Tag Archive: Adyashanti



Published on Apr 13, 2017

http://adyashanti.org – Adyashanti explores the immensity of silence that permeates every moment. In the midst of immense noise, by noticing how quietness permeates each and every layer of existence, you can allow yourself to rest in this foundational silence. As you rest, without the energy of grasping or pushing away, you can access a deeper dimension of being. Adyashanti invites you to notice the silence that lives within every moment and experience the totality of each moment.

Video Excerpted From “Purity of Being”(DVD #64):
http://bit.ly/2p5uZfK

Quotes from this Video:

“In the midst of all this noise — whether it was the wind, the rain coming down beating on the roof and the deck outside, or the talk that she was giving — I started to notice that that moment was permeated with this great stillness, this immensity of quiet.”

“When I spontaneously listened to the whole of it, this other intuitive sensory organ opened up and I could hear all of it — the words, the rain, the wind, the silence. Nothing was preferred, nothing was being grasped at, nothing was being pushed away — all of it had equal value.”

“We are conditioned towards what is obvious, glaring, and noisy — whether it’s something on the outside or something on the inside. We’re not so much taught to value things that aren’t noisy — the things that aren’t trying to grab our attention.”

“Silence is the deepest teacher, it’s the deepest teaching — that’s what gives you access to the deeper dimension of being.”


Published on Apr 6, 2017

What is the moment calling forth in you? What kind of response is life calling forth in you? Adyashanti explores the interplay between finding an inner resource of peace within and expecting the world to conform to your ideas of peace. By becoming the manifestation of whatever change you want to see in the world, you are redefining your expectations of the world, taking responsibility for your own life, and engaging with your spirituality in a truly deep and profound way. Adyashanti invites you into the space where this vital question can be a living inquiry in your day-to-day practice.

Video Excerpted From “Being an Expression of Peace” (ID #245):
http://bit.ly/1sig5Dz

Quotes from this Video:

“We are all most powerful and most benevolent when we are actually being whatever we want to see in the world. This is our first responsibility—to be what we want the world to become, or be the way that we would like human beings to be, interact, and engage with each other.”

“If you haven’t found the inner resource of clarity or peace or love or whatever you want to see in the world, then you’ll feel more on edge. Because you won’t be coming from being the change you want to see in the world. You’ll want the world to change so that you can be at peace, so that you can feel safe, secure, and loving.”

“In many respects, finding the right question is more important than an answer. If we think of answers in the sense of something that we are going to receive, that has some sort of final stamp of authority, that we can hold onto for the rest of our lives—that’s to misunderstand something very important about life, which is that life is a movement.”

“We human beings have the tendency to want to hold onto almost everything. If we get a revelatory experience, we tend to want to hold onto that and concretize it into a new system of thought or description of explanation. And as we are doing that, the flow of our lives is continuing on, and the next moment may call for a slightly different response.”

“To really be present for what life is calling forth in each of us is extremely important. Most people that are engaged in one form of spirituality or another, at least at a deep or inner level, part of what they’re valuing is peace, love, and clarity—and often there is a desire to see life as more whole or complete, and to experience your whole being in a clear and more complete way.”

“If we are engaged in a spiritual orientation, that comes with a kind of responsibility. The responsibility is: to be able to find within ourselves what we want to find or would desire to find in the world around us. Because if we can’t find it in ourselves, then we don’t have a whole lot of right demanding that the world conform to the way we want it to be.”

“Part of spirituality is taking that responsibility so that you become the manifestation of whatever change you want to see—you become it in your attitude, in the way you feel, in the way you move in the world, in the actions that you decide to take. This is really the heart of the spiritual life.”

“It’s so important that our spiritual life doesn’t become overly self-centered. It’s one of the dangers of a lot of inner work—that we can become so involved with our self that we are not really breathing out, we’re not engaged with our own lives and with our own existence, in a way that’s really fulfilling.”

“Our lives are the greatest gift we are ever going to give to the world.”


