Spiritual Life: Miracles & Magic – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Spiritual life opens our eyes to the miraculous, to the wonder and power of divine presence. We can also begin to access the magic of creation, life’s natural transformative power. In this talk, Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee explores the difference between miracles and magic, and how to recognize their hidden qualities.

LLEWELLYN VAUGHAN LEE || AWAKENING 

Separation and Union – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Published on Dec 4, 2016

Where the Two Seas Meet: Final Talks: Sufism and the West
with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Separation and Union

This talk explores the central Sufi theme of the journey from separation to union, and the longing of the heart that draws the wayfarer Home. This journey begins with the pain of separation—the lover separate from the Beloved—and finally reveals the secret of divine union, that the lover and Beloved were always united, are always one.

The One Quality Needed for the Path – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee


Published on Dec 4, 2016

The One Quality Needed for the Path

Love is the essence of Sufism, and all that is needed by the wayfarer. It is love that draws us Home. But we need to reclaim an understanding of love as a spiritual power that belongs to God and underlies all of creation.

From the event, “Where the Two Seas Meet: An Introduction to Sufism” with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

1. What is Sufism? with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee 2. Historical Beginnings of Sufism


Published on Dec 4, 2016

From the event, “Where the Two Seas Meet: An Introduction to Sufism” with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

This talk asks the question “What is Sufism?” and explores its esoteric nature.

Historical Beginnings of Sufism – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Published on Dec 4, 2016

From the event, “Where the Two Seas Meet: An Introduction to Sufism” with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

This talk is part two of An Introduction to Sufism and includes a description of Sufism’s historical beginnings and some of the early Sufi saints.

Reclaiming the Inner Worlds with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee


Published on Dec 4, 2016

An awareness of the inner worlds is an essential part of our human heritage—those worlds that are invisible to our physical sight, but exist in other dimensions of reality. However, this awareness has been censored by rational consciousness and our present culture. This talk explores our need to reclaim our connection to these realities, to return to the greater wholeness to which we belong.

“Consciousness & the Mind with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee”

Weaving a Web of Light — Sandra Ingerman & Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee


Published on Apr 4, 2016

From the event “Weaving a Web of Light” with Sandra Ingerman & Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee. February 26, 2006, Peacock Gap Country Club, San Rafael, California

Our light carries the secret of our divine purpose. When we connect together with the light of others we can weave a web of light that carries our shared power and purpose: the potential to help the world come alive with the wonder and magic hidden within it. We can help the heart of the world open and begin to sing.

Oneness & the World Soul with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee


Published on Mar 18, 2016

“Consciousness of Oneness” with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee was a series of events which were open to all with a sincere interest in the emerging global consciousness of oneness.

This talk, “Oneness and the World Soul”, was filmed on July 17, 2006 at the Mill Valley Community Center, Mill Valley, California.

Oneness & Life – Questions with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee


Published on Mar 18, 2016

This video, “Oneness & Life – Questions with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee”, was filmed on May 14, 2006 at the Mill Valley Community Center, Mill Valley, California.

“Consciousness of Oneness” with Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee was a series of events which were open to all with a sincere interest in the emerging global consciousness of oneness.

Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee: 1. The Magic of Creation: A Wish for the World 2. The Loss of Earth Magic


Published on Aug 24, 2015

In response to the audience question, “What is your deepest wish for the world?”

“If I could have a deepest wish for this world it would be that magic could return so that maybe the grandchildren of my grandchildren could say, ‘I have heard stories of a time when the magic was not present.'”

From the 2015 event “Spiritual Life: Miracles & Magic” at the Mercy Center in Burlingame, CA

Spiritual Life opens our eyes to the miraculous, to the wonder and power of divine presence. We can also begin to access the magic of creation, life’s natural transformative power. In this talk, Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee explores the difference between miracles and magic, and how to recognize their hidden qualities.

The Magic of Creation: The Loss of Earth Magic

My greatest sadness is the loss of earth magic that we have in our culture'”

From the 2015 event “Spiritual Life: Miracles & Magic” at the Mercy Center in Burlingame, CA

Spiritual Life opens our eyes to the miraculous, to the wonder and power of divine presence. We can also begin to access the magic of creation, life’s natural transformative power. In this talk, Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee explores the difference between miracles and magic, and how to recognize their hidden qualities.

