Category: Truth


Life without a reason, a purpose, a position… the mind is frightened of this because then “my life” is over with, and life lives itself and moves from itself in a totally different dimension. This way of living is just life moving. That’s all.

As soon as the mind pulls out an agenda and decides what needs to change, that’s unreality. Life doesn’t need to decide who’s right and who’s wrong. Life doesn’t need to know the “right” way to go because it’s going there anyway. Then you start to get a hint of why the mind, in a deep sense of liberation, tends to get very quiet. It doesn’t have its job anymore. It has its usefulness, but it doesn’t have its full-time occupation of sustaining an intricately fabricated house of cards.

This stillness of awareness is all there is. It’s all one. This awareness and life are one thing, one movement, one happening, in this moment — unfolding without reason, without goal, without direction. The ultimate state is ever present and always now. The only thing that makes it difficult to find that state and remain in that state is people wanting to retain their position in space and time. “I want to know where I’m going. I want to know if I’ve arrived. I want to know who to love and hate. I want to know. I don’t really want to be; I want to know. Isn’t enlightenment the ultimate state of knowing?” No. It’s the ultimate state of being. The price is knowing.

This is the beautiful thing about the truth: ever-present, always here, totally free, given freely. It’s already there. That which is ever-presently awake is free, free for the “being.” But the only way that there’s total and final absolute homecoming is when the humanness presents itself with the same unconditionality. Every time a human being touches into that unconditionality, it’s such peace and fulfillment.

In your humanity, there’s the natural expression of joy and love and compassion and caring and total unattachment. Those qualities instantly transmute into humanness when you touch into emptiness. Emptiness becomes love. That’s the human experience of emptiness, that source, that ever-present awakeness. For the humanness to lay itself down — your mind, your body, your hopes, your dreams, everything — to lay itself down in the same unconditional manner in which awareness is ever present, only then is there the direct experience of unity, that you and the highest truth are really one thing. It expresses itself through your humanity, through openness, through love. The divine becomes human and the human becomes divine — not in any “high and mighty” sense, but just in the sense of reality. That’s the way it is.

The only price is all of our positions. The only price is that you stop paying a price.

Source: The Only Price – Adyashanti

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Published on Jan 11, 2018

Eckhart Tolle talks about the importance of doing one thing at a time!

For years I struggled to find the peace I really wanted.

You know the dream:

Happiness

Not overthinking

No anxiety

Physically fit

And the to live every moment without being distracted by the past or the future.

During that time, I lived with anxiety, insomnia and way too much useless thinking going on in my head. It was never easy.

One of the reasons I was never truly at peace was because of one recurring problem: I couldn’t learn to “accept” where I was without wishing it were different.

Because avoiding and fighting against what is happening inside you only makes it worse.

Unfortunately, acceptance is also really hard to cultivate. We’re practically wired to not accept the moment if it’s not 100% comfortable.

So, what can we do?

What helped me was coming across Japanese Buddhist master Miyamoto Mushashi’s 21 rules of life.

Known as Japan’s greatest ever swordsman, he wrote these 21 rules 2 weeks before his death.

Each rule teaches you to accept your circumstances in life, detach from outside forces you can’t control and be comfortable with who you are.

I find these rules powerful because the only way to cultivate acceptance is through continued practice in your actions and your attitude. The two things we actually have control over.

And these rules give you the necessary guidelines to do just that.

It might take months to rewire your brain, but it’s well worth it.

Check them out:

1) Accept everything just the way it is.
Acceptance is perhaps the most important attitude to overcome mental challenges in life.

It’s a state of mind. There’s no destination or goal with acceptance. It’s simply the process of exercising the mind to be tolerant of anything life throws at us.

Why is it powerful?

Because instead of fighting against negative emotions like anxiety and stress, you’re actually accepting them the way they are. You’re not bitter, and you’re not creating more negativity out of your negativity.

Through acceptance you pave the path for negative emotions like anxiety to become less powerful. You’re not fighting against them and making them worse.

