Tag Archive: Dr. Ervin Lazlo


You Can Change the World: The Global Citizen’s Handbook for Living on Planet Earth should be required reading for anyone who cares about the future of the planet. Written by renowned scientist, futurist and Club of Budapest founder Ervin Laszlo, You Can Change the World answers two pertinent questions-first, what is at the root of all the conflict and crisis in today’s world? And second, what can actually be done to move toward a world where we can live in peace, without marginalizing and killing each other and destroying the environment?

A handbook that urges readers to become global citizens who aspire to live responsibly on this precious but highly exploited and crisis-prone planet, You Can Change the World provides a simple and basic message: in today’s world it is neither wealth nor power, nor the control of territory and technology that make the crucial difference. How we think and act shapes our present and decides our future.

Dr. Laszlo is generally recognized as the founder of systems philosophy and general evolution theory. His work in recent years has centered on the formulation and development of the “Akasha Paradigm,” the new conception of cosmos, life and consciousness emerging at the forefront of the contemporary sciences. He serves as President of the Club of Budapest, Chairman of the Ervin Laszlo Center for Advanced Study, Chancellor of the Giordano Bruno New-Paradigm University, and Editor of World Futures: The Journal of New Paradigm Research.

He is recipient of the highest degree in philosophy and human sciences from the Sorbonne, the University of Paris, as well as of the coveted Artist Diploma of the Liszt Ferenc Academy of Budapest. Additional prizes and awards include four honorary doctorates.

His appointments have included research grants at Yale and Princeton Universities, professorships for philosophy, systems sciences, and future sciences at the Universities of Houston, Portland State, and Indiana, as well as Northwestern University and the State University of New York. His career also included guest professorships at various universities in Europe and the Far East. In addition, he worked as program director for the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). In 1999 he was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Canadian International Institute of Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics.

For many years he has served as president of The Club of Budapest, which he founded. He is an advisor to the UNESCO Director General, ambassador of the International Delphic Council, member of both the International Academy of Science, World Academy of Arts and Science, and the International Academy of Philosophy.

Twice nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize (2004, 2005), he got Goi Peace prize (2001). He has authored more than 70 books, which have been translated into twenty languages, and has published in excess of four hundred articles and research papers, including six volumes of piano recordings.

Ervin Laszlo on The Future of Our World

Dr. Ervin Laszlo, is a world-renowned philosopher of science, systems theorist and integral theorist as well as a classical pianist. A true Renaissance man and citizen of the world, he is the author of over 80 books translated into 21 languages. In this interview we discuss the very timely book he edited with Allan Combs called Thomas Berry, Dreamer of the Earth — The Spiritual Ecology of the Father of Environmentalism. It contains 10 essays by eminent philosophers, thinkers, and scientists that focus on the environmental and social crises facing humanity and the urgent need for a massive paradigm shift.
Read about this book and others at http://www.ncreview.com/

About Quantum Shift in the Global Brain

The shift from scientific materialism to a multidimensional worldview in harmony with the world’s great spiritual traditions

• Articulates humanity’s critical choice–to be the last decade of an outgoing, obsolete world, or the first of a new and viable one

• Presents a new “reality map” to guide us through the environmental, scientific, and geopolitical upheavals we are experiencing

Our world is in a Macroshift. The reality we are experiencing today is a substantially new reality–climate change, global corporations, industrialized agriculture–challenging us to change with our rapidly changing world, lest we perish.

In this book, Ervin Laszlo presents a new “reality map” to guide us through the world shifts we are experiencing–the problems, opportunities, and challenges we face individually as well as collectively–in order to help us understand what we must do during this time of great transition. Science’s cutting edge now views reality as broader, as multiple universes arising in a possibly infinite meta-universe, as well as deeper, extending into dimensions at the subatomic level. Laszlo shows that aspects of human experience that had previously been consigned to the domain of intuition and speculation are now being explored with scientific rigor and urgency. There has been a shift in the materialistic scientific view of reality toward the multidimensional worldview of multiple interconnected realities long known by the world’s great spiritual traditions. By understanding the interconnectedness of our changing world as well as our changing “map” of the world, we can navigate with insight, wisdom, and confidence.

Ervin Laszlo, twice nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, is editor of the international periodical World Futures: The Journal of General Evolution and Chancellor-Designate of the newly formed GlobalShift University. He is the founder and president of the international think tanks the Club of Budapest and the General Evolution Research Group and the author of 83 books translated into 21 languages. He lives in Italy.

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Present! – Ervin Laszlo and WorldShift 2012 (part one)

Dr. Laszlo talks about practical ways to transform our current crisis into a process of planetary renewal (part one of a two part talk).

Present! – Ervin Laszlo and WorldShift 2012 (part two)

Scientific evidence for the continual presence of consciousness with or without connection to a living organism

• Examines findings on the survival of consciousness beyond life, including near-death experiences, after-death communication, and reincarnation

• Explains how this correlates precisely with cutting-edge physics theories on superstrings, information fields, and energy matrices

• Reveals how consciousness manifests in living beings to continue its evolution

Evidence now points to consciousness existing beyond the brain, such as when the brain is temporarily incapacitated, as well as to the survival of consciousness after death. Conventional science prefers to dismiss these findings because they cannot be accommodated by a materialist view of reality. Spirituality and religion embrace the continuity of consciousness and ascribe it to a nonmaterial spirit or soul that is immortal. As such, spirituality/religion and science continually find conflict in their views. But what if there truly is no conflict?

