Kundalini Tantra: Song of Liberation by Jan Esmann

What lies beyond awakening? Pure being is basic and so is the so-called “awakening” everyone is talking about today. The contemporary neo-Advaitins will tell you nothing lies beyond, however that is not true. A whole universe of bliss and unity awaits you and this book will help you discover it. Today, Tantra has become equated with exotic sexual practices; however that is less than half of what Tantra originally meant and still means. Tantra is the science of realizing the Self while remaining absorbed in a rich worldly life. Tantra and kundalini are closely related. Kundalini is the creative dynamic energy of the Self, also known as Shakti. Shakti is Divine Grace and it lives in you as you. Tantra is the science of merging this Divine Grace into your small conscious awareness and becoming enlightened. This book is about enlightenment – not just “awakening” but real enlightenment.

Click here to browse inside.


The author of these pages could be said to be Jan Esmann, though that is just a form, a game, an old habit.

Anyway, here he is…

He is an artist by profession. You can see his paintings here
He also writes software (plugins for Photoshop) here

He has decided to share the love-bliss.
Nothing else matters.

What is written on this website is solely from experience.
All is an attempt to convey the state of love-bliss to you.

Nothing is from books or second hand knowledge.

Love-bliss never ending is the sole reality.

Fire in the brain…

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Four Levels of Witnessing During Meditation ~ Jan Esmann

Four Levels of Witnessing During Meditation

“Witnessing” designates a special state of consciousness or pure awareness where you are detached from something and observe it from a place that is untouched by it. Usually this something is a state of consciousness with which you were hitherto identified. The value of witnessing is threefold: First witnessing is the natural stance of the enlightened one, so temporary witnessing is a short experience of what it is like to be Self-realized. Second it is liberating from the drama of life to stand outside of it and witness it. Third there is catharsis in witnessing some drama one was hitherto identified with and thus, with the witnessing, has become free of with a release of emotional charge.

First type of witnessing concerns the mind. It is not necessarily first in a hierarchical epistemological order, but because it is often the first kind of witnessing people become conscious of experiencing; so it is merely the first worth mentioning in the order of how witnessing presents itself to a typical meditator. Once this kind of witnessing sets in, you will observe thoughts and impulses in the mind, that you would normally have taken to be you, as distinctly not you. The mind may become quiet, or it may become agitated, but that matters not since you are a detached observer to its contents and stirrings. The content of the mind may be banal or profound, it matters not in the least, for it is definitely not you and the important part of the experience is not the content of the mind, but the fact that you so distinctly experience it is not you. It is similar to looking in a mirror: You recognize yourself, but know it is not you. In witnessing even the notion that it resembles yourself is lost. You recognize that you once assumed it was you, but also that you no longer assume that at all. You are a witness, neither more nor less. One other significant aspect of this type of witnessing is that you become a witness to the observer of consciousness. Yes, the observer is not the witness! The observer is a natural stance the mind can adopt, but it is still within the mind, or rather, based on identification. The point from which you witness is devoid of any kind of identification what so ever. So first you step into the observer, then you witness the identification inherent in the observer and step into pure being, which is the only true witnessing stance.

Second type of witnessing concerns the emotions; the heart. This for some reason often comes after a period of witnessing the mind. Suddenly you become detached from some emotion and simply observe it (witness it). Such an emotion may be the ecstasy of immature samadhi, or it may be any banal emotion such as fear or joy. Usually detachment from the mind precedes this type of witnessing, but I am not sure it should always be so. You may witness the mind, or at least part of it, and there may be some joy in this witnessing, some pride perhaps. It takes a little experience of mind-witnessing to suddenly step out of this subtle pleasure and witness this pleasure also. It is for some reason more acceptable for people to admit they are not the thoughts in the mind. After all, anyone can think contradictory thoughts and thoughts they do not agree with; thus they can easily realise they are not their thoughts, but rather are the master or observer of the thoughts. But when it comes to emotions, people are more reluctant to disidentify from them. People are less in control of their emotions and they are generally driven by unconscious impulses. Thus there is something terrifying to many in witnessing emotions: Not only do you distance yourself from the manifest emotion, but you implicitly distance yourself from the unconscious sense of self from which the emotions spring. Distancing oneself from the mind is fairly easy, but distancing oneself from emotions is a little more difficult.

Third type of witnessing concerns the body. Not only the flesh, but in particular the field permeating and surrounding the body, which any experienced meditator will recognize immediately as a truer sense of presence in time and space than the physical body alone. The sense of being the body is more deep-rooted than the sense of being the emotions. After all: the emotions can change and be manipulated: you can change boredom to happiness and anger to love, but the body just stays the same (more or less). So it is easier to witness emotions than to witness body-identification. Just as it is easier to witness thoughts than to witness identification with emotions. Yet it is clearly possible to be a witness to not only the physical body, but to the field that permeates the body and reaches beyond it. Identification with the body first is identification with this field, then secondarily identification with the flesh. However, people generally have it the other way around since they don’t sense this field and only know the flesh. Most peoples field is no larger than the body, but any experienced kundalini-kriya meditator will instantly recognize what I am talking about, when I say your bodily presence is a field that permeates the body and extends some distance around it. This field can become very large, as in the case of a kundalini shaktipat master, where it can easily fill an entire room, or it can just be an inch larger than the body as in the case of a neophyte meditator without an awakened kundalini. Once your kundalini is awakened, if you meditate daily on shakti, your sense of this field will soon expand to about two or three feet around the body. Witness this. It is one thing to witness the physical body. In fact that is quite easy: anyone can imagine having lost a hand or a leg and still observe their presence in time and space. But to witness this metaphysical presence in and around the physical body is something quite different altogether. We are talking about being detached from your physical body and being detached from your metaphysical presence in time and space. This usually comes after detachment from the emotions and detachment from the mind. When this detachment and witnessing comes, you are literally located nowhere. There is no point anywhere at all which you can refer to as you. You are a witness to everything. This state is by nature very serene; though it may also be either just empty void or bliss; that depends on how far one’s meditation has progressed. With more experience it becomes more blissful. Only to the neophyte is it a scary void.

