question that the soul still exists when the body dies, just as the currents still exist when the waves subside.

Eventually all currents and all waves subside back into the stillness of the deepest water. And surprisingly, the depths are the most intense and powerful level of the ocean of Being that has the most profound effect on our consciousness. Sensing the depths and vastness of the ocean can put the entire journey into perspective and allow us to see that it is all one beautiful play of splashing, flowing water. Since we as souls are also made of that same water, nothing can harm us or do any damage to our eternal nature.

All of these levels or depths exist simultaneously, and they are all one ocean. The biggest truth is that they are all made up of water, but the smaller truths of currents and waves appear within that one vast body of water. The appearance of waves does not contradict the vastness of the ocean, and the existence of the infinite stillness at the depths does not contradict the arising of the currents and waves. These different levels of truth are all true simultaneously, and they are not separate from each other. The currents and waves exist within the eternal ocean of Being.

A good question is what level of truth is functional or useful in this moment. For discriminating how to steer a boat on the surface moment to moment, being extremely aware of each wave is useful and can even keep your boat from capsizing! For navigating across wide stretches of ocean, then understanding and appreciating the deeper currents becomes useful and functional. And for putting it all in perspective and touching the depths of your Being, then it is appropriate to sense beyond appearances and form to the underlying reality of the infinite ocean of water itself. The flexibility to shift awareness between these different levels of reality allows the most appropriate response in each and every moment to the ever-changing and yet also eternally unchanging experience of the ocean of Being. There is no right or wrong level of truth, there are just all of the different experiences of water here for us to explore. Both the depths and the surface are wet, and they both can be refreshing and rich to play in.

I hope this is helpful.

Source: endless Satsang

Published on Jan 29, 2017

Also see https://batgap.com/shantimayi/

ShantiMayi has been, what she calls ‘mirroring’ … for well over two decades. American born, living in France and India, she has traveled the world to remind those who are remembering, who wonder and are drawn by their heart to the ancient wisdom of Self Realization.

She had the rare and unusual opportunity to sequester herself for many years in India at the feet of her Master. There she learned, unlearned and experienced directly, her Master’s directives. In that awe inspiring atmosphere, her work had its inception and has gone full throttle ever since. She carries the Sacha Linage to the world and does not consider herself a Hindu. Yet, she grew in awareness, love and wisdom in the rich and fertile furrows of India’s venerable spiritual heritage.

Websites: http://wanderingstarrs.com http://shantimayi.com

Book: In Our Hearts We Know

Published on Jan 26, 2017

Refuge in Truth, Love and Awareness – with Tara Brach (01/04/2017)

The three archetypal refuges of truth, love and awareness are interweaving pathways home found in most spiritual traditions. This talk looks at our habitual pursuit of substitutes to feel happy, and reflects on how we awaken through each true refuge. The talk ends with a living ritual anyone can participate in that helps us remember these refuges as we move through our lives.

Audio: https://www.tarabrach.com/refuge-trut…

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An interview with Anodea Judith, Ph.D.: We are entering a time when every environmental system on the planet is stressed. Some people fear that we won’t make it as a species. Others are in denial about the gravity of our situation.

How do you see our species and its relationship to the Earth?

I look at the current state of our global situation through the long view of evolutionary history. I see the progression of the human story as corresponding to developmental stages of childhood, from our primal infancy, to the cradle of civilization, through 5000 years of sibling rivalry, to emerge in the present time in the tumultuous throes of adolescence. This means we are undergoing an rite of passage that will take us into our young adulthood.

Children are dependent, adolescents are independent, and adults are inter-dependent. So our adulthood means that we come to an understanding of our interdependent partnership with Nature. In this mature relationship we are neither hapless victims nor dominators, but co-creators with the natural world.

If we are entering a rite of passage, who is initiating us?

The problems in our world can be seen as the initiating factors that are forcing us to change in order to survive: global warming, ecological destruction, social injustice, warfare, terrorism, peak oil, natural disasters, epidemic disease – the entire litany of modern challenges are actually part of our initiation rite. These problems are the change agents or evolutionary drivers that push us into a new way of living on this planet. Like many initiations, the challenge is to transform or die. This is the challenge that faces us as a species. Our current way of life will bring death to countless species and ecosystems, including a great many humans.

That’s a pretty heavy statement. Is it really that bleak?

Yes, and no. Yes, in the sense that we cannot continue indefinitely in the direction we are now going – with our whole economy based on consumption and unacknowledged waste, without putting anything back. As population expands, this practice becomes ever more pronounced. The problems we see now: climate change, pollution, illness and poverty – will only increase. Right now 20% of the world’s population lacks access to safe drinking water. If we do not change our ways, that figure could go up to two-thirds of the world populaton by 2025. If global warming continues, up to 50 million Americans could become environmental refugees, and that is small compared to the impact in the rest of the world.

