Tag Archive: Life Story & Teachings of J Krishnamurti



We think that time is something mechanical and a fact. These great enlightened beings prove that time is just a product of the mind. You’ll also get great advice on how to live joyfully in the present moment.

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Eckhart Tolle: 00-07:33
Sadhguru Jaggi Vasudev: 07:37-12:22
Jiddu Krishnamurti 12:27-16:59
Bentinho Massaro 17:03-25:40
Mooji 25:45-29:06
Rupert Spira 29:10-36:13
Osho 36:18-40:02

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Jiddu Krishnamurti lived from 1895 to 1986, and is regarded as one of the greatest philosophical and spiritual figures of the twentieth century. Krishnamurti claimed no allegiance to any caste, nationality or religion and was bound by no tradition. His purpose was to set humankind unconditionally free from the destructive limitations of conditioned mind. For nearly sixty years he traveled the world and spoke spontaneously to large audiences until the end of his life in 1986 at the age of ninety.

Krishnamurti is a leading spiritual teacher of our century. In The First and Last Freedom he cuts away symbols and false associations in the search for pure truth and perfect freedom. Through discussions on suffering, fear, gossip, sex and other topics, Krishnamurti’s quest becomes the readers, an undertaking of tremendous significance.

Krishnamurti On Relationship

An excerpt from The First and Last Freedom

If there is real relationship between two people, which means there is communion between them, then the implications are enormous. Then there is no isolation; there is love and not responsibility or duty. It is the people who are isolated behind their walls who talk about duty and responsibility. A man who loves does not talk about responsibility, he loves. Therefore he shares with another his joy, his sorrow, his money.

Are your families such? Is there direct communion with your wife, your children? Obviously not. Therefore the family is merely an excuse to continue your name or tradition, to give you what you want, sexually or psychologically, so the family becomes a means of self-perpetuation, of carrying on your name. That is one kind of immortality, one kind of permanency. The family is also used as a means of gratification. I exploit others ruthlessly in the outside, and at home I try to be kind and generous. How absurd! Or the world is too much for me, I want peace and I go home. I suffer in the world and I go home and try to find comfort. So I use relationship as a means of gratification, which means I do not want to be disturbed by my relationship.

Thus relationship is sought where there is mutual satisfaction, gratification; when you do not find that satisfaction you change relationship; either divorce or else you move from one relationship to another until you find what you seek, which is satisfaction, gratification, a sense of self-protection and comfort… Relationship is sought where there can be security, where you as an individual can live in a state of security, in a state of gratification, in a state of ignorance, all of which creates conflict, does it not? If you do not satisfy me and I am seeking satisfaction, naturally there must be conflict, because we are both seeking security in each other; when that security becomes uncertain you become jealous, you become violent, you become possessive and so on. So relationship invariably results in possession, in condemnation, in self-assertive demands for security, for comfort and for gratification, and in that there is naturally no love.

We talk about love, we talk about responsibility, duty, but there is really no love; relationship is based on gratification, the effect of which we see in the present civilization. The way we treat our wives, our children, neighbors, friends, is an indication that in our relationship there is really no love at all. It is merely a mutual search for gratification. As this is so, what then is the purpose of relationship? What is its ultimate significance?

If you observe yourself in relationship with others, do you not find that relationship is a process of self-revelation? Does not my contact with you reveal my own state of being if I am aware, if I am alert enough to be conscious of my own reaction in relationship? Relationship is really a process of self-revelation, which is a process of self-knowledge; in that revelation there are many unpleasant things, disquieting, uncomfortable thoughts, activities. Since I do not like what I discover, I run away from relationship…

Therefore, relationship has very little significance when we are merely seeking mutual gratification but becomes extraordinarily significant when it is a means of self-revelation and self-knowledge. After all, there is no relationship in love, is there? It is only when you love something and expect a return of your love that there is a relationship. When you love, that is when you give yourself over to something entirely, wholly, then there is no relationship.

If you do love, if there is such a love, then it is a marvelous thing. In such love there is no friction, there is not the one and the other, there is complete unity. It is a state of integration, of complete being. There are such moments, such rare, happy, joyous moments, when there is complete love, complete communion. What generally happens is that love is not what is important but the other, the object of love becomes important; the one to whom love is given becomes important and not the love itself.