Based on a new scientific paradigm in sync with experience-based spirituality, Ervin Laszlo and Anthony Peake explore how consciousness is continually present in the cosmos and can exist without connection to a living organism. They examine the rapidly growing body of scientific evidence supporting the continuity of consciousness, including near-death experiences, after-death communication, reincarnation, and neurosensory information received in altered states. They explain how the persistence of consciousness beyond the demise of the body means that, in essence, we are not mortal–we continue to exist even when our physical existence has come to an end. This correlates precisely with cutting-edge physics, which posits that things in our plane of time and space are not intrinsically real but are manifestations of a hidden dimension where they exist in the form of superstrings, information fields, and energy matrices.

With proof that consciousness is basic to the cosmos and immortal in its deeper, nonmanifest realm, Laszlo and Peake reveal the purpose of consciousness is to manifest in living beings in order to continuously evolve.

About the Author(s) of The Immortal Mind
Ervin Laszlo is a systems scientist, integral theorist, and classical pianist. Twice nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, he is the founder and president of the international think tank the Club of Budapest as well as the Ervin Laszlo Center for Advanced Study. He lives in Tuscany.

Anthony Peake is a writer, researcher, and author of 7 books, including Making Sense of Near-Death Experiences, which received a “highly commended” award from the British Medical Association. He lives in Crawley, West Sussex, U.K.

Table of Contents

Prologue: The Big Question

Part 1
The Evidence

Consciousness beyond the Brain

1 Near-Death Experiences
2 Apparitions and After-Death Communication
3 Medium-Transmitted Communication
4 Instrumental Transcommunication
5 Past-Life Recollection
6 Reincarnation

Part 2
The Science
Cosmos and Consciousness

7 The Rediscovery of the Deep Dimension
8 Consciousness in the Cosmos

Part 3
The Explanation

9 Re-experiencing Consciousness: The Recall from the Akasha
10 Death and Beyond: The Return to the Akasha

Afterword Conscious Immortality: The Dawn of a New Era

Appendix Confirming Views from Extraordinary Sources

Notes

Index
Take a look inside here

Anthony Peake @ Awakened State, Edinburgh 11/05/2013

Published on Mar 23, 2014

The extraordinary science of what happens when we die.
Can there ever be a scientifically satisfactory explanation as to what happens to human consciousness at the point of death? Anthony Peake, acclaimed author on the matter of consciousness, believes there is. Pulling together the latest evidence from the fields of quantum physics, neurology, consciousness studies and psychology, Peake presents a compelling, original theory to explain what exactly happens when we die.

Filmed on Sat 11th May 2013 at Teviot, Edinburgh
http://www.awakenedstate.co.uk

Anchor: Richard Ritchie
Filmed by: Julian Stern and Ricardo Ecabello
Post Production by: Iain Fugue

Exploring the Nature of Consciousness Beyond the Brain

Published on Sep 20, 2014

EBTV presents host Evita Ochel (http://www.evitaochel.com) with returning guest Anthony Peake (http://www.anthonypeake.com) in a dialogue about the nature and immortality of consciousness.

Anthony Peake is a researcher, writer and speaker who deals with borderline areas of human consciousness. He is the author of 8 books. His newest releases include “The Infinite Mindfield: the quest to find the gateway to higher consciousness” and “The Immortal Mind: Science and the Continuity of Consciousness Beyond the Brain” which he co-authored with Ervin Laszlo.

Past episodes with Anthony Peake on EBTV:

1. The Illusions of Reality: Life, Death and Time

2. Quantum Time: The Illusion of Past, Present and Future
General topics covered in this video include:

1. The nature of consciousness. (2:00)
– does consciousness really exist?
– the continuous nature of consciousness
– the eye-brain-consciousness connection

2. Comparing the reality of inner versus outer worlds. (8:09)
– the nature of consensual reality
– connections to telepathy, hallucinations and dreams
– experiences with DMT
– the limits of our perception

3. How to work with altered states of consciousness and/or alternate realities. (18:15)
– the nature of the DMT molecule
– the prerequisite evolution required

4. The role of consciousness in the deja vu phenomenon. (23:26)
– the nature of seeing and hearing in deja vu
– the nature of precognitive deja vu
– the connection of deja vu to the nature of time
– the Akashic field and the simulation theory of reality

5. The connection of consciousness research to Philip K. Dick. (32:25)
– his precognitive life and work

6. The purpose of consciousness and its immortal nature.(40:17)
– consciousness beyond the brain
– consciousness beyond death

7. Exploring reincarnation in light of an immortal consciousness. (46:06)

8. Exploring “glitches in the matrix”. (50:35)

9. Anthony shares about his upcoming new work. (52:54)
– the neuro-chemistry side of consciousness

This anthology offers wide-ranging views by various global experts about the end of the Mayan calendar in 2012, as well as related prophecies and associated physical changes of Earth’s structure. The purpose of this collection is to broaden your perspective about such issues and concerns, so you can discern for yourself what your commitment to planetary life will be-and then to demonstrate your commitment into being, beginning this very instant.