And no, it’s not that bleak because society is already beginning to turn things around. We are developing alternatives to fossil fuels, such as wind and solar, that provide more sustainable sources, and these sources could provide all our needs if we learn to conserve. We are finally creating hybrid cars that get better gas mileage, and that technology is capable of even more. Lester Brown of Worldwatch Institute claims that hybrids could lower our use of fossil fuels by 85% if they were used widely enough.

We are learning about organic farming with a higher demand placed on natural foods and buying locally, such as shopping at farmer’s markets, which is one of the fastest growing commercial markets in the U.S. There is a huge outcry about global warming now, thanks to Al Gore’s latest movie, and that will galvanize global cooperation like nothing ever has, because we will have a common “problem” that isn’t an enemy to kill, but a situation to solve.

Furthermore, for two-thirds of the cost of the Iraq War, most of the major environmental problems in the world could be solved: soil depletion, deforestation, water pollution, ozone, world hunger, air pollution. We have the technology, and we obviously have the money, we just don’t the political will – or quite enough collective will – to make it happen.

How did we get to such a place where we came to live so alienated from Nature?

If we look at the story of our kind as a progression from birth to adulthood, our beginnings emerged from the primal womb of the natural world. In our earliest infancy, Nature was our universal mother, who nourished us on her abundant breast. As we grew up through our childhood, we rebelled against Nature – asserting our own independence in every way that we could. All worship of the “mother” and the Pagan Nature deities was strictly forbidden in Christian times, along with denigrating the body and earth as “unclean.”

Through science we came to understand Nature, not as a living field in which we were embedded, but as an inanimate “it” that we could control and exploit. That understanding led to our Industrial Revolution and the technology that has both solved and created many problems in our world today. Our initial rebellion from Mother Nature has now led to a dissociation which has brought us up against the perils of human nature.

So from the primal thesis of the natural world, to its antithesis in the “man-made” world, we are now ready for a new and higher synthesis of the two – a balanced relationship of mutual interdependence. This can create a beautiful and sustainable world in which our technology is in harmony with rather than at odds against the natural world. It is not that technology is bad – it has given us the immeasurable gifts – it’s just that it is not in alignment with the natural world. Once that happens, there’s no limit to what we can achieve. But without that alignment, Nature will pose the limits, and we are coming up against them now.

I see our initiation as moving from an adolescent age whose ruling principle is the love of power to a more mature and sustainable civilization organized by the power of love. The imperial model that society currently holds is one of domination, and the social organization of this power is based on a pyramid, with one man on top and power trickling down to a mass of slaves. The model of the heart is one of relationship, where every aspect of the living web is regarded as equally sacred. The new paradigm is ruled by an ecosystem rather than an egosystem, by a web of connection rather than a chain of command. And even as we cover the earth with the internet, the biosphere is still the most complex and elegant web of connection we have on this planet – something that pre-dated humans by billions of years.

What can the average person, who is embedded in this culture, do to live in greater harmony with the Earth?

Each of us has a choice in every moment to honor our relationship with the Earth. We have this choice in what we buy, what we eat, what we wear, where we live, and how we drive. This choice is simultaneously personal and political.

On a personal level, there are many ways to minimize the distance between yourself and the natural world. Choose food with less packaging, less chemical processing, and less trucking. (The average item in a grocery store travels over a thousand miles to get there).

Find ways to experience Nature directly so as to reset the dials on your nervous system, which were, after all, designed to respond to the colors, smells, and visions of the natural world. This can be done by taking trips to the wilderness, riding your bike, or walking whenever possible. This is especially important for children, who now spend most of their time indoors, without developing this important relationship.

You can conserve energy (and money) by using energy efficient light bulbs, and turning out the lights diligently when they’re not needed. In terms of carbon emissions, buy a hybrid car if you can afford it. If not, go on the web and see how you can offset your carbon imprint by making a donation to organizations that are fighting global warming. (see http://www.carbonfund.org)

On a more political level, there are countless organizations that have arisen to protect the environment. (for a good listing go to: http://www.webdirectory.com or http://www.ecologicalinternet.org.) Offer your support to the organizations that are already doing the work. Many of them work on a shoestring budget with volunteer labor. Give them money or volunteer your time or help them get their message out. See what needs protection in your own local area. You can have your long distance phone bills go through Working Assets, which donates part of its money to social and environmental organizations.

Make a point to find out about your politicians’ voting records, and support those candidates that seem to understand what’s at stake. The League of Conservation Voters has a scorecard you can look up on the Internet for the voting records of your representatives.