But to be clear: Acceptance is not the following: It’s not indifference or apathy. It does not involve giving up or not trying. It’s simply about accepting things without judging them.

It is what it is. Whatever happens happens. It’s about being patient and allowing the natural flow of things to take place.

2) Do not seek pleasure for its own sake.
As humans, we’re unhappiest when we become dissatisfied with what we have, and decide that we want more.

When we seek pleasure for pleasure’s sake, we put ourselves in an endless loop of desiring that’s only temporarily satisfied when we experience that pleasure.

But feelings don’t last forever. And before you know it, you’ll be back desiring again.

This doesn’t mean you can’t have fun and enjoy pleasure when you experience it. It just means you won’t be constantly seeking pleasure for its own sake. You appreciate what you have in every moment, and sometimes that will be pleasurable emotions.

But you also won’t be unhappy when you aren’t experiencing pleasure.

3) Do not, under any circumstances, depend on a partial feeling.
Same as above, feelings don’t last forever. Emotions are transient. You won’t be happy all the time, and wanting to be so will only make you unhappy.

4) Think lightly of yourself and deeply of the world.
When you think of yourself too much, you amplify your ego and your insecurities.

Happy people are the ones who focus on helping others. There’s a beautiful Chinese Proverb which describes this perfectly:

“If you want happiness for an hour, take a nap. If you want happiness for a day, go fishing. If you want happiness for a year, inherit a fortune. If you want happiness for a lifetime, help somebody.”

In other words: Be humble, don’t take yourself too seriously and focus on helping others.

5) Be detached from desire your whole life long.
Buddhism says that desiring leads to suffering. Why? Because when you’re desiring, you’re dissatisfied with what you have right now.

And when you get what you want, this leads you down an endless loop of desiring.

If you can forget about the idea of wanting, you can learn to be comfortable and grateful for what you have right now, which is key to inner peace.

6) Do not regret what you have done.
Regret is a useless emotion, isn’t it? You can’t change what’s happened. Yes, you can learn from what happened, but that doesn’t involve experiencing regret.

I know that sometimes we can’t help but regret things in life, but it’s important not to dwell on it. It’s useless to do so.

7) Never be jealous.
Another useless emotion. It also means you’re insecure with yourself, because you’re envious of someone else.

Instead, look inside yourself and be grateful for who you are and what you have.

8) Never let yourself be saddened by separation.
It sucks to separate from someone you want to be with. But getting sad over it won’t help you or them.

Sometimes you just need to toughen up and appreciate what you have, not what you lose.

9) Resentment and complaint are appropriate neither for oneself nor others.
Again, complaining without action doesn’t help you achieve anything. It only serves to raise your toxic energy.

And don’t let what other people do affect you as well. You’re not in control of what they do. But you are in control of how you react to what they do.

10) Do not let yourself be guided by the feeling of lust or love.
This one’s probably a controversial one for many. For me, too. I think we can all agree that you don’t want to be guided by lust. It’s similar to chasing emotions that don’t last forever and will only give you temporary fulfilment.

Love, however, is a different story. I don’t know about you, but I think that love is one of the most important emotions to be guided by. Your family is everything, whoever they are, and your life is much more fulfilled when you do whatever you can for them.

11) In all things have no preferences.
Similar to desiring, by having preferences, you’re not happy with what you have right now. You’re dissatisfied and unable to enjoy the present moment.

So if you can, try not to prefer something over something else, especially if you can’t control it.

12) Be indifferent to where you live.
If you can change where you live, then by all means go ahead. And don’t stop looking for opportunities to do so.

But besides doing that, it’s more fulfilling to appreciate where you are right now, rather than wishing it were different.

13) Do not pursue the taste of good food.
Interesting one. Focus on eating to be healthy and for nourishment. Desiring delicious food can lead to addiction and attachment. This goes for alcohol and drugs, too.