Published on Apr 1, 2017

http://adyashanti.org – Who do you want to blame? Who do you want to withhold love from? Who are you so resentful and bitter towards that you would never want to express your love towards them? Adyashanti opens up a doorway into self-knowing, where you can explore where you are withholding love in your life. By holding up the torch of truth to your interactions and releasing your arguments with yourself, others, the world, and God, your world is dramatically transformed — your daily activities become more inclusive, and you begin to embody your awakening more fully.

Quotes from this Video:

“Step outside of everything you think you know.”

“The entire internal world — when you’re not thinking about it — just stops.”

“Doubt is powerful. Not the kind of doubt that makes you feel small and diminished and afraid to move, but the doubt where you see, ‘My God, the whole way that I have myself, and everybody, and everything hooked up in my mind may be nothing more than a thought. A persistent thought, but maybe nothing more than that.’”

“This is the kind of doubt that not only allows us to begin to experience the dimension of being but actually releases it into experience.”

“To be really awakened is to have no more argument with yourself, no more argument with the world, no more argument with others, and no more argument with God.”

“Reality is the ultimate bait-and-switch maneuver. It costs nothing to wake up, however it costs everything to stay awake.”

Published on Mar 26, 2017

Why do people want to become enlightened? According to spiritual teacher Adyashanti the spiritual impulse inside every human is because of Life’s longing to become fully conscious of itself. Life pushes us and it will do whatever it needs to in order to accomplish this goal: to become fully conscious of itself.

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Published on Mar 24, 2017

http://adyashanti.org – Adyashanti explores the human and divine qualities of life, how your humanness is an expression of divinity, and how your humanness and divinity are intimately intertwined. By extinguishing any attempt to avoid or transcend anything in your experience, an opportunity presents itself, and a fuller embrace of life becomes available to you. Adyashanti reveals how your revelation of the interlocking nature of humanness and divinity can be the catalyst for you to radically embrace all of existence.

Video Excerpted From “Jesus: Unifying Human and Divine”:
http://bit.ly/2dDIRf8

Quotes from this Video:

“This kind of surrender brings with it a kind of redeeming quality. It has a sense of being restored to your natural condition — not because you’ve left your humanity — but because spirit has completely embraced it.”

“This is the gift of the whole story. It is the descent of spirit into the world of time and space, whereas other stories are the awakening of spirit from time to the eternal. This is the eternal descending into time.”

“When you wake up, it tends to take you into emptiness. Yes, it’s an extremely full emptiness, but it’s an emptiness nonetheless — the emptiness of pure consciousness.”

“The story is giving voice to our divinity, and finding the divinity not just outside of humanity, in the unborn space of emptiness, but finding the divinity right in the world of form — and through a complete embrace of life as it actually is.”

“So to do this you’re embracing everything that it is to exist, which is the triumph and the tragedy of it. It is not a movement of seeking to avoid it, and it’s not a transcendent movement necessarily.”

“It’s a radical embrace of everything. It’s a ‘yes.’ It’s a leap of faith, and that brings the experience of redemption. Suddenly, you’ve discovered the completeness within everything. You’ve discovered the grace within the chaos.”

“Something within us reaches out for both of these kinds of graces — the transcendent grace and the grace within the human existence. Both of these are yearned for within the depths of our being. “


When people allow themselves to connect with what their spiritual life is about for them—what their deep questions are, what their deep yearning is—then they have all the vitality they need

Born in 1962 in Cupertino, California—with the given name Stephen Gray—Adyashanti is a well-known spiritual teacher devoted to serving the “awakening of all beings.” Although he often sounds as though he might belong to the Zen or Advaita Vedanta traditions—and, indeed, he practiced Zen for 14 years—Adyashanti attracts students from all backgrounds and says that his teachings are “not confined within any religious point of view, belief system, or doctrine.” He is the author of The Way of Liberation, Falling into Grace, True Meditation, and The End of Your World.