Most important is that we speak to everyone we can and help them to wake up to both the perils and the possibilities of our situation. Ask stores and restaurants if they recycle. Complain about excess packaging and bring your own bags to the market. Tell your grocery stores you want more organic food. Write your representatives. Talk to your neighbors and to those you meet on buses and trains. Call into talk shows, write letters to the editor of your local paper. Become informed, and then share that information widely.

Do you see Gaia as a living being, and if so what are the implications of such a belief?

I have always seen the Earth and its biosphere as one indivisible whole that is living and sentient. The entire planet has a consciousness that is evolving, and we are part of that evolution. This is supported by science in the way the planet regulates temperature, ocean salinity, and oxygen balance in a highly complex system. This is hard for many people to comprehend in the same way that fleas do not know they are on an elephant.

The first implication of this is that we are all cells of one body, which supports the idea that we are all connected, or all one. But even more, if we view this living being as having an intelligence – just the way our bodies have an intelligence that knows how to heal, digest, and breathe—then we can be guided by that intelligence in all that we do – as part of Gaia, not separate from the Earth. We can regard nature as a very sentient “thou,” that is literally our collective body. We know that if the body is sick, our emotional and mental states suffer as well. Likewise, if the environment is afflicted, then the health of our whole society suffers.

If we attribute such consciousness to our environment, we are more likely to see it as sacred. It becomes something that gives us guidance and spiritual sustenance, in the same way that churches do for many people. A redwood grove is the perfect cathedral for me!Earlier you indicated that when we reach a level of maturity as a species we will live in “balanced partnership with Nature”. What do you think about the notion that we are walking hand-in-hand with the planet down a path that will lead ultimately to the survival of the planet and the distinction of the human species among others? That, in fact, once we are gone, Gaia will simply evolve other forms of life. That it’s not about saving the planet, it’s about saving ourselves.

It’s very true that Gaia can survive without humans but humans cannot survive without a functioning biosphere. But I don’t see it as an either/or situation where we save the planet or ourselves, but that we come to an understanding that they are inseparably intertwined. To do environmental work merely for the purpose of saving ourselves is to miss the point that we are part of a grand experiment in co-evolution, and we have just gotten to the point in that evolution where we can be aware of it and enter the relationship consciously.

It is through our species that Gaia could see Herself – through the first moon landing that beamed back a picture of the Earth floating in space. This was a monumental evolutionary moment in the progression from cooling lava 5 billion years ago to the first self-reflective consciousness. We certainly could go the way of the dinosaurs and become extinct, and Gaia would recover with new life forms to follow. If it took 10,000 years to recover from humans, that’s nothing in geologic time.

Humans are just the latest model in the evolutionary experiment, but not the last. However, we are the first species capable of having such a huge impact on the planet, but even more important, we are the first species capable of understanding that impact and consciously doing something about it. And if we can get that lesson and act accordingly, we just may get to stick around and see what happens!


Judith, Ph.D. is worldwide workshop presenter, and the author of many books. Her latest, “WAKING THE GLOBAL HEART: HUMANITY’S RITE OF PASSAGE FROM THE LOVE OF POWER TO THE POWER OF LOVE”. Her previous works in include: WHEELS OF LIFE, EASTERN BODY-WESTERN MIND, and the award winning video, THE ILLUMINATED CHAKRAS.
Source: AWAKEN


Has the modern scientific world robbed our lives of a deeper sense of meaning and purpose? Has science rendered God irrelevant? Or can science actually bring us towards a deeper spiritual understanding and a greater sense of joy in our daily lives?

Space scientist and physicist Anthony Mannucci explores these questions from a unique point of view. He begins by stating the obvious: everyone wants a sense of purpose and meaning to their lives. How to achieve it? Dr. Mannucci’s narrative takes us down a path where science is a starting point for something deeper. He reveals an Absolute Truth that is central to science and to our nature as spiritual beings. Dr. Mannucci expertly explains the power and the limitations of science. He reveals that science and spirituality are not distant cousins but in fact share a bond.

What follows is an exploration of mind, and how exploring the nature of mind leads us to a deeper appreciation of our spiritual nature. Dr. Mannucci shows how the right words and ideas can change your life. In concluding the book, Dr. Mannucci discusses the importance of mystery and awe, two emotions familiar to every scientist. You will find the ideas in this book original and refreshing, conveying a message of hope and joy. Those who embrace these words will not regret their decision.

Dr. Anthony J. Mannucci is a NASA space physicist who has devoted his life to unraveling the secrets of our larger world and increasing the knowledge of humanity.

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