14) Do not hold onto possessions you no longer need.
It’s easy to get cluttered with junk that you don’t need. But if it’s not benefiting your life, get rid of it. More space and clear thinking is what’s needed. Not more stuff.

15) Do not act following customary beliefs.
Follow your own common sense. Do what makes sense to your own values, not what other people think. Decide for yourself.

You know what’s right and wrong. You don’t need someone else to tell you.

16) Do not collect weapons or practice with weapons beyond what is useful.
A tribute to his swordsman time, but we can apply this for our lives, too. It’s better to be an expert in one thing, than okay at everything.

17) Do not fear death.
Extremely hard to do. But it’s something none of us will escape. We can either learn to accept that our own and our close one’s time will eventually come, or fight against it causing anxiety and sadness for the rest of our lives.

18) Do not seek to possess either goods or fiefs for your old age.
What good will they do you when you’re gone? Only collect what is useful. Don’t waste your time.

19) Respect Buddha and the Gods without counting on their help.
Take responsibility for yourself. Don’t count on luck or god to pull you through. Tackle the endeavors you know are within your capabilities. Keep doing the right thing and everything else will fall into place.

20) You may abandon your own body but you must preserve your honor.
Don’t do anything that you won’t be able to live with for the rest of your life. Your actions define you, not your beliefs.

21) Never stray from the way.
Stay humble, do the right thing and always keep learning and growing.

Looking to reduce stress and live a calmer, more focused life? Mindfulness is the easy way to gently let go of stress and be in the moment. It has fast become the slow way to manage the modern world – without chanting mantras or finding hours of special time to meditate.


The enlightenment teachings of Leonard Jacobson

The truth is known in silence

Published on Jan 12, 2018

Tara Brach: Winds of Homecoming ~ 

2018/01/11

The Buddha taught that we live our lives on the tip of intention, it is the seed of our future. This talk explores the difference between “limbic” intentions driven by grasping or fear, and intentions that are the call of our awakening heart. You will learn how to identify and shift from a “limbic” to wise intention, and several different ways you can more readily and regularly access your deepest aspiration.

Published on Jan 8, 2018

Three Gateways to Peace and Freedom with Tara Brach (01/03/2018)

This talk explores the three archetypal refuges of truth, love and awareness. We look at the outer and inner aspects of each refuge, and then through guided reflections and a Refuge Ritual, deepen our commitment to the pathways that awaken our minds and free our hearts.

Published on Dec 23, 2017

Why am I suffering? Why do we suffer so much in life? This video will change the way you think about suffering and after watching this video you’ll probably stop complaining about your pain and suffering! Simple and life changing advice from the great enlightened saint Sri Anandamayi Ma.

Published on Dec 7, 2017

J. Krishnamurti – What Is Common Among All of Us?


All good things must come to an end, as they say, and writing my Salon is no exception to that. I’ve been writing this monthly Salon for more than ten years now and it has been a pleasure to share ideas and guidance with all of you. Now I find that my time and energy is drawn more to developing my online courses, most especially in Spiritual Direction. I will write Newsletters instead of Salons, although they may not come out on a monthly basis.

That said, I’ve given a great deal of thought to what I should say in my last Salon. I decided to end by offering you a list of my “greatest spiritual truths” – how’s that? These are the teachings I hold most dear to my heart and I hope they will serve you as much as they do me:

1. Miracles are real.
However, don’t expect a miracle to do something you can or should do for yourself. Miracles are not for cowards but for brave and courageous people who are filled with an unrelenting faith in the Divinely possible. Anything and everything is possible with God. Lazy, complaining people never experience miracles. People filled with hope who never give up trying or believing no matter the odds are prime candidates for Divine intervention.

2. Kindness and patience matter at all times.

3. Believing you are extraordinary – or that your kids are – is an unnecessary suffering in life.
Of course your children are special to you – but they aren’t to the rest of the world. You were not born to be extraordinary. No one was. Just step up to the challenges that life presents to you and do your best. Doing something extraordinary for others – now that’s a worthy goal.