He recently spoke with S&H from his home in the foothills of the Santa Cruz mountains.

You’ve spoken openly about having awakening experiences. How would you describe enlightenment?

Enlightenment involves waking up to our true nature. One way you might describe it is that it’s like having a lucid dream, the experience of suddenly becoming aware that you’re dreaming. All of a sudden there’s another dimension of awareness that is conscious of the dream while you’re in it.

When you’re not conscious of the dream, you think that everything that’s going on in the dream is completely real and significant. It can be all-consuming. But as soon as you realize that you’re dreaming, there are two different qualities of consciousness. One is that you’re aware of whatever is happening in the dream. But then there’s another quality of consciousness, which is when your awareness recognizes itself.

Is that moment of recognition typically a big, wild experience?

Enlightenment is usually talked about almost exclusively in those terms. As a teacher, I found that the bigness or wildness of any kind of awakening experience has very little to do with what may be going on with a person five years after the experience. Sometimes massive spiritual openings are transformative. Other times, after a year or two, it’s almost as if nothing ever happened. Both of those different outcomes can be the result of the same fundamental insight.

In that sense, I think enlightenment exists on a sliding scale. How well have you integrated those insights into your life? That process of integration is an endless journey and it doesn’t necessarily happen after big spiritual openings, as people often think it does. We think, I’ll have an awakening experience, and then I’ll just know by some miracle how it all functions. Often, we don’t know how enlightenment functions, at least not in the beginning.

How can we meaningfully integrate the insights that come from big spiritual openings into our daily lives?

It’s difficult because in those moments you realize that you are, essentially, something quite different from what you might have imagined yourself to be before that. I think the way we approach the integration of that insight into our daily lives is often misguided. We might think that the integration is going to mean living in a particular state of experience. But it’s more of a question of how will revelatory moments actually trickle down into the way we move through life? One way this happens is that you can become more aware of when you’re out of alignment, let’s say. You can be in the middle of a conversation and feel very overtly the moment you say a word that’s not completely true. I don’t mean that you’re lying or deceiving, but there’s the feeling that one word wasn’t quite right. You feel it in your body, like somebody just put a little poison in it.

In other words, it’s not so much what we do as it is what we notice. Someone who is really attending to integration will notice, right in the middle of a sentence, where they’ve moved away from saying the truest thing. At that moment, they’ll have the opportunity either to just keep plowing forward or to just stop for a moment.

Let’s take a step back. Before we can integrate spiritual insights into our daily lives, we need to experience the insights. Do you recommend or teach people specific techniques to help them awaken?

Sure, there are all sorts of techniques. The two fundamental ways that I go about all of this are meditation and inquiry. Meditation is just taking the time to be still and quiet. When you’re meditating, you’re noticing that which is always still and always quiet. If you pursue stillness and quiet, it will usually disquiet you. So it’s more effective to simply notice what is always still and quiet.

Inquiry practice is directly engaging with the existential questions of life: Who am I? What is life? What is God? What is death? In other words, I don’t necessarily recommend a formulaic question. I want to know: What’s your question? What’s the question you have that seems so big that you almost don’t even want to engage with it because it seems so big? Those are the existential questions we all have. Inquiry practice is when we engage with those questions.

Let me give you a quick example. If a person starts to explore the question, Who am I? the first thing I often ask them to do is to slow down so they can see what happens when they search for an answer. Generally, what happens is we start to look inside. Consciousness does this little U-turn and it looks for you. Often, if it can get back behind the ideas and the images you carry around with you, which it actually does very quickly—there’s something there that’s noticed in a split second that most people turn away from. They get the answer immediately, but they turn away from it because it’s not what they expected.

When you look inside to find you, you expect to find something or someone. If you don’t find something or someone, you might say, “I don’t know the answer to the question because I looked and I didn’t find what I was looking for.” Okay, maybe not finding the answer is the beginning of the answer. You expected to find something and you didn’t. What if you just stopped with that? “What am I? I don’t know.” Well, what’s that experience like? That might not be the fullness of the answer, but it certainly opened the doorway. It just happens in a split second.