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Ervin László: A new mindset is emerging

Ervin Laszlo, who was twice nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, is interviewed by Lilou Mace about a new mindset, a new paradigm, that is emerging on our planet.

Said Laszlo:
I talk about what interests me most. It’s a new way of thinking — what I call a new paradigm — updating the way we think about ourselves and the world, which is very much needed because the world evolves much faster than our thinking does…
We are moving from a mechanistic, fragmented paradigm to a holistic, quantum-based paradigm… The outcome of it is that we actually feel ourselves much more belonging to this larger community of life…
Something larger doesn’t have to be a divinity. Something larger can be the whole community of life that has evolved on Earth. With over seven billion people, humans are a member of that. But, we are forgetting that we are a member of that, and we are forgetting that we are a whole community. We just think of ourselves…
I think that there are no foreigners on this planet… We are all brothers and sisters. We closer to some because we live together — more with some than with others. But, there are no people who do not belong to this large human community and the community of life. That, I think, is a new paradigm — the sense of becoming one, which is keynoted by this concept of love. Love means feeling one’s belonging to each other, which I think is the new paradigm. If young people grow up with that and start acting on that basis, we won’t have all of these problems that we’ve had (all this crises), because we will use our creativity to collaborate — instead of working against each other, trying to out-compete each
other, or become more powerful that the other — we try to see how we can together solve the problems.

Laszlo also talks about the Akashic field…Ervin Laszlo is a systems philosopher, integral theorist, and classical pianist. Twice nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize, he has authored more than 70 books, which have been translated into nineteen languages, and has published in excess of four hundred articles and research papers, including six volumes of piano recordings.

Dr. Laszlo is generally recognized as the founder of systems philosophy and general evolution theory, and serves as the founder-director of the General Evolution Research Group and as past president of the International Society for the Systems Sciences. He is also the recipient of the highest degree in philosophy and human sciences from the Sorbonne, the University of Paris, as well as of the coveted Artist Diploma of the Franz Liszt Academy of Budapest. Additional prizes and awards include four honorary doctorates.

His appointments have included research grants at Yale and Princeton Universities, professorships for philosophy, systems sciences, and future sciences at the Universities of Houston, Portland State, and Indiana, as well as Northwestern University and the State University of New York. His career also included guest professorships at various universities in Europe and the Far East. In addition, he worked as program director for the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). In 1999 he was was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Canadian International Institute of Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics.

For many years he has served as president of the Club of Budapest, which he founded. He is an advisor to the UNESCO Director General, ambassador of the International Delphic Council, member of both the International Academy of Science, World Academy of Arts and Science, and the International Academy of Philosophy. source http://ervinlaszlo.com/

About Dawn of the Akashic Age
A preview of the post-mechanistic, holistic world in 2020 and 2030 as well as a map of the obstacles we must overcome to get there

• Reveals how the youngest generation is seeding the shift in consciousness

• Explains how society will be reorganized into grassroots networks like those revealed by quantum physics and experienced through social media

• With contributions from futurist John L. Petersen, ex-CEO of Sanyo Tomoya Nonaka, media activist Duane Elgin, and other visionaries

The world is changing. The transition from the mechanistic worldview to one that recognizes the interconnectedness of all life is upon us. It is the dawning of the Akashic Age. The Akashic field that connects the universe is now recognized by cutting-edge science. What we know about communication, energy, and consciousness is rapidly evolving in tandem with the new quantum worldview. Many adults are consciously evolving to meet the transitional challenges at hand, while today’s youth have arrived already hard-wired with the new consciousness. Rising from the ashes of the old systems, this Phoenix generation of radical change agents is seeding our evolution and spiritual transformation, a process that will continue over the next few decades.

Authors Ervin Laszlo and Kingsley Dennis look at the chief engine of the coming changes–the growing global understanding of nonlocality–and the development of practical applications for it. They examine how the new values and new consciousness taking hold will reorganize society from top-down hierarchies into grassroots networks like those revealed through quantum physics’ understanding of energy and information waves and experienced daily by millions through social media.

With contributions from visionary thinkers such as futurist John L. Petersen, ex-CEO of Sanyo Tomoya Nonaka, media activist Duane Elgin, systems scientist Alexander Laszlo, and spiritual economist Charles Eisenstein, this book explores the future of education, spirituality, the media, economics, food, and planetary citizenship as well as the expansion of consciousness necessary to reach that future.

About the Author(s) of Dawn of the Akashic Age
Ervin Laszlo is chancellor of Giordano Bruno GlobalShift University and the founder and president of the Club of Budapest. The author of 89 books, he lives in Pisa, Italy.

Kingsley L. Dennis, Ph.D., is a sociologist, writer, and a cofounder of WorldShift International. The author of several books, including New Consciousness for a New World, he spends his time between Andalusia, Spain, and the United Kingdom.

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Personal conversation with Ervin Laszlo (part 1 of 6)

Personal conversation with Ervin Laszlo (part 2 of 6)

Part 2 of a personal conversation with Ervin Laszlo

Personal conversation with Ervin Laszlo (part 3 of 6)

Part 3 of a personal conversation with Ervin Laszlo

Personal conversation with Ervin Laszlo (part 4 of 6)

Personal conversation with Ervin Laszlo (part5 of 6)

Part 5 of a personal conversation with Ervin Laszlo

Personal conversation with Ervin Laszlo (part 6 of 6)

Part 6 of a personal conversation with Ervin Laszlo

Interview on New Leadership with Ervin Laszlo, Jean Houston and Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee. Recorded live October 2012.