Then the object of love, for various reasons, either biological, verbal or because of a desire for gratification, comfort and so on, becomes important and love recedes. Then possession, jealousy and demands create conflict and love recedes further and further…

Relationship is self-revelation; it is because we do not want to be revealed to ourselves that we hide in comfort, and then relationship loses it extraordinary depth, significance and beauty. There can be true relationship only when there is love, but love is not the search for gratification. Love exists only when there is self-forgetfulness, where there is complete communion, not between one or two, but communion with the highest; and that can only take place when the self is forgotten.

Source: Ram Dass

LOOK INSIDE

A Reading of Jiddu Krishnamurti’s Book ‘The First & Last Freedom’.

Download, convert to MP3 & listen at your leisure.

One of very few people advocating taking individual responsibility for the state of the world.

Part 2: http://youtu.be/5itSiH_QKnk
Part 3: http://youtu.be/2Iw919AOS7Q
Part 4: http://youtu.be/YGW_bAIeNVQ
Part 5: http://youtu.be/45XHKcWp6Eg
Part 6: http://youtu.be/B2i6URNWIJ8

Three Essays about J. Krishnamurti published in 1995 by someone who had many meetings with him over a period of twenty years.

Ravi Ravindra, Ph.D., is a spiritual visionary, scholar, and leading international speaker on religion, science, and spirituality. A native of India, he emigrated to Canada and is Professor Emeritus at Dalhousie University in Halifax, Nova Scotia, where he served for many years as a professor in Comparative Religion, Philosophy and Physics. He was a Member of the Institute of Advanced Study in Princeton, a Fellow of the Indian Institute of Advanced Study in Shimla, and Founding Director of the Threshold Award for Integrative Knowledge. He has been a member of the Board of Judges for the prestigious Templeton Prize for Progress in Religion. Ravindra’s spiritual search has led him to the teachings of J. Krishnamurti, G. Gurdjieff, Yoga, Zen, and a deep immersion in the mystical teachings of the Indian and Christian classical traditions. He is the author of many books, including Christ the Yogi: A Hindu Reflection on the Gospel of John and Krishnamurti: Two Birds on One Tree.

LOOK INSIDE

Ravi Ravindra ‘A Voice Without A Form’ Interview by Iain McNay

Published on Sep 13, 2015

Ravi Ravindra ‘A Voice Without A Form’ Interview by Iain McNay
Author of many books including ‘Science and the Sacred,’ ‘Krishnamurti – Two Birds On One Three’ and ‘Heart Without Measure. – Gurdjieff work with Madam de Salzmann.’
Ravi was born in India in 1939. As a teenager he found himself reading the works of Swami Vivekananda and being ‘pulled by a longing to understand the mystery and significance of life. He was struck by one particular statement: ‘I am a voice without a form.’ It opened a door to a new dimension for him.
He talks about his time with Krishnamurti, ’Silence was a special delight to both of us, it was easy to understand each other’s thoughts and feelings.’
And then his 10 years with Madame De Salzmann who was head of the Gurdjieff work since the latter’s death in 1949. She stressed, ’attention is all that we have, that is to say, attention is all that we can bring. The rest is out of our control. A higher energy is there. The purpose of man’s existence on Earth is to allow the exchange of energy between the earth and higher levels of existence.’


Published on Aug 30, 2014
Krishnamurti – The Role of a Flower (Brockwood Park, 1985).

The provocative and penetrating philosophical classic of science and spirituality—a discourse between the revered spiritual leader Krishnamurti and renowned physicist Dr. David Bohm, exploring the origin of human conflict and what we can do about the barriers that stand in the way of insight and consciousness, now revised and updated with a new introduction and added dialogues.

The Ending of Time is a series of important and enlightening dialogues in which Jiddu Krishnamurti and Dr. David Bohm—men from vastly different backgrounds in philosophy and physics, respectively—debate profound existential questions that illuminate the fundamental nature of existence, probing topics such as insight, illusion, awakening, transcendence, renewal, morality, the temporal, and the spiritual. Along the way, Krishnamurti and Bohm explore a person’s relationship to society and offer new insights on human thought, death, awakening, self realization, and the problem of the fragmented mind.

The Ending of Time also refers to the wrong turn humanity has taken—a state that they argue can be corrected. Though they insist that mankind can change fundamentally, they warn that transformation requires going from one’s narrow and particular interests toward the general, and ultimately moving still deeper into that purity of compassion, love and intelligence that originates beyond thought, time, and even emptiness.
This updated edition, edited and revised in clear and engaging language, includes a new introduction and a conversation previously published separately which examines “The Future of Humanity.”