You’ve said that after you had an awakening experience, you were able to abide in it and no longer needed a daily practice. Can you say more about this?

Yeah, I didn’t need to do anything to keep it going. A lot of false conclusions could probably get made out of that statement. It’s not like I never practiced again. I had my first opening at 25—and other openings after that—and it’s not like I just stopped practicing entirely.

But it’s true that after those openings my practice—if we can call it a practice—shifted a lot. All the goal-driven part of the practice just disappeared. Even the ways that I understood meditation underwent a transformation. No longer did I think I needed to be meditating to be in a clear space. I realized that I didn’t need to be doing anything in particular to be in that space. That doesn’t mean I stopped practicing all the time, but that sometimes I was sitting in a traditional form, and sometimes it was just waking up in the morning and coming down and having a cup of tea while sitting on a chair on my porch for an hour.

So, awakening is not like a car that you have to keep maintaining so that it will run. How do you know when you’ve arrived there?

I think what happens is that you stop referencing “there.” Whatever “there” is for you, you realize, that was an idea I baked up. If you open up books or listen to teachings, you’ll see that even spiritual teachers define enlightenment in different ways. Which of those ways is going to be the way you measure yourself by? What convinces you that the yardstick you’re using is more relevant or more true than some other yardstick that someone else may be using?

The best thing I ever did was to start jettisoning my ideas about what enlightenment was and just made it into an open question.

Earlier you referred to meditation as taking time to notice “that which is always still and always quiet.” Can you say anything more about silence?

Silence is the foundational aspect of our nature. As soon as we stop talking or thinking, life always falls into silence. All life exists within the space of silence. In that way, silence is really a profound part of our own being and our own nature. Meditation is one of the most profound spiritual practices because it is literally simply listening to silence.

The silence I’m talking about isn’t the silence that we can manufacture through really strong concentration. There is that kind of silence, which is a contained silence. That’s the silence of a prisoner with their hands shackled and a piece of tape over their mouth. We do that through concentration. There’s a time for that and a space for that. But the silence that I’m talking about is the silence that’s with you all the time. It’s simply a silence we notice. Silence is a part of life. It’s the aspect of your own consciousness that’s totally and absolutely quiet, even if there’s a thought or a feeling. They’ll all rise within the space of silence.

I’ve found that we can always tell what we truly value in life through what we give our time and our attention to. If we give time and attention to silence, whether we’re in meditation or driving down the road, then it will grow. And if we just sit around thinking about that idea for a lot of time, we’ll just have lots of interesting thoughts about silence, which will just contribute to the noise.

What’s the relationship between silence and what you’ve been referring to as our “true nature”?

Silence is an aspect of what we really are. It’s not the whole definition, of course, by any means. But it’s part of our nature. It’s a much better way to define yourself than by your memories and all the ideas you’ve ever had. Sometimes I ask people, What survives your not thinking about it? Just be as quiet as you can and notice silence for five seconds. What survives? All the thoughts, ideas, opinions, judgments, the past, even defining yourself as a man or a woman or a son or a daughter—all that may have a relative reality to it. But you see that it doesn’t exist when you’re just being quiet. How real can it all be?

But whatever you are, you don’t disappear when you’re silent. The world doesn’t disappear when you’re silent. The glass of water doesn’t disappear when I stop thinking it’s a glass of water. The reality of life actually exists whether we’re thinking about it or not. I think it only takes those five seconds to see where most of us are actually living our whole life.

Does noticing silence mean we’re ignoring everything that doesn’t seem to exist when we’re in silence?

The silence I’m talking about is the natural silence of awareness before we go into a dreamy place, before we disconnect. It’s prior to all that movement of mind. One of the things that I often emphasize when teaching is that it has to be a vivid silence. If you feel spaced-out and dreamy internally, it’s like you’re leaning too far back. And if you just lean forward a little bit, it comes back into view.