This interview is part of the Global Oneness Day Summit, a global tele-series that celebrates the oneness of life and where you can learn from some of the world’s leading spiritual thought leaders and musicians who share their deepest wisdom, insights, prayers, music and meditations in celebration of our oneness. View here for about an hour of Interview on New Leadership

Bridging the gap between science and the world’s great spiritual traditions to move our worldview forward

• With contributions from 28 leading scientists and spiritual thinkers, including Michael Beckwith, Deepak Chopra, Larry Dossey, Amit Goswami, Stanislav Grof, Jean Houston, Barbara Marx Hubbard, José Argüelles, and Peter Russell

• Offers strategies to promote the fusion of science and spirituality

• Explores phenomena at the crossroads of science and religion, such as the nonlocal mind, conscious evolution, and quantum consciousness

Edited by Nobel Prize nominee Ervin Laszlo and WorldShift International cofounder Kingsley Dennis, this volume brings together 28 leading scientists and spiritual thinkers for a game-changing conversation on bridging the gap between science and religion. With contributions by Michael Beckwith, Deepak Chopra, Larry Dossey, Amit Goswami, Stanislav Grof, Jean Houston, Barbara Marx Hubbard, José Argüelles, Peter Russell, and many other prominent visionaries, this collection explores phenomena at the crossroads of science and religion, such as the nonlocal mind, conscious evolution, and quantum consciousness, and offers strategies to promote the fusion of science and spirituality and develop a multiperson planetary consciousness.

This book reveals higher consciousness as the bridge between science and spirit, passionate curiosity as the common ground among scientists and seekers, and the urgent need for an alliance between science and the great traditions of spiritual wisdom to move our worldview forward and meet today’s global challenges.

Ervin Laszlo is editor of the international periodical World Futures: The Journal of General Evolution and chancellor of Giordano Bruno GlobalShift University. The founder and president of the Club of Budapest and the author of 89 books, he lives in Pisa, Italy.

Kingsley L. Dennis, Ph.D., is a sociologist, writer, and a cofounder of WorldShift International. The author of several books, including New Consciousness for a New World, he spends his time between Andalusia, Spain, and the United Kingdom.

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Is there a role for spirituality in a time of crisis? Can it be of help in facing and eventually overcoming the crisis?

The answer, given in the four stupendous contributions to this Round of the Forum on Science & Spirituality, is a resounding YES. Crisis is both danger and opportunity. The danger is that the systems that drive our world take us to a point of no return where the world collapses around us; and the opportunity is to change the dynamic of the systems so they would take us toward a world that is more equitable, sustainable, and peaceful. To achieve this “worldshift” we need both dependable information and deep insight: the former from science, and the latter from spirituality. We can’t make it without either of them. But with both, we have a chance.

Gregg Braden and Bruce Lipton diagnose the nature of the crisis in which we find ourselves and highlight the nature of the insights we need to cope with it. Joanna Macy and Duane Elgin offer specific advice regarding the insights and the practices we need to face the crisis. Together they paint a concise yet clear and trenchant image of what is wrong with the world, and how we could change our thinking and actions to right it.

When writing is as clear and pertinent as this, there is no need to comment. We cannot point to one or another of the elements of information and advice it conveys, we would need to point to all of it. But there is no need to cite the whole of these worldshifting blogs, for they can be read here in their entirety. And read and read. And taken to heart and to mind, so they could inspire our heart and inform our mind. With inspiration coming from the great spiritual traditions, and information from the leading edge of the sciences, we can empower ourselves to change, both profoundly and urgently. Then we have a chance to change the world.

The world needs to change, profoundly and urgently. And nothing and nobody could change it but us. ~ Dr. Ervin Lazlo

Gaia Symphony V Ervin Laszlo

Ervin Laszlo is featured in clip from Gaia Symphony documentary film series by Japanese filmmaker Jin Tatsumura.

Description

The Akasha Paradigm is the new concept of the fundamental nature of reality. It suggests that there is a dimension in the universe that subtends all the things that exist in it. It not only subtends all things: it generates and interconnects all things, and conserves their trace. It is the network of the world, and the memory of the world.

The Akasha Paradigm, according to Dr. Laszlo, is the coming scientific “(r)evolution” that will change everything we have known about cosmos, life, and consciousness. It brings the realization that there is a deep dimension in the universe that generates and interconnects all things in the world. This gives us a new, encompassing concept of cosmos and consciousness, fresh meaning for our life, and reliable guidance for creating our future.

Recognizing that our “coherence” – connection with our interior and exterior world – is the key to our health and viability, Akasha paradigm-based science also offers a new concept of freedom and morality. “Using our freedom to our best advantage means doing the best to be a positive element in the web of life…”

Dr. Laszlo predicts that the Akashic (r)evolution will enable modern civilization to regain the coherence it has lost in society and with nature. Connecting with the Akasha and regaining our coherence is more than an option and an opportunity: “It is a fundamental precondition of creating a world where humankind is not the biggest part of the problem, but the conscious and decisive part of the solution. This is the practical meaning of the comprehensive worldview coming to light in science’s Akasha Paradigm Revolution,” according to Laszlo.