J. Krishnamurti & D. Bohm – The Ending of Time (Dialogue One)

Published on Jun 15, 2012
Dialogue 1 – The Roots Of Psychological Conflict

The Ending of Time (1 / 8)

Penetrating dialogues between the great spiritual leader and the renowned physicist shed light on fundamental questions of existence.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jiddu_Kr…
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Bohm

“In many cases David Bohm would be helping Krishnamurti to clarify, not so much Krishnamurti’s perceptions – he couldn’t do that – but the way Krishnamurti presented them, the language he used and the course of the discussion. Sometimes there were generalizations Krishnamurti would make that Dave would pounce upon and get him to refine.” F.D.Peat


This video is brought to you by the Krishnamurti Foundation at Brockwood Park, UK, which maintains an extensive archive of Krishnamurti’s original works and is actively engaged in the publication of this material in various forms. Also at Brockwood Park, the Krishnamurti Centre offers a quiet retreat for those wishing to explore Krishnamurti’s works, and Brockwood Park School and Inwoods Small School offer an education deeply inspired by Krishnamurti’s teachings.

For more information about Krishnamurti and the Krishnamurti foundations: http://www.jkrishnamurti.org

Jiddu Krishnamurti on Kundalini & Illumination

Question: “Some have had experiences of seeing lights, oneness with the universe, awakening of Kundalini. Are these not steps towards illumination?”

Krishnamurti is a leading spiritual teacher of our century. In The First and Last Freedom he cuts away symbols and false associations in the search for pure truth and perfect freedom. Through discussions on suffering, fear, gossip, sex and other topics, Krishnamurti’s quest becomes the readers, an undertaking of tremendous significance.

BROWSE HERE

J. Krishnamurti – On Freedom – An introduction to the teachings of J. Krishnamurti

Published on Jan 7, 2014
J. Krishnamurti – On Freedom – An introduction to the teachings of J. Krishnamurti

When Krishnamurti’s Notebook first became available in 1976, it was soon realized that it was a spiritually unique document giving his perceptions and experiences and describing his states of consciousness. It is a kind of diary but one that is little concerned with the day to day process of living, though very much aware of the natural world.

Krishnamurti, Jiddu born of middle-class Brahmin parents, was recognized at age fourteen as the coming World Teacher. Krishnamurti claimed allegiance to no caste, nationality or religion and was bound by no tradition. He traveled the world and spoke spontaneously to large audiences until the end of his life at age ninety. He said man has to free himself of all fear, conditioning, authority and dogma through self-knowledge and this will bring about order and psychological mutation.

J. Krishnamurti (1895-1986)
was a renowned spiritual teacher whose lectures and writings have inspired thousands. His works include On Mind and Thought, On Nature and the Environment, On Relationship, On Living and Dying, On Love and Loneliness, On Fear, and On Freedom.

Click here to browse inside.

Eckhart discusses selections from the revered teacher’s classic journal and shares some of the profound “passages into stillness” that Krishnamurti opens for us. Eckhart teaches us about how we are looking for something greater to come into our lives, we are continuously missing all the little things of which our lives really consist. Eckhart explains how Krishnamurti presents us with an invitation to join him in a state of consciousness.

Eckhart Tolle on ” Through the eyes of Krishnamurti
View Here

Krishnamurti – Why is there such Chaos in the World ?

Jiddu Krishnamurti (May 11, 1895 — February 17, 1986) was an Indian born speaker and writer on philosophical and spiritual subjects, and was widely considered as a World Teacher. His subject matter included: psychological revolution, the nature of mind, meditation, inquiry, human relationships, and bringing about radical change in society. He constantly stressed the need for a revolution in the psyche of every human being and emphasized that such revolution cannot be brought about by any external entity, be it religious, political, or social.

Krishnamurti was born into a Telugu Brahmin family in what was then colonial India. In early adolescence, he had a chance encounter with prominent occultist and high-ranking theosophist Charles Webster Leadbeater in the grounds of the Theosophical Society headquarters at Adyar in Madras (now Chennai). He was subsequently raised under the tutelage of Annie Besant and Leadbeater, leaders of the Society at the time, who believed him to be a “vehicle” for an expected World Teacher. As a young man, he disavowed this idea and dissolved the worldwide organization (the Order of the Star) established to support it. He claimed allegiance to no nationality, caste, religion, or philosophy, and spent the rest of his life traveling the world, speaking to large and small groups and individuals. He authored many books, among them The First and Last Freedom, The Only Revolution, and Krishnamurti’s Notebook. Many of his talks and discussions have been published. His last public talk was in Madras, India, in January 1986, a month before his death at his home in Ojai, California.