Everything that you’re saying rings true in a way, but I also have this sense that it’s slipping through my fingers as you speak. Can you say more about how noticing silence can take shape in our real, day-to-day lives?

What’s important is where your attention is. Is your attention on this ceaseless narration or dream my mind is having? When you’re talking to yourself, have you ever asked yourself, Who do I think I’m talking to, anyway? Are there two of you? Is there one who’s talking and one who’s listening?

In the context of your daily life it just means noticing the underlying quietness in which your life happens. And that can happen anytime, anywhere. As I said, you don’t have to be meditating to do it. Meditation sort of helps kick-start it because you’re undistracted. But it’s also just noticing what is already there.

Quietness isn’t the goal, but it can be a step in the right direction. What comes next? I always figure that when I’m teaching, I’m talking to adults. Often in spiritual pursuits, people start to think like children. What do I do? How often do I do it? What should I be asking? My response is, “I don’t know. What do you want? Why are you here? What is this to you?” Don’t act like a child. You can actually be an adult, believe it or not, even with a spiritual teacher.

It sounds like people need to define their own spiritual goals. Couldn’t that process easily be coopted by a person’s selfish tendencies?

What I have found over the years is that when someone really allows themselves to connect with what their spiritual life is about for them—what their deep questions are, what their deep yearning is—then they have all the vitality they need. All of a sudden, the direction of their whole spiritual life starts to become conscious. We don’t get there, though, as long as we’re too stuck in thinking, What’s the prescription? How often should I be meditating? As I often say, “I don’t know. How often do you think you should be meditating?”

Yes, most people are really well served if they spend some time in silence and meditation every day. It’s a great thing. Even if you’re not involved in spiritual pursuits, it’s good for you. But unless you’re connected to the deeper issues—asking, “What is this about for me?”—it’s not going to be meaningful to you. Once you get your question, you have all the vitality that you’ll ever need.

Earlier in this conversation you mentioned enlightenment existing on a sliding scale. How do you know where you are on the scale?

That has to be a living question inside yourself. What is enlightenment at this moment? That takes away all of the measuring yourself against an ideal. There are a lot of ideals in the spiritual world. People will tell you it’s going to look like this or that. I think it’s much healthier if we just admit from the very beginning, “I actually don’t know what it is.”

That way the answer can change, grow, and become something different over time.

It matures as you mature. It’s not just the answer that matures, but the question matures. The question can become more and more simple as the ideas of what we think we’re supposed to be like fall away. This is a process of discovery. You’ve opened the door and it’s raining. What happens, in your experience, when you let go of your opposition to the rain? It’s a question you’re asking rather than a directive to do something.

Sam Mowe is a regular contributor to Spirituality & Health. He splits his time between Brooklyn and Garrison, New York, where he lives and works in a former monastery on the Hudson River.


Published on Mar 17, 2017

http://adyashanti.org – Adyashanti explores what is occurring within the field of our consciousness in every moment. How do you react to situations, no matter whether they are positive or negative experiences of being? Do you find truth and reality within them, or do you simply allow them to be as they are? Instead of being led around by the content of your experience, what would happen if you didn’t automatically ascribe reality to every emotion or thought that arises?

Quotes from this Video:

“We all become completely mesmerized by whatever is occurring within our field of consciousness—whatever we think, whatever we feel, our reactions to what is happening in the world around us, our reactions to our own reactions, and our thoughts about our thinking.”

“There’s nothing in the world that’s going to tell you, ‘You shouldn’t be thinking so much,’ except another thought.”

“Our consciousness is always involved in this relationship with its environment. It’s always eliciting feelings, experiences, and thoughts about those feelings and experiences — and often looking for reality within that matrix.”