Pope Francis’ Encyclical: Hearing the Cry of the Earth

By Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

The Earth “now cries out to us because of the harm we have inflicted on her.” So begins Pope Francis in his powerful and long-awaited encyclical on ecology. “The earth herself, burdened and laid waste, is among the most abandoned and maltreated of our poor.”

Pope Francis chose to be called after a saint for whom love for all of God’s creation was central to his life, and all creatures were his brothers and sisters. Speaking in the voice of this saint “who loved and protects creation,” he calls for a moral response to prevent the “unprecedented destruction of the ecosystem,”–that we urgently need to recognize the consequences of, and changes required in our way of life. He reflects on our abuse, the violence creating “the symptoms of illness that we see in the Earth, the water, the air and in living things.” And describing how climate change most adversely affects the poor, he combines ecological and social justice, that we “hear both the cry of the earth and the cry of the poor.”

The state of the Earth is our most pressing concern. Our present ecological crisis is the greatest man-made disaster this planet has ever faced: the signs of global imbalance, climate change, and species depletion are all around us. The monster of materialism is ravaging the Earth, its rapacious greed destroying the ecosystem, the fragile web of life that supports and nourishes all of life’s myriad creatures. We are part of a world of wonder and beauty which we are systematically sacrificing to feed our ever-increasing desires. We need to remember the simple wonder of the natural world around us, which St. Francis celebrated in his beautiful Canticle of Brother Sun:

Praised be You, my Lord, through Sister Mother Earth,
who sustains us and governs us and who produces
varied fruits with colored flowers and herbs.

Yesterday, when I went to my small vegetable patch to pick a few zucchinis for supper, I was once again amazed at the Earth’s generosity, how one plant could give so many vegetables. I had to look carefully under the spreading leaves to discover a zucchini unexpectedly growing almost too large. This is the sacred life that sustains us, part of the creation we desperately need to “love and protect,” just as it loves and protects us.

A central but rarely addressed aspect of this crisis is our forgetfulness of the sacred nature of creation, and how this affects our relationship to the environment. Pope Francis speaks of the pressing need to articulate a spiritual response to this ecological crisis and to “feel intimately united with all that exists.” Today’s world is dominated by a divisiveness that encourages exploitation and greed, and we need to return to a sense of wholeness, reflecting the living unity of all of creation and its myriad inhabitants.

The Earth needs both physical and spiritual attention and awareness, our acts and prayers, our hands and hearts. Life is a self-sustaining organic whole of which we are a part, and once we reconnect with this whole we can find a different way to live–one that is not based upon a need for continual distraction and the illusions of material fulfillment, but rather a way to live that is sustaining for the whole.

Each in our own way we can turn away from the patterns of consumerism that drain our money and our life energy. We can aspire to live a simpler life, learning how to live in a more sustainable way, and not be drawn into unnecessary materialism–filling our life with love and care rather than “stuff.” A simple meal of vegetables and grains cooked with love and attention can nourish our body and soul.

But, to speak more with the voice of St. Francis, the Earth also needs our prayers, our spiritual attention. Many of us know the effectiveness of prayers for others, how healing and help is given, even in the most unexpected ways. It can be helpful first to acknowledge that the Earth is not “unfeeling matter,” but a living being that has given us life. And then we can “hear its cry,” sense its suffering: the physical suffering we see in the dying species and polluted waters–the deeper suffering of our collective disregard for its sacred nature.

Pope Francis ends his encyclical with two prayers for our Earth. There is also the simple prayer of placing the world as a living being within our hearts when we inwardly offer our self to the Divine. In this prayer we remember the sorrow and suffering of the Earth in our hearts, and ask that that the world be remembered, that divine love and mercy flow where it is needed; that even though we continue to treat the world so badly, divine grace will help us and help the world–help to bring the Earth back into balance. We need to remember that the power of the Divine is more than that of all the global corporations that continue to make the world a wasteland, even more than the global forces of consumerism that demand the life-blood of the planet. We pray that the Divine of which we are all a part can redeem and heal this beautiful and suffering world.