Merlian News Podcast Interview with Dr. Ervin Laszlo

In this interview, Dr. Laszlo discusses with Merryn Jose, the Akashic Field, Master’s Degrees, consciousness, holograms, time, The Club of Budapest and more.

Prof. Dr. Ervin Laszlo, founder and President of the Club of Budapest, was one of the first representatives in the area of systems philosophy and general theory of evolution. He published nearly 70 books translated into as many as 18 languages. In the course of his long academic career as a professor for philosophy, systems philosophy and future sciences, Dr. Laszlo worked in teaching and research at a variety of reputable universities in the US, Europe, and the Far East.

Dr. Ervin Laszlo’s titles and distinctions include a Ph.D. in “Lettres et Sciences Humaines” from the Sorbonne in Paris, an “Artist Diploma” from the Franz Liszt Academy in Budapest, an honorary medal from the Kyung Hee University in Seoul, the title of honorary doctor in economic sciences of the Turku School of Economics and Business in Finland, as well as the title of honorary doctor in the area of human sciences of the Saybrook Institute in San Francisco.

Laszlo worked as program director for the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). On August 08, 1999, he ws awarded an honorary doctorate by the Canadian “International Institute of Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics”.

Laszlo serves not only as President of the Club of Budapest and head of the General Evolution Research Group, which he founded. The former President of the International Society for Systems Sciences, Advisor of the UNESCO Director General, Ambassador of the International Delphic Council, member of the International Academy of Science, the World Academy of Arts and Science and the International Academy of Philosophy, also held and holds positions as a board member or extraordinary member of numerous international associations, including, at one time, the Club of Rome.


The rise of quantum consciousness could be the biggest step our species has taken since it came down from the trees. It would bring us to a new stage of species maturity and could also enable us to surmount the problems that threaten our life and our future.

But just what is quantum consciousness, or QC? I have spoken about QC in my previous posts, but the question merits a further, deeper look.

First of all, what is consciousness? The commonsense assumption is that consciousness is a stream of experience produced by the brain. As long as the brain functions, there is consciousness; when the brain shuts down, consciousness vanishes. This, however, is not necessarily the case. It could be that our brain no more produces consciousness than the radio produces the symphony that comes through its speakers. The symphony, too, disappears when the radio is shut down, yet we know that it’s not produced by the radio. Both the radio and the brain pick up signals, transform them, and display the result in our stream of conscious experience.

According to received wisdom, the things and events that make up our experience of the world originate in the world. People and things around us reflect light and make sound; for the most part they can be seen, heard, touched, smelled, or tasted. The corresponding signals reach our eye and ear in the form of waves in the electromagnetic field, in the air, and in the physical, chemical, and biological fields in and around our body. Our exteroceptive senses transform this information into nerve signals, and the signals are analyzed, sharpened, and interpreted by our brain. The result is the experience that appears in our consciousness.

This is the gist of the standard scientific explanation of our perception of the world, but it’s not complete. It’s incomplete not only because it fails to solve the age-old philosophers’ puzzle, how physical signals can transmute into intimately felt conscious experience (is this transmutation the work of the brain, or does the brain also transmit forms of consciousness from the external world?), but also because it doesn’t account for all the things that appear in our consciousness.

Some of the things that appear in our consciousness convey information about the world even though we cannot see how they could be based on sense-perceivable events. Happily, unlike the philosophers’ “hard problem,” this is no longer an unsolved puzzle. We now realize that our brain is not limited to capturing sense-organ-conveyed information, for it’s not just a classical biochemical system. It’s also a “macroscopic quantum system,” and such a system can “resonate” with the world. On the quantum level it can capture and process signals that far exceed the range of the signals available to the bodily senses.

The quantum-perception of the world is just as real as its sensory perception. Here, in brief, is why.

All things in space and time emit waves, and these waves interact with the waves produced by other things. They create wave interference patterns. Pressure waves in the air, and electric and magnetic waves in the EM field, diminish with distance, and the patterns they produce are limited to our immediate vicinity. However, quantum waves (waves that propagate in the nearly infinite virtual-energy domain that fills cosmic space) move instantly over any distance.

The kinds of interference patterns they create constitute quantum holograms, and quantum holograms are “entangled” with each other — they are instantly connected. As a result the information carried by one quantum hologram can be transferred to any other quantum hologram. Thus a system that can “read” the information in one hologram has access to the information carried by all. Our quantum-resonance-decoding brain could in principle capture information on anything and everything that creates quantum-interference waves in the universe.

Evidently, to capture this kind of information, our brain must have the corresponding receptivity. Scientists are now beginning to understand how quantum-hologram receptivity might be built into the brain.

It appears that quantum-level signals are picked up by microstructures in our brain’s cytoskeleton (the cytoskeleton is a protein-based structure that maintains the integrity of living cells, including neurons). The neurons in the brain are organized into a network of microtubules of microscopic size but astronomical number. There are about 1 x 1018 microtubules in the human brain, and “merely” 1 x 1011 neurons (though this number is still larger than the number of stars in the galaxy). With filaments just five to six nanometers in diameter, our network of microtubules — the so-called “microtrabecular lattice” — is believed to capture, process, and convey information.