Published on Feb 23, 2017

http://adyashanti.org – During one of his silent meditation days, Adyashanti leads this guided meditation that focuses on stillness, listening, and using your breath as a guide. By sitting down for meditation, you are accepting the commitment to just be still. As you rest into your being and your body rests into stillness, your mind can adjust to this new environment and relax into its true nature. From this depth of stillness and deep listening, your natural state of awareness is recognized as always available. Adyashanti invites you into this state of deep availability to notice the already existing stillness that underscores every moment.

Video Excerpted From “Silent Meditation Day Vol. 1 – San Anselmo Mar 2016”(ID #614):
http://bit.ly/2dDIRf8

Quotes from this Video:

“Meditation is the art of listening.”

“If the body remains still, the mind will eventually follow.”

“Take a few minutes to attend to the breath. If there are any places that are holding tension, just notice it, and invite those places to relax.”

“The breath is an anchor point. Think of it like the ballast on the bottom of the boat. A place in you physically between heaven and earth.”

“Because the breath is always there, at any point during the day or any point during your meditation, you can bring attention back to your breath.”

“There is a state of already existing stillness. It’s not something you make happen, it’s simply something that you notice.”

“Your own natural awareness is already and always in a state of allowing everything to be as it is.”


Published on Feb 23, 2017

Have you ever wondered who you are without your personal identity that defines who you believe yourself to be? Spiritual teacher Adyashanti advises us to just stop the narrative self for a moment and see who you are. He says that it is difficult for us to define ourselves when we are not allowed to refer to thoughts. But when we have experienced so much suffering, then the only option might be the death of the ego, which leads to spiritual enlightenment.

Published on Feb 20, 2017

Spiritual Teacher with a Zen Buddhism background Adyashanti tells a beautiful story of how Sri Ramakrishna Paramahansa dealt graciously with cancer and death.

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What do spiritual masters know about the mind?

Adyashanti is an American-born spiritual teacher devoted to serving the awakening of all beings. His teachings are an open invitation to stop, inquire, and recognize what is true and liberating at the core of all existence. He is the author of The Way of Liberation, Falling into Grace, True Meditation, and Resurrecting Jesus: Embodying the Spirit of a Revolutionary Mystic. I’ve done a number of retreats with Adya who is in my estimation one of the three truly original spiritual thinkers of our moment, the other two being Eckhart Tolle and Byron Katie. We had a great time talking about the process of enlightenment and how Christianity lost its way.

Mark Matousek: I was surprised to see you’d written a book about Jesus, considering your background in Zen Buddhism. How did that happen?

Adyashanti: It really was a labor of love. For the last two or three years, I’ve been doing one retreat a year that focuses on Jesus’s teachings, so this was a natural outgrowth of that.

MM: Why did you choose to emphasize the revolutionary Jesus?

A: That’s a characteristic of Jesus that speaks to me. When I was practicing Zen Buddhism intensively during my twenties, I went through this period of being involved with the Christian mystics. There was something I wasn’t finding in my Zen practice. Many years later I realized that what I was looking for was the opening of the spiritual heart. I got around to reading the New Testament and I didn’t even recognize the Jesus in those gospels. I literally thought, who is this guy? He came off as such a revolutionary. He was very outspoken about the issues of his day, the power structure of his own religion, political issues, and so on. In contrast to the typical Eastern sage removed from society, Jesus was very much a man of the world. We grow up with this idea of him as some sort of God-man transcendent of everything then you read the gospels and find out that he wasn’t at all. He had some very human characteristics.

MM: Is there a conflict for you between Christianity, which posits faith in God, and Buddhism that denies God’s existence?