4. Stop searching for God, for purpose and for meaning.
If you haven’t found it by now, you should ask yourself, “What the heck am I looking for? Is it attention? Is it success?” God is in the small details of your life, not in how others see you or in big opportunities. The Divine works behind the scenes, not in front of the camera. At the same time, every function of nature is a testimony to the order of the Divine: The laws of Nature mirror the nature of God. Learn the Tao. Learn to live according to the laws of balance. God is balance. God is cosmic law and order. You are the engine of meaning and purpose. Those forces will never show up at your door. Either you generate them or you don’t. You can make anything meaningful. Meaning comes from how you value something. Nothing has meaning or purpose until you are able to generate those graces from within.

5. Look for something special in each day – something new.
Don’t assume that this something new is going to change your life or do something for you. That something new could be that you notice how much a flower has opened up since the day before; yet, in noticing something so ordinary, you realize the elegance with which life carries on. Life is constantly growing, moving – alive. Life is everywhere. This planet is a huge, alive Being. We are walking and living and sleeping on a huge living creature that provides food and water and shelter for us. That is wildest of thoughts – and it’s the truth.

6. Put your life force into something useful.
Don’t waste a second of your life on things that are useless – like painful memories or grudges or resentments. What good does that do you? Every day is one less day of your life. In fact, today could be the last day of your life for all you know. Make it a good last day.

7. Dedicate your life to a good cause along the way.
Make a difference in this world in some way. Leave a positive footprint, not just a small carbon one. Make a difference. Your life should count for something.

8. Take time to pray in your own way.
Prayer is power – pure mystical power. It’s not rational power and it’s definitely not intellectual. You can’t see it. There is no proof that prayer is “working”. But it does and it is. And praying is not a hobby; it’s devotion. Figure out a way to weave prayer time into your daily life.

9. Feed your inner life. Do things that enrich your soul.
I believe people need spiritual direction. I believe that many psychological disorders are unrecognized spiritual sufferings. Professionals are still intimidated by the reality of spiritual crises. They don’t know how to treat a spiritual crisis or what to say to someone or how to respond to questions about the reality of the unseen outer – and inner – world. You need to know your soul and you need to know when to reach for spiritual guidance. Drugs will never solve a spiritual crisis – never. Drugs cannot combat darkness or evil.

10. Evil is real. Sin is real.
A basic definition of sin is this: Knowingly doing or saying something that you know will damage another person’s life OR knowingly/deliberately allowing another person to pay the price/take the consequences for a negative action of yours. The conscious act of knowing that what you are doing is wrong – and that what you are doing is harming another in any way – and yet you do it anyway – is Sin. Done. No getting around it. A conscious negative act against another human being is not just a boo-boo or a bummer. It is a Sin because it is CONSCIOUS and thus an act of CHOICE. It is a conscious misuse of your power of creation – and we are held accountable for these choices. That is why we cannot shake free of such choices. That is why the guilt from these choices sticks to us like gum on our shoes. That gum is our soul connected to the soul of the person we harmed. Never tell yourself that evil does not exist. It does. Every time you easily play with the truth, ask yourself, “How come it’s so easy to lie? What’s wrong with me? Why is telling the truth so difficult? Shouldn’t this be the other way around?” The spiritual path is a path of becoming One with Truth, which means confronting our relationship with the shadow in ourselves. It’s not easy and that shadow meets us around every corner in our life. My counsel to everyone – and the one I practice is to repeat a simple prayer whenever you feel that fragile edge of weakness or compromise-of-self coming on, “Hover over me, God – right now.” Surround yourself with grace. Live in grace.

11. Practice joy, love, charity, compassion, understanding, and healing.
Share your graces. Be ridiculously generous with your gifts. Don’t listen to people who tell you not to spread yourself too thin. Spread yourself so thin with your graces that you become invisible. Be as loving as you can – you’ll find that you recharge instantly. (Loving by the way is not the same as behaving foolishly. It means holding lovingness in your way of being, in the tone of your voice, in how you approach people, in giving someone that extra second before you get feisty with impatience.) No one should ever say, “I’ve got so much to give and no one to give it to.” That’s just being selfish. All that means is, “All I want to do is love one person who loves me back.”