His supporters, working through non-profit foundations in India, Great Britain and the United States, oversee several independent schools based on his views on education. They continue to transcribe and distribute his thousands of talks, group and individual discussions, and writings by use of a variety of media formats and languages.


Washington D.C. 1st Public Talk 20th April 1985:

‘In The Present Is The Whole Of Time’

This is not a lecture on any particular subject according to certain disciplines, scientific or philosophical. Lectures are meant to inform on a particular subject or instruct, but we are not going to do that. So this is not a lecture, nor is it a form of entertainment. In this country especially, one is greatly accustomed to being entertained, amused. Rather in these talks, this afternoon and tomorrow morning, we are going to talk together about the whole of our existence from the moment we are born until we die.

In that period of time, whether it be fifty years, ninety years or a hundred years, we go through all kinds of problems and difficulties. We have economic, social, religious problems; problems of personal relationship, problems of individual fulfilment, wanting to find one’s roots in some place or other; and we have innumerable psychological wounds, fears, pleasures, sensations. There is a great deal of fear in all human beings, a great deal of anxiety, uncertainty, and a pursuit of pleasure, and also all human beings on this beautiful earth suffer a great deal of pain, loneliness. We are going to talk about all that together. And about what place religion has in modern life. We are also going to talk over together the question of death; and what is a religious mind and what is meditation; is there anything that is beyond thought and is there anything sacred in life, or is everything matter so that we lead a materialistic life?


Jiddu Krishnamurti & Swami Venkatesanada Can Another Dispel the Darkness in Oneself, from audio cassette (1969)

365 Daily Meditations on Freedom, Personal Transformation, Living Fully, and Much More, from the Man the Dalai Lama Described as “One of the Greatest Thinkers of the Age”

Jiddu Krishnamurti lived from 1895 to 1986, and is regarded as one of the greatest philosophical and spiritual figures of the 20th century. Krishnamurti claimed no allegiance to any caste, nationality, or religion, and was bound by no tradition. His purpose was to set humankind unconditionally free from the destructive limitations of conditioned mind….

CLICK HERE to look inside.

CLICK HERE for more of Krishnamurti’s works and teachings.

Conversation between Krishnamurti and Prof. Huston Smith, at the time, a professor of religion at M.I.T. Prof. Smith begins the conversation with the question ‘Is it Possible to Live with Total Lucidity?

Huston Smith: \’I am Huston Smith, professor of philosophy at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and I invite you to a conversation arranged by the Blaisdale Institute of Claremont, California, with Krishnamurti, who was raised by Annie Besant and the Theosophists to be a teacher, and who, though he discarded the mantle of Theosophy, did indeed become a sage of our century, one whose voice is heard as much by the youth of today as throughout the world for the last sixty years.

\’Krishnamurti, maybe this morning I will have only one question which in one way or another I will be coming back to in various ways. In your writings, in your speaking, time and again you come back to this wonderful little word, lucid and lucidity, but is it possible living as we are in this confused and confusing world, torn by conflicting voices without and conflicting tensions within, with hearts that seem star crossed and tensions that never go, is it possible in such a life, in such a world, to live with total lucidity? And if so, how?

Life Ahead presents lessons that move far beyond the traditional forms of education taught in most schools and colleges. Drawn from transcripts of talks given to Indian students, the book covers a wide range of universal topics.

In short, accessible chapters, Krishnamurti explores the danger of competition, the value of solitude, the need to understand both the conscious and the unconscious mind, and the critical difference between concentration and attention, and between knowledge and learning. Krishnamurti exposes the roots of fear and eradicates deeply entrenched habits of tradition, limitation, and prejudice. The life he holds forth requires a complete change of thought, even a revolution, one that begins “not with theory and ideation,” he writes, “but with a radical transformation in the mind itself.” He explains how such transformation occurs only through an education that concentrates on the total development of the human being, an education carefully described in this simple yet powerful book.

Click here to browse inside.