A: From a theological perspective, there are obviously some very great differences. Personally, though, I don’t find a conflict because I look at these things from a big view and not through a tight theological lens. Both Jesus and Buddha are representations of archetypal spiritual patterns within us. The Buddha is the archetypal image of transcendent realization, that which was never touched by time and the world, nor by human difficulty. The Jesus story is an archetype of something quite different: an engaged realization. Jesus doesn’t find his freedom through transcendence of the world but from a very, very deep engagement. In the Jesus story itself, the spirit of heaven descends upon Jesus, which is a very different kind of spiritual awakening. It’s the descent of spirit into form rather than the arising spirit waking up out of form. Both of these are legitimate approaches to awakening. Our Western spiritual traditions, Judaism, Islam, and Christianity, aim at achieving a relationship with the divine, whereas the Eastern, non-dual traditions aim at identification with (or as) the divine. At times, what’s missing from non-dual practice is the spiritual heart. You can have an extraordinary amount of transcendent realization without the spiritual heart, which is a deep, intuitive, intimate connectedness with life around you.

MM: In Resurrecting Jesus, you write, “the search for the historical Jesus isn’t the point. The point is the story, the collective dream.” What is to be gained by rediscovering the power of the collective dream?

A: In the West, when you call something a myth you are basically saying it’s not true. That’s a complete misunderstanding of what myth actually is, though. Myth is a story meant to convey something that can’t be put in ordinary language. So when we look at something like the Jesus story mythologically without worrying about how much is true, we can enter into a creative relationship with the story. Instead of asking what Jesus actually said, we can ask what this story evokes in us. Myths are meant to evoke hidden dimensions of human consciousness. The Jesus story becomes much more powerful in this way, as well as healing. We’ve grown up in a culture that’s absolutely dripping and saturated with this story. It has an immense influence on the Western psyche and if we can’t make real peace with that story, it becomes like a wound that doesn’t heal.

MM: The wound of Christianity?

A: The wound of how we’ve understood Christianity. I’ll give you an example. Part of the Judeo Christian tradition is the idea of Original Sin. As a result, you have this rampant disease of unworthiness in Western cultures that, for the better part of 2,500 years, have lived with this mythology of the fall. Until we can reinterpret this story, it’s very, very hard to heal the wound of feeling unworthy. We have to be able to go back and look at it again with fresh eyes. Jesus didn’t go around telling people that they were unworthy. It’s the theologians that went around after he died telling people they were unworthy. That never entered into any of Jesus’s dialogues at all.

MM: You write that Zen taught you about “the dimension of being far beyond personal psychology.” How would you describe this dimension?

A: There is a dimension of experience within you that’s eternal and has no history. It has no time, it has no past, it has no personality, it has no karma, it has no problem. It’s the dimension of consciousness that is literally outside of time and everything that touches time. The non-dual traditions, such as Zen, are very, very powerful at evoking that dimension of human experience. But this doesn’t necessarily solve problems relating to personal psychology. So you can be very deeply rooted in a very transcendent experience of being and still have some very problematic, unresolved issues in your psychology.

MM: As someone who lives in this dimension most of the time, do you struggle with emotions and conflict in daily life?

A: There hasn’t really been much struggle for the past ten years or so. Of course, it could be different when I get out of bed tomorrow. (laughs) The underlying feeling state for me is contentment. It’s a serene kind of joy that underlies everything. At first, I had a very powerful awakening to eternity and then, over the ensuing years, my spirituality moved toward embracing everything that I had transcended, the nature of human emotion, personality, and so on. What I’ve found is that the dimension of eternity and the dimension of time are really one in the same. I just feel at ease with it all. I’m at ease with my humanity. I’m at ease with eternity. I’m at ease with life. It doesn’t mean that everything goes smoothly. I’m like everybody else. Life has its challenges but it’s just not a big deal. There’s an underlying sense of ease and Ok-ness.

MM: What do you find most challenging?

A: To be quite honest, very trivial things. The thing I probably find most challenging in personal life is my computer. I’m not joking. The bigger things aren’t big challenges for me anymore. But I can get frustrated at my computer and the first thing you’ll hear is me yelling for my wife to come help me. Mukti, come and save me from this device! I found the devil and it’s a computer. Strangely enough, when humans don’t do the things you might expect them to do, that’s not really very frustrating to me. I totally get that.