Physicist Roger Penrose and neurophysiologist Stuart Hameroff claim that consciousness emerges from these quantum-level elements of the brain’s cytoskeleton. The microtrabecular lattice could be responsible for the quantum-receptivity of our brain, picking up, transforming, and interpreting information based on phase-conjugate resonance.

If this is the case, there is not just one mode of perceiving the world available to us, but two. We have what neuroscientist Ede Frecska and anthropologist Luis Eduardo Luna call the classical “perceptual-cognitive-symbolic” mode, based on information conveyed by our bodily senses, and we also have the “direct-intuitive-nonlocal” mode, enabled by the quantum receptivity of our brain’s microstructures.

In today’s world we tend to perceive the world in the classical mode, yet we could, and sometimes do, perceive aspects of it in the direct mode as well. However, our left-hemisphere-dominated perceptual mode represses information that doesn’t accord with our established ways of thinking. Only in spiritual, religious, or mystical experience does such information penetrate to our everyday awareness — and then, just fleetingly.

Yet our brain could operate in a more balanced way: the cerebral functions underlying our everyday awareness could be more embracing than those in the classical perceptual mode. Operating in this way is possible, and has already been achieved by a few people. This was the finding of British psychophysiologist Maxwell Cade, who in the 1970s examined the EEG patterns of more than 3,000 individuals. He had found four typical patterns, made up of specific combinations of alpha, beta, and theta waves. (He did not consider dreamless deep sleep, where delta waves predominate.)

Each combination turned out to be associated with a particular state of consciousness. The consciousness accompanying dreamful sleep, the state between waking and sleeping, and deep meditation each exhibits a typical combination of EEG waves. Dreamful sleep, the transitory state between waking and sleeping, and meditation all show pronounced alpha and theta waves. Our state of ordinary awareness is dominated by beta waves.

But Cade also found a “fifth state.” This is the remarkable state that comes to light in the EEG-portrait of accomplished healers. Cade called the consciousness associated with this state “awakened mind.” Here alpha and theta waves are strong, much as in the meditative state, but there are also beta waves. In some healers this state has become the norm, maintained not only during active healing, but also in everyday life.

Just as remarkably, in the fifth state the EEG waves are balanced across the left and the right hemispheres. This is important. The brain-state underlying ordinary consciousness is left-hemisphere dominated, and we know that the left hemisphere filters out experiences that do not mesh with our established beliefs and expectations. We also know that deep prayer and meditation activate the right hemisphere and tend to synchronize the two hemispheres.

A hemisphere-synchronized brain can operate in the direct quantum-resonance mode: as experiments I have witnessed myself demonstrate, expert meditators synchronize not only their own left and right hemispheres, but can also synchronize their left and right hemispheres with the synchronized hemispheres of others who meditate with them. And this synchronization occurs in the entire absence of sensory contact among the meditators. They can be in different rooms, different cities, even on different continents. (I reported on these experiments in my book, Science and the Akashic Field, and in other books.)

Unfortunately, a state of deep prayer and meditation is not functional in the everyday context: in most cases we need to sit with closed eyes, detached from the world around us.

A truly evolved consciousness would have the quantum-receptivity of deep prayer and meditation, but it would operate also in the everyday context. It would display a broad EEG wave-spectrum, embracing alpha and theta as well as beta waves. And it would show that the two brain hemispheres are highly coordinated, so that the information processed by the quantum-mode receiving right hemisphere is readily communicated to the sensory-information processing left. An evolved consciousness is wider and deeper than the everyday consciousness of people today, and more functional than the consciousness of those engaged in deep prayer and meditation.

In the past this kind of consciousness has been limited to exceptionally sensitive and creative people: to healers and poets, prophets and spiritual masters. In the future it could spread to a wider segment of the population. Humanity could be evolving its consciousness.

In closing, let us return to the example of the radio. Tuned to the right station, our radio can pick up and bring to us a great symphony. Imagine what our quantum brain could bring to us when, in the expanded and balanced mode, it would be tuned to the information encoded at the heart of the cosmos. This would be veritably a cosmic symphony. Of course, we could never capture all of it — only God could do that — but we could capture far more than we do today.

This would make us more empathetic as individuals, and more cooperative as citizens in our interactive and interdependent global community. The rise of these attributes in a critical mass could be the key to our continued survival. QC may be not only the next step in our species evolution; it could also be our collective salvation.
Ervin Laszlo on 2012
Dr. Ervin Laszlo, founder and president of the Club of Budapest, co-chair of the World Wisdom Council and author of over 30 books, speaks about the urgent need for a broad based “macroshift” to save the planet and save ourselves.

What is the Question?

Had he lived today, Hamlet would say with more conviction than ever: to be or not to be, that is the question. But it is not the skull of an individual that Hamlet would ponder, but the living Earth. Can we continue to “be” on this planet, or will we become extinct like the dinosaurs?

We are approaching a major watershed; a global tipping point. Our very survival is in question.

We are destroying the planet. The production of essential biological and physical resources has already peaked. Forests, species of fish, and coral reefs are damaged and disappearing, soils are impoverished by overcropping and by chemicals; diversity is reduced by genetic manipulation. The reserves of fresh water are diminishing; more than half the world’s population faces water shortages. And climate change threatens to make much of the planet unsuited for food production and habitation.