Sometimes it is easier to pray when we feel the earth in our hands, when we work in the garden tending our flowers or vegetables. Or when we cook, preparing the vegetables that the Earth has given us, mixing in the herbs and spices that give us pleasure. There are many ways to pray, and we will each find our own way of tending the Earth within our own hearts. Just as the song of St. Francis calls us to praise the Earth, and to praise God “through all your creatures.”

As Pope Francis’s message reminds us, we each need to be the person who “loves and protects creation,” who remembers its sacred nature. We need to bring this song of love into our hearts and hands. Through our love for the Earth we can honor the call to climate action that comes from all faiths and from the single voice that is within all of humanity. We are all part of one living being we call the Earth and it desperately needs our love and attention.

Pope Francis urges people to combat climate change

Published on Jun 18, 2015

Carl Apple of the Catholic Diocese of Grand Rapids talks about Pope Francis’ recent stance on climate change. (June 18, 2015)

WITHIN THE HEART OF HEARTS: A Story of Mystical Love by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee


Within the Heart of Hearts is a journey into the mystical secrets of the heart. Designed to be read like a medieval book of hours, it uses prose, poetry, and images as a series of meditations on the stages of love’s mystical journey, from the initial experience of searching and the heart’s longing, to the ecstatic union with God, the lover united with the Beloved. This simple but powerful description of the Sufi journey reminds us of this living tradition of divine love.

Taking advantage of the format of an eBook, beautiful images speak directly to the soul, as do the poems that touch the heart. Here is the poetry of Rumi, Hafiz, Ibn ‘Arabi, and other Sufi masters placed within the context of the stages of the heart’s opening to God. Speaking the universal language of love, they allow each of us to feel the mystery, wonder, and bliss that belongs to the heart of hearts, the mystical secret that is hidden within us. They draw us deep within our own heart, where this intoxicating relationship of lover and Beloved takes place.

The popularity of Rumi has shown a thirst in the West for mystical love. This small book is a way to drink deeply of this wine of love, this tradition of lovers of God. Written by a contemporary Sufi, Within the Heart of Hearts is based upon a lived experience of the Sufi path and the inner experiences of the heart.

INTRODUCTION

The mystical journey is the greatest undertaking we can ever make, a journey inward into the heart of hearts, the mysterious core of our own being. On this journey we will encounter the depths of the darkness within us, of our fears and failures, and then a light and a love beyond imagining. We are taken by love to love, into the pain, the tenderness and then the unbelievable bliss of oneness with the divine. This is humanity’s greatest secret, hidden within each of us.

Since the very beginning there have always been those who are drawn to follow love’s calling, to make this impossible journey into the center of the heart. Some of these travellers came to be called Sufis (the name possibly referring to their white woolen garments, sûf, or an indication of their purity of heart, safâ). And some of them have left signposts of their journey—poems and stories of their heart’s opening, of the transformations wrought through the power and pain of the love along the mystical way. This little book, following some of those signposts, takes us through some of the stages of the journey on this secret path within the heart.

The poems in these pages point to an unfolding story. In its more familiar form, this is the narrative of the mystical journey that takes us from the experience of separation to the oneness of union with God—a journey, as those who have been taken on this path have told us, that passes through longing, struggle and pain, as well as bliss. But underneath this story lies another less-told one, not about a journey, but about a relationship.

Mystical life can be seen as an unfolding inner relationship between the soul and its Beloved. This relationship is always present, though it is hidden by life’s outer activity, by our ego, by the mind and its thoughts. It is a relationship of love: the love affair with the Beloved that is always alive in the core of our being, within the heart of hearts. Its story is the story of the mystic’s gradual opening, as she steps into the arena of the heart where this love affair is taking place, into a fuller and fuller experience of the love that is always present.

The poems that follow speak to this inner love affair. They tell of the nearness, the sweetness, as well as the suffering of love. This is the one story of divine love within all that exists, that spins the heart as well as the sun and the stars. And it is also our own intimate love affair, the passion of our own soul.