MM: You don’t get angry at people?

A: No, not really. Years ago, I had this realization, this experience, where something just finally completely fell away. The whole self-structure, which is the thing that’s always looking within. The turn of consciousness that’s always evaluating things. The whole self-structure just sort of fell away. The most honest way I can describe it is that I lost my inner world. So when things happen, they just happen. There’s not much inner life for them to affect.

MM: There’s nothing to protect.

A: Right. There’s nothing to protect. There’s no inner story that feels compelled to protect itself.

MM: Finally, I’d like to ask you about the notion of divine incarnation, regarding Jesus, Buddha, or anyone else described as an avatar. How do you interpret that?

A: I think that every single incarnation is a divine incarnation. I know nothing nor do I care to know about avatars. I think “avatar” is an idea. And the idea is separative. It assumes that there are divine incarnations as opposed to what? Other people that aren’t divine? How can that possibly be? Because one person has realized it and another hasn’t? If somebody hasn’t discovered their true nature it doesn’t make them one iota less divine. Some people may come into their incarnation never having forgotten their true nature; if someone wants to call that person an avatar, fine. But when we think that avatars have some sort of “more essential divinity,” we’re back in the world of separation, duality, and mind-made divisions that aren’t really there. If someone is born in full remembrance of who they are, good for them.. But that doesn’t mean they have more divinity than a heroin addict in the gutter. The heroin addict doesn’t know that they’re divine —that’s the difference. It’s a relative difference, not an essential difference. And that’s what I love about the Jesus story. He got made into an avatar and the God-man and all this stuff after he died, but his way of moving in the world was very ordinary. He was a very outspoken critic of the various ways that us human beings create divisions and then take advantage of those divisions. That’s why I say that enlightenment doesn’t raise you, it actually lowers you because you see the reality of all beings. Not just your beings, but all beings. Otherwise it’s just an enlightened ego that thinks it’s better than, more spiritual, or whatever. It shows you that all ultimately on the same playing field. We’re the same stuff. In that absolute sense, we are all of profound equality. To me, the enlightened view is the ultimate form of democracy.

Source: The Huffington Post


Published on Feb 11, 2017

Audio: Adyashanti ~ Is My Story Really True?
From: Healing The Core Wound Of Unworthiness, The Gift Of Redemptive Love.
created by Rio Jeffrey


Published on Feb 9, 2017

http://adyashanti.org – Adyashanti introduces the online study course that he will be doing March 2017 called, “Fierce Love: Being a Sane and Benevolent Presence in a World of Confusion.” The emphasis of this course will be on being a loving presence in the world of relationship, work, and all of the various commitments that you have. How can you bring more love and compassion into every element of your life, and let loving action guide and inform your every move in the world? How can you be a more benevolent presence to life itself and all those people whom you cherish and love? Adyashanti invites you to join him for this 4-week commitment to put love into action.

FIERCE LOVE


Published on Jan 26, 2017

Adyashanti explores how the feeling of uncertainty can have the tendency to cause unbalance and unease. By delving into your own exploration of uncertainty with an open heart and mind, you can find a quietness from which everything arises. This quietness is fertile ground for awakening and bringing your long-dormant capacities online. Adyashanti invites you to embrace uncertainty and the deep knowing that can arise from it.

Video Excerpted From “The Freedom of Not Knowing”:
http://bit.ly/2dDIRf8

Quotes from this Video:

“Sometimes to the ego mind, letting go of certainty can feel like a kind of defeat, even though it’s not really.”

“Everything is connected up—there isn’t this thing called the heart and this thing called the mind—they’re all connected. It’s one. It’s part of one massive happening, one organism.”

“As our mind opens, our heart opens. And as our heart opens, our mind opens. And so it goes.”

“The more uncertain you are, the more quiet you become.”

“Spiritual awakening itself is actually awakening or bringing online a capacity that lies dormant within us.”

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