We are destroying the fabric of society. There is growing insecurity in countries both rich and poor and greater propensity to resort to terrorism and war. Islamic fundamentalism is spreading throughout the Middle East, religious fanaticism is growing in America, neo-Nazi and other extremist movements are surfacing in Europe.

The gap is widening between the wealthy and powerful and the poor and marginalized. Eighty percent of the world’s domestic product belongs to one billion people, and the remaining twenty percent is shared by five-and-a-half billion. One in three urban dwellers live in slums, shantytowns and urban ghettoes; more than 900 million are classified as slum-dwellers.

If we continue in this way, changing weather patterns will create drought and hurricanes, harvest failures, and rising sea levels. Famine and frustration will fuel terrorism and trigger wars. The delicate balance of our global interdependence will be torn apart. In the ensuing global collapse no country, no population will be spared.

To be or not to be is the question. If we are to “be” on this planet, we must change. Will we change—and will we change in time?

WHY We Must Change

If we are to change in time we must recognize the nature of our present condition; the roots of its unsustainability. The term “unsustainability” became current only in the last fifteen years, but the idea is not new. Already at the end of the 18th century Thomas Malthus published his famous treatise on food and population. He claimed first, that food is necessary to the existence of man, and second, that people will continue to reproduce as they always have.

“The power of population” wrote Malthus, “is indefinitely greater than the power in the earth to produce subsistence for man.” Inevitably, the time will come when population-growth outruns food-production. There will be more people than the planet can produce food for.

The “Malthusian catastrophe” is a simplified version of the tipping point we are now approaching. In question today is not only the production of food, but the whole basis of life on the planet. And the critical trend is not merely the growth of population—how many people walk the Earth—but first and foremost how much each person consumes, and what he and she does to the environment.

We have consumed more of the planet’s physical and biological resources in the six decades since World War II than in all of history before then. And we produce more waste than nature can absorb, and extract more resources than nature can regenerate.

This is not sustainable. In regard to food, for example, we know how much is sustainable: it is the produce of 4.2 acres of land for each person. But the average “ecological foot print” is seven acres today (and would be far more if the poorest countries would not have an untenably small footprint). Food of course is but one of the basic resources we need to live and to develop, and we are overusing and depleting most of them.

What will happen when we reach the limits of the available resources? When in the laboratory bacteria outrun the substances on which they feed, they die off. When mice approach the limit of their food-supply they become infertile; lemmings commit mass suicide.

But when a species with a high level of consciousness such as the human reaches the limits of its resources it doesn’t need to die off, commit suicide, or turn infertile. It can change its consciousness. With a changed consciousness it would look at the world differently and have different values and priorities. It could learn to live sustainably.

HOW We Could Change

Gandhi said, be the change you want to see in the world. In today’s world this means change your consciousness so others would change theirs. How can you do that? First of all, get rid of the old consciousness, and the values and beliefs that support it.

Ask yourself: do you believe that —

* Everyone is separate and rightfully pursues just his or her own interest.
* Life is a struggle for existence; only the fittest (meaning the wealthiest or most powerful) survives.
* In the ruthless competition for fitness the ends justify the means.
* The more money you have, the better you are (and very likely also the happier).
* People owe allegiance only to one nation and one company—the rest are strangers and competitors.
* If we want peace, we must prepare for war.
* Technology and efficiency are the answer, no matter what the question.
* For all intents and purposes the Earth is an inexhaustible source of resources and an infinite sink of wastes.
* The environment can be engineered like a settlement or a highway to fit our needs and demands.

If you hold such beliefs, you are part of the problem. But how can you become part of the solution? Here you must take a further step: adopt new thinking. As Einstein said, you can’t solve a problem with the same kind of thinking that produced the problem.

New thinking is not utopian or unprecedented; it is already emerging at the creative edge of society. In a number of “alternative cultures” people think and act in a more positive way. They share two fundamental beliefs. One is that the ancient saying “we are all one” is not just fiction but has roots in reality. William James was right: we are like islands in the sea, separate on the surface but connected in the deep.

The second belief regards the sphere of human responsibility. If we are one with each other and with nature, our responsibilities do not end with ourselves, our family, our country and our company; they encompass the human community and the biosphere. Living up to them is not charity. If we are part of humanity, and humanity is part of life on the planet, what we do to others and to nature we do also to ourselves.

When we shed obsolete beliefs and adopt new thinking, we change our consciousness and change ourselves. In these critical and unstable times that change can be the “butterfly” that triggers a storm. It could spread far and wide, and in the end it could change the world.

WHEN We Should Change

When you exclaim, “that’s the last straw!” you express a fundamental yet generally unknown principle. This is “nonlinearity.” If you load the back of a camel, you can add load after load and the camel will adjust and cope—until the load reaches the limit of the camel’s carrying capacity. Then, as the expression has it, just one more straw will break its back. A stepwise process that proceeded smoothly, “linearly” becomes suddenly abrupt, “nonlinear.”

This is what happens throughout nature. A living species can cope with changes in its environment—up to a point. When those changes accumulate, the stress reaches a critical point and the species dies out. Unless, of course, it mutates. In relatively simple systems critical points lead to breakdown. In more complex systems these critical points are tipping points: they can go one way or another. They do not lead inevitably to breakdown, they can also lead to breakthrough.