A fourth level of witnessing comes when you begin to see the Self in everything as Shakti and lovebliss. You then witness the physical universe as an overlay on the Divine. You sense the impersonal Divine creative impulse or intelligence or love behind everything, and this is of course Shakti and you sense a oneness with this. That makes you a witness to creation, to everything manifest, in fact to everything around you. This is the beginning of non-duality, of advaita. The plurality of creation begins to go away and you sense a oneness of Shakti in and as everything. There is still a duality of Self and other, but other is seen as one. In Self-realization, or what the neo-advaitins call “non-duality”, there is a duality between inner and outer and outer is seen as a plurality; so is the mind. In bliss consciousness, where this fourth kind of witnessing belongs, there are only two, two and nothing but two, no plurality: There is the unmanifest, which you are, and then there is the Shakti which appears as many outside you. Hence you witness everything. You are a witness to creation. Creation sustained by one Divine principle, which is love, bliss and Shakti in one.

Enlightenment 101: From Ignorance to Grace by Jan Esmann (Author)

Why a book about fallacies? Why be so negative and focus on what is wrong? Well, first of all because correcting wrong notions is an important part of any teaching, second because it becomes an excuse to propose correct understanding in the context of misunderstanding.

For this reason, I have examined common ideas and beliefs that have become widely accepted , but which upon closer examination are seen to be fallacious. Here are a few examples:

* Our only obstacle keeping us from fully awakening is our mind – therefore we must stop the mind.

* To attain Spiritual enlightenment, you must still your mind, detach from all the worldly distractions.

* The very entry point into the ego-less state or the enlightened state is the present moment. The ego can only be transcended by accessing the present moment.

* Our own intense emotions – even negative ones – can be a path for spiritual growth towards enlightenment.

* The common basic definition of enlightenment is that the enlightened one lives in total and constant contact with the divine, that this person’s ego is permanently dissolved in divine ecstasy, and that the person in all acts and words is a pure channel for the divine energy.

* Enlightenment is the understanding that I am everything that is.

* Enlightenment is a process of peeling back the many layers of the ego to experience your true radiant infinite Self.

Click here to browse inside.

Jan Esmann, born 1960, is an enlightened kundalinī shaktipāt master living in Copenhagen, Denmark, where he teaches, transmits and gives shaktipāt. The highest teachings are transmitted in silence during meditation or afterwards. Jan is not part of any tradition or represents a lineage. He has been giving shaktipāt since the mid 1980’s but did not fully emerge as a teacher until after 2006.

He has a MA in History of Modern Culture from Copenhagen University, and a B.Sc in Art-restoration from the Royal Academy of Arts in Copenhagen. He earns his living as an artist, a writer and a software developer.

Jan Esmann – 2nd Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

View Here on his previous book and intereview.

Lovebliss: The Essence of Self-Realization by Jan Esmann

The book answers the question what Self-realization is and which stages lie before and beyond. It contributes to the field of such books by focusing on lovebliss and the spiritual energy of the Self (Shakti), rather than simply pure being or the now. It is written solely from experience. Further it contributes by putting the insights of the first two thirds of the book into perspective with new readable translations (from Sanskrit with commentaries) of Yoga-S

M.A., B.A., B.Sc., born 1960. Jan has meditated since an early teenager with an awakened kundalini. He got Self-realized in 1985 and in 2005 reached the state of lovebliss.

Click here to browse inside.

Jan Esmann – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Jan was born 1960 and grew up in Bury, England. His parents were Danish. In 1967 the family moved to Denmark. Jan’s dad is an engineer and there was no spiritual influence from either parent. Yet Jan showed strong spiritual yearnings since an early age. Jan trained as an artist under the Danish painter Niels Hermann Wamberg; he also studied art restoration at the Royal Academy in order to learn the traditional craft. Jan also studied at the university and acquired an MA in history of modern culture.

Today Jan works as a full time professional artist and also has a software company developing photo retouching plug-ins for Photoshop.

After doing Transcendental Meditation and the TM Siddhi Programme for six years, Jan felt the need for a guru and found Gururaj Ananda Yogi whom he stayed with for three years. Then Jan’s Kundalini was so active, that he did not need any other guidance than what the Shakti gave, so he gave up on gurus and meditated by observing the inner Shakti’s workings. Following this, Jan began to be contagious and the Kundalini might spontaneously awaken in those that meditated with him. After some years, Jan met Amma and related to her as a spiritual master for about ten years. But again the Shakti guided Jan to meditate on his own and follow the inner guidance of the Shakti. Today Jan would describe his spirituality as being grabbed by Mother’s grace. The Divine Mother who resides in everybody as Kundalini Shakti and patiently waits to unfold as a vibrating field of love, bliss and grace.

View Jan’s Satsang on the common fallacies about Enlightenment HERE

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