Jiddu Krishnamurti: Knowledge & Transformation

A Wholly Different Way of Living: San Diego, California 18th February 1974

1st Conversation with Dr. Allan W. Anderson ‘Knowledge and Transformation’

J Krishnamurti was born in South India and educated in England. For the past 40 years he has been speaking in the United States, Europe, India, Australia and other parts of the world. From the outset of his life’s work he repudiated all connections with organized religions and ideologies and said that his only concern was to set man absolutely unconditionally free. He is the author of many books, among them THE AWAKENING Of INTELLIGENCE, THE URGENCY OF CHANGE, FREEDOM FROM THE KNOWN and THE FLIGHT OF THE EAGLE.

This is one of a series of dialogues between Krishnamurti and Dr. Allan W. Anderson, who is professor of religious studies at San Diego State University where he teaches Indian and Chinese scriptures and the oracular tradition. Dr. Anderson, a published poet, received his degree from Columbia University and the Union Theological Seminary, he has been honoured with the distinguished teaching award from the California State University.

Life Ahead presents lessons that move far beyond the traditional forms of education taught in most schools and colleges. Drawn from transcripts of talks given to Indian students, the book covers a wide range of universal topics.

In short, accessible chapters, Krishnamurti explores the danger of competition, the value of solitude, the need to understand both the conscious and the unconscious mind, and the critical difference between concentration and attention, and between knowledge and learning. Krishnamurti exposes the roots of fear and eradicates deeply entrenched habits of tradition, limitation, and prejudice. The life he holds forth requires a complete change of thought, even a revolution, one that begins not with theory and ideation,” he writes, but with a radical transformation in the mind itself.” He explains how such transformation occurs only through an education that concentrates on the total development of the human being, an education carefully described in this simple yet powerful book.

Radical Revolution – J. Krishnamurti

We will see how very important it is to bring about, in the human mind, the radical revolution. The crisis, is a crisis of consciousness. A crisis that cannot anymore, accept the old norms, the old patterns, the ancient traditions. And, considering what the world is now, with all the misery, conflict, destructive brutality, aggression, and so on… Man is still as he was. Is still brutal, violent, aggressive, acquisitive, competitive. And, he’s built a society along these lines.

Jiddu Krishnamurti.

J. Krishnamurti, one of the most beloved and renowned religious teachers of the twentieth century, often taught his students that they must look at the state of the world, with all its violence and conflict, if they are ever to understand themselves. To turn away from world events was for him not to be alive to what life has to teach.

Facing a World in Crisis
presents a selection of talks that Krishnamurti gave on how to live in and respond to troubling and uncertain times. His message of personal responsibility and the importance of connecting with the broader world is presented in a nonsectarian and nonpolitical way. Direct and ultimately life-affirming, Facing a World in Crisis will resonate with readers today who are looking for a new way to understand and find hope in challenging times.

Jiddu Krishnamurti Crisis in Ourselves

Jiddu Krishnamurti was born on 11 May 1895 in Madanapalle, a small town in south India. He and his brother were adopted in their youth by Dr Annie Besant, then president of the Theosophical Society. Dr Besant and others proclaimed that Krishnamurti was to be a world teacher whose coming the Theosophists had predicted. To prepare the world for this coming, a world-wide organization called the Order of the Star in the East was formed and the young Krishnamurti was made its head.

In 1929, however, Krishnamurti renounced the role that he was expected to play, dissolved the Order with its huge following, and returned all the money and property that had been donated for this work.

From then, for nearly sixty years until his death on 17 February 1986, he travelled throughout the world talking to large audiences and to individuals about the need for a radical change in mankind.

Krishnamurti is regarded globally as one of the greatest thinkers and religious teachers of all time. He did not expound any philosophy or religion, but rather talked of the things that concern all of us in our everyday lives, of the problems of living in modern society with its violence and corruption, of the individual’s search for security and happiness, and the need for mankind to free itself from inner burdens of fear, anger, hurt, and sorrow. He explained with great precision the subtle workings of the human mind, and pointed to the need for bringing to our daily life a deeply meditative and spiritual quality.

Krishnamurti belonged to no religious organization, sect or country, nor did he subscribe to any school of political or ideological thought. On the contrary, he maintained that these are the very factors that divide human beings and bring about conflict and war. He reminded his listeners again and again that we are all human beings first and not Hindus, Muslims or Christians, that we are like the rest of humanity and are not different from one another.

He asked that we tread lightly on this earth without destroying ourselves or the environment. He communicated to his listeners a deep sense of respect for nature. His teachings transcend man-made belief systems, nationalistic sentiment and sectarianism. At the same time, they give new meaning and direction to mankind’s search for truth. His teaching, besides being relevant to the modern age, is timeless and universal.

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