12. Finally, live a bold life.
Don’t retire. Die exhausted from creativity, loving, adventure, service, sharing and wonder. It doesn’t take money to make a difference in this world; it takes choice, courage, and your willingness to get off the couch and make a commitment to show up and do the work. Pray for others. Send grace to the places in this world that are on fire with pain – the suffering people of Aleppo comes to mind. Channel grace wherever you go. So long as you are alive, remember that every choice you make is either one that releases grace or withholds it. Simple as that. At the end of the day, reflect on your choices. In those circumstances in which you have withheld grace, figure out why you made that choice and then think about others withholding grace in their choices when it comes to you. It’s an uncomfortable thought, to say the least. But it’s the perfect motivator to make us aware of the power of every choice we make in life.

Thank you again for all the support through the years in being a part of the Salon family and all my work. My gratitude to you is more than I can express. Expect to see me via Newsletters.

I wish all of you a blessed holiday season and a holy and wondrous 2017 – wow, look at that number – 2017. Whew. See you next year, I hope, at a workshop or at an online class – or in my prayers.

Source: Caroline Myss

Life and A Bamboo Tree


This is a famous analogy between Life.. and a Bamboo Tree
It helped push me through hard times.. and I wish to pay it forward..
I hope this reaches someone in need.

Published on Nov 21, 2017

Join Amoda Maa at her East Coast 5 Day Silent Retreat – Kripalu Center, Massachusetts
December 3 – 7, 2017

In this video – Amoda talks about how when we get stuck in “feeling bad” about ourselves or about the world, we are perpetuating separation. She invites you to look deeper than that.

By Amoda Maa Jeevan, author of Embodied Enlightenment

A surprising number of people, especially in today’s materially oriented world, experience a lack of self-worth.

There’s a common belief, even in spiritual circles, that not having enough money is a sign of unworthiness. This usually translates into “I am unable to receive,” “I don’t love myself,” or “I’m not good enough.” What often follows is an attempt to improve self-worth in order to attract more money in order to feel abundant, and therefore to believe yourself to be worthy. Sometimes this works (at least for a while), but mostly it does not.

The acquisition of psychological and spiritual tools for fixing yourself and getting what you want in order to feel better about yourself is a huge error of attention. By giving allegiance to the story of “me” and “my life,” the ping-pong of feeling worthy and feeling unworthy is prolonged. It’s a perpetuation of the seeking mechanism, and there is no fulfillment in this.

True fulfillment comes only when you awaken out of the dream of separation. When you fulfill your inner purpose of awakening to your true nature as the unboundedness of being, the polarity of worthiness and unworthiness collapses into the totality of now. You do not need to feel abundant, because abundance is here as the fullness of this moment. There is no one to judge you as worthy or unworthy. It was only ever yourself judging yourself. When you awaken out of the dream of separation, this is seen to be ludicrous (and a waste of time)!

When you stop right here and rest deeply in the softness of your belly, in the gentle throb of your heartbeat, in the pregnant pause between each breath, in the alive awakeness of now, you may well discover that this moment is rich beyond measure, and that there is no limit to abundance.

Amoda Maa Jeevan is the author of Embodied Enlightenment: Living Your Awakening in Every Moment, published by New Harbinger Publications. Copyright 2017.

September 12, 2017

By The Dalai Lama: Almost six decades have passed since I left my homeland, Tibet, and became a refugee…

Thanks to the kindness of the government and people of India, we Tibetans found a second home where we could live in dignity and freedom, able to keep our language, culture and Buddhist traditions alive.

My generation has witnessed so much violence — some historians estimate that more than 200 million people were killed in conflicts in the 20th century.