This book, with its poems and images, is designed to be experienced as a series of meditations, like a medieval book of hours. It is hoped that the reader will allow these meditations to unlock the secret of the hidden story of love they point to, so that once again we can hear what the Beloved is saying, come to know how much we are loved.

Chambers of the Heart – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee outlines the spiritual journey on the Naqshbandi Path as an unveiling of the chambers of the heart, from the awakening of longing to the annihilation in Absolute Truth.

This talk was given at the 2008 Sufi Conference. See also: vimeo.com/channels/suficonference and suficonference.org

1. Mary at the Empty Tomb: The Mystical Meaning of Two Scenes from the Christian Story 2. Women and the Mystery of Creation – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

From the event “For the Love of All Created by Thee” at the Mercy Center in Burlingame, CA. June 2014. DVD available here: http://goldensufi.org/dvd.html#llewellyn

Women and the Mystery of Creation – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

From the event “For the Love of All Created by Thee” at the Mercy Center in Burlingame, CA. June 2014

Prayer for the Earth – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee


Published on Mar 27, 2015
Recorded December 3, 2011 at the Mercy Center, Burlingame, California

Prayer is a response to a need. Our need. The Beloved’s need. And at this time, most pressingly, the need of the Earth.

From the book Prayer of the Heart: goldensufi.org/book_desc_prayer_heart.ht­ml
Category
Nonprofits & Activism

Rebirth, Miracles, and Magic ~ Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee Ph.D.

Amidst headlines of terrorists and other news of a global darkness, a quiet miracle is once again taking place. While blizzards batter the North East, spring comes here in Northern California–that magical moment when buds break open, when bulbs become shoots that become flowers, and color and fragrance return to a world made grey by winter. Trees blossom, magnolias flower purple and white. One can sense the pulse of the earth, and cannot help but feel the joy of life reawakening. Nature beckons us to be present at this moment when life begins again.

In the Christian story the moment of rebirth will come two months later, when in the miracle of the empty tomb Mary mistakes the risen Christ for a gardener, until he says those poignant words, “Woman why weepest thou?” This resurrection takes place every year at Easter, but it is not just a cyclical happening. Christ’s transformation symbolizes the mysterious moment when the eternal and temporal meet, when the Divine and human merge together. This is the transformation that can happen to each of us, when we reconnect and live the eternal dimension of our own soul, when we reawaken. Like the joy in springtime, it is always a miracle. And it is the deepest promise of being human.

The stories of the soul are all around us, how from the darkness life returns. It is simple and magical, nourishing us with the mystery of what it really means to be alive, to be awake. In today’s world dominated by the rational mind, by the apparent wonders of technology and science, we often forget this more primal wonder. We overlook our need for real magic. Without knowing it we do not welcome spring, we are not there at the empty tomb. Often as a culture we do not even recognize the lack of color in our lives, the lack of the soul’s fragrance.

And as our world spins out of balance, becoming more and more divisive, there is the danger that we will remain in the darkening world of winter without even realizing it. Caught in our culture’s dreams of materialism, we do not notice the magic we are missing. Just as we are destroying the fragile beauty of the outer world, so we are losing its inner mystery. But even if we do not feel the grief, we are all part of this global story of ecological devastation, of species that will never again be reborn in the spring, the trees whose sap will never again flow.

Where can we find the magic we need to free ourself from this self-destructive spell of consumerism, this soul-destroying pursuit of distractions? Magic is always present, just as the Divine is always present. It is there in the leaf opening, in the beating of the hummingbird’s wings. It is in the garden sparrows that everyday crowd around the bird feeder outside my window–such an ordinary miracle that I love it all the more. It is in the moment when the Divine unveils Itself and whispers or at times shouts to us. Sometimes, like for Mary, it becomes visible in our moment of grief, when the tears fall and our heart aches.

Sadly we only talk to ourselves. We no longer listen to the Earth or to life itself. As Thomas Berry says, “We have broken the great conversation.” But if we have courage and humility, if we kneel down close to the earth, we may hear how our whole world is crying, calling to those who are awake enough to hear it, strong enough to bear its grief. It is calling for us to work together, to bring the light of our own divinity, our compassion and caring, into the marketplace of life, to counter the pull of greed and exploitation.