In 1989 a group of East German refugees received permission to cross the iron curtain to Austria. This was the small but critical shock to the system that broke its back—it was “the last straw.” In a matter of weeks the Communist-dominated East European states seceded from the Soviet Union, and less than a year later the Soviet Union ceased to exist.

The Soviet Communist Party, the most powerful political party in the world, not just lost power, it was actually outlawed. The States that comprised the Soviet Union did not disappear: after a period of chaos and near-breakdown, they managed to transform into more open societies.

In the last ten thousand years many societies, entire civilizations, reached critical tipping points. Once flowering cultures vanished, the Babylonians, the Sumerians, the Mayans, the Easter Islanders are examples. But others met the challenge: they transformed and survived. History testifies that the transformations were often profound.

Stone Age tribes lived in a mythological world: they communed with the trees, the animals, and the spirits of ancestors. People saw themselves as part of a mysterious but meaningful living cosmos. Ten thousand years ago this world transformed into the theocratic cultures of ancient Egypt, Babylonia, China, and India.

Here the unchanging laws of Sky-Gods governed human existence. As Hermes Trismegistos declared, “as above, so below.” Then, two and a half thousand years ago on the northern shores of the Mediterranean another culture arose, one that began to govern itself by human reason instead of inherited belief. This was the culture of classical Greece.

At the dawn of the modern age Western civilization brought yet another cultural mutation. The new culture combined elements from its predecessors, but was shaped above all by the belief in the power of reason pioneered by the Greeks.

Supported by the theories and observations of Galileo, Newton, and Copernicus, it developed a materialistic and mechanistic view of the world. This allowed Newton’s “classical physics” to join hands with traditional handicrafts. It produced a whole string of revolutionary technologies.

Today, however, in our age of global information, communication, interdependence and environmental degradation, the mechanistic-materialistic worldview has become obsolete and counterproductive. Its view of the world has been transcended in the sciences, but the technologies it generates and the behaviors it inspires are with us still. Many of them overexploit the environment and overmanipulate people. They produce more heat than light—more side-effects than benefits.

The civilization that dominates the contemporary world is no longer sustainable: if it is not to break down, it must transform. The quest for a quantum leap in human affairs is the quest to create a civilization that enables six-and-a-half billion people to live with dignity, in harmony with each other and with nature. Such a Worldshift is possible.

We have the insights, the technologies, and the necessary human and financial resources. What we lack is the will and the vision. To muster them we must change our consciousness. With a more up-to-date consciousness we could change our values and priorities—change ourselves and ultimately change the world.

A Worldshift is needed, and the time is short. The trends and processes that drive the contemporary world toward a critical tipping point are accelerating. The atmosphere is heating up, diversity is disappearing, the rich-poor gap is widerning, violence and unrest are growing, and the production of many of the resources needed for life and development have already peaked. Forecasts of basic tipping point have shortened from the rest of this century, to mid-century, to the next decade.

It may well be that the global tipping point will come already at the end of 2012, the much prophesied watershed in humanity’s tenure on the planet. It will certainly come within the lifetime of most of us. Whenever it comes, we must begin to act now, to ensure that it is not a prelude to breakdown, but a breakthrough to a more peaceful and sustainable world.

Ervin Laszlo, founder of The Club of Budapest and Chancellor-Designate of GlobalShift University (www.globalshiftu.org), author of more than 400 papers and articles and over eighty books of which the most recent are “Science and the Akashic Field” (2007) and “Quantum Shift in the Global Brain“ (2008), and co-founder and president of the board of trustees of the WorldShift Foundation.

Dr. Laszlo discusses living in an age of discontinuity, the deeper community he feels all religions point to, and his thoughts on a new marriage of science and spirit.

“Ninety-nine percent of the multi-cellular complex species since the Cambrian revolution are extinct. It doesn’t mean that humanity will not become extinct but we have a conscious mind therefore we can perhaps direct our own destiny.”

Biography

Dr. Ervin LaszloErvin Laszlo is recognized as one of the seminal founders of systems philosophy and general evolution theory. He has served as founder-director of the General Evolution Research Group and as president of the International Society for the Systems Sciences. A prolific researcher and lecturer, Ervin Lazlo has received numerous awards and academic commendations for his pioneering work. He was awarded the highest degree in philosophy and human sciences from the Sorbonne, the University of Paris, and the coveted Artist Diploma of the Franz Liszt Academy of Budapest, as well as four honorary doctorate degrees.

A versatile lecturer and researcher, Lazlo’s posts have included research grants at Yale and Princeton Universities, professorships for philosophy, systems sciences, and future sciences at the Universities of Houston, Portland State, Indiana, Northwestern University, the State University of New York, as well as guest professorships at various universities in Europe and the Far East. In addition, Laszlo worked as program director for the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR). In 1999 he was awarded an honorary doctorate by the Canadian International Institute of Advanced Studies in Systems Research and Cybernetics.

Ervin Laszlo has contributed widely to the field of evolutionary thinking through his writings, as author or editor of sixty-nine books, over four hundred articles and research papers, and six volumes of piano recordings. He currently serves as editor of the monthly World Futures: The Journal of General Evolution and of its associated General Evolution Studies book series and as president of the visonary Club of Budapest.

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