Today, there is no end in sight to the horrific violence in the Middle East, which in the case of Syria has led to the greatest refugee crisis in a generation. Appalling terrorist attacks — as we were sadly reminded this weekend — have created deep-seated fear. While it would be easy to feel a sense of hopelessness and despair, it is all the more necessary in the early years of the 21st century to be realistic and optimistic.

There are many reasons for us to be hopeful. Recognition of universal human rights, including the right to self-determination, has expanded beyond anything imagined a century ago. There is growing international consensus in support of gender equality and respect for women. Particularly among the younger generation, there is a widespread rejection of war as a means of solving problems. Across the world, many are doing valuable work to prevent terrorism, recognizing the depths of misunderstanding and the divisive idea of “us” and “them” that is so dangerous. Significant reductions in the world’s arsenal of nuclear weapons mean that setting a timetable for further reductions and ultimately the elimination of nuclear weapons — a sentiment President Obama recently reiterated in Hiroshima, Japan — no longer seem a mere dream.

The notion of absolute victory for one side and defeat of another is thoroughly outdated; in some situations, following conflict, suffering arises from a state that cannot be described as either war or peace. Violence inevitably incurs further violence. Indeed, history has shown that nonviolent resistance ushers in more durable and peaceful democracies and is more successful in removing authoritarian regimes than violent struggle.

It is not enough simply to pray. There are solutions to many of the problems we face; new mechanisms for dialogue need to be created, along with systems of education to inculcate moral values. These must be grounded in the perspective that we all belong to one human family and that together we can take action to address global challenges.

It is encouraging that we have seen many ordinary people across the world displaying great compassion toward the plight of refugees, from those who have rescued them from the sea, to those who have taken them in and provided friendship and support. As a refugee myself, I feel a strong empathy for their situation, and when we see their anguish, we should do all we can to help them. I can also understand the fears of people in host countries, who may feel overwhelmed. The combination of circumstances draws attention to the vital importance of collective action toward restoring genuine peace to the lands these refugees are fleeing.

Tibetan refugees have firsthand experience of living through such circumstances and, although we have not yet been able to return to our homeland, we are grateful for the humanitarian support we have received through the decades from friends, including the people of the United States.

A further source of hope is the genuine cooperation among the world’s nations toward a common goal evident in the Paris accord on climate change. When global warming threatens the health of this planet that is our only home, it is only by considering the larger global interest that local and national interests will be met.

I have a personal connection to this issue because Tibet is the world’s highest plateau and is an epicenter of global climate change, warming nearly three times as fast as the rest of the world. It is the largest repository of water outside the two poles and the source of the Earth’s most extensive river system, critical to the world’s 10 most densely populated nations.

To find solutions to the environmental crisis and violent conflicts that confront us in the 21st century, we need to seek new answers. Even though I am a Buddhist monk, I believe that these solutions lie beyond religion in the promotion of a concept I call secular ethics. This is an approach to educating ourselves based on scientific findings, common experience and common sense — a more universal approach to the promotion of our shared human values.

Over more than three decades, my discussions with scientists, educators and social workers from across the globe have revealed common concerns. As a result, we have developed a system that incorporates an education of the heart, but one that is based on study of the workings of the mind and emotions through scholarship and scientific research rather than religious practice. Since we need moral principles — compassion, respect for others, kindness, taking responsibility — in every field of human activity, we are working to help schools and colleges create opportunities for young people to develop greater self-awareness, to learn how to manage destructive emotions and cultivate social skills. Such training is being incorporated into the curriculum of many schools in North America and Europe — I am involved with work at Emory University on a new curriculum on secular ethics that is being introduced in several schools in India and the United States.

It is our collective responsibility to ensure that the 21st century does not repeat the pain and bloodshed of the past. Because human nature is basically compassionate, I believe it is possible that decades from now we will see an era of peace — but we must work together as global citizens of a shared planet.

Source: dalai lama


We do need to have certain narratives about the world that alert us to real danger. We also need to recognize when those stories are taking over, blinding and separating us from our hearts, our awareness, and each other.

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