More than any ideas of solving our problems or planning for the future, we need the power of magic–the ancient magic of the Earth, of its soul as well as its soil. And we need the miracle of love that is within our heart. Together we may be able to break this spell that is making a wasteland of our world. In cooperation with the Earth and all of its inhabitants we can weave the threads of a new story, which is also an old story. It is the most ancient story of the Earth and also the story of our own soul: the story of life regenerating itself, being born anew.

View Here on his book, ” Darkening of the Light: Witnessing the End of an Era

The Great Unspoken Tragedy of the Present Time – Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee

Excerpted from the talk ‘Spiritual Ecology’ given at the Mercy Center in Burlingame, CA on December 3, 2011.

Changing the Story by Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee [Updated May 16, 2014]


Published on Feb 27, 2014

“The only way to change the world is to change the story.”

The real stories that can change our lives come from the mythic, archetypal world of the soul. What are the stories that are needed at this time, to help awaken us to break the spell from the present story of consumerism, from our collective nightmare of materialism that is polluting our planet, destroying its sacred nature? How can we work to bring these transformative stories into our communities and our daily life? In this talk Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee addresses these important questions.

Recorded June 29th, 2013 at the Mercy Center, Burlingame, CA

The only way to change the world is to change the story.

We know only too well the story that defines our world today. It is a tale of consumerism and greed, sustained by the empty but enticing promise of an endless stream of “stuff” as the source of our happiness and wellbeing. We are finally coming to recognize the model of an ever-expanding economy on which that promise is predicated as an unsustainable myth, the domination of nature required to fulfill it as a desecration. All around us we are beginning to see the ravages of our culture’s whole-hearted embrace of the story: a beautiful world broken and dying, on its way to becoming a polluted wasteland.
We may even understand how this contemporary story is built upon an earlier one that took hold many centuries ago with the spread of monotheism, the story of a God who has withdrawn to heaven, to reign, apart and above, over an earth now deprived of its divinity and its natural magic. This is the story, still alive and feeding into our contemporary story, of a world in which spirit no longer lives in matter, in which the whole earth-realm of feminine power is suppressed to such a degree that it has almost been forgotten. It was and is a story of domination and patriarchal power, enshrined in the still-potent myths of the monotheistic religions.

And many of us now long for a new story, one that will restore to the earth its lost divinity and reconnect our souls to the sacred within creation, a story that will save our planet. Some have even already begun to articulate such a story: a beautiful and compelling vision of the entire universe as a single, inextricably interconnected, living whole, offering a dimension of meaning to our individual daily lives that arises from an understanding of our place in the whole.

But is this enough? How do we change the defining story of our world? Our collective culture celebrates its story of endless desires. It feeds us with its images that, though they can never nourish us, work like a drug for our minds and bodies, even as they exploit us and the earth. We have become addicts to material prosperity and the ego-centered greed that drives it. We long for a story that can give meaning to our daily lives and restore the health and beauty of our planet, but we remain caught in our tale of celebrating stuff.

Once we recognize how these stories hold us in thrall, entranced or entrapped, we can get a sense of their power. They are not just slogans created by politicians, corporations or even religions; they arise from the archetypal inner world where myths are born. We can recognize the archetypal dimension of earlier myths, the gods and goddesses of earlier eras, for example; some can see it in the more recent myth of a patriarchal, transcendent God living in a distant heaven.

The archetypal power of the present myth of materialism is harder to recognize because it is deceptive as well as seductive. And yet if one looks more closely one can see the archetypes at work here too. There the patriarchal myth of the domination of nature—a primal masculine power drive. But less obvious is the way in which the dark side of the rejected feminine has caught us in her web of desires. For what is materialism but the worship of matter, which is none other than the domain of the goddess? We are more present in the archetypal world than we dare acknowledge.

And now in our quest to redeem our civilization and the planet we speak about the need for a new story, a story that returns the spirit to creation and honors the primal oneness that is the web of life. Like our current story, this new one may also be based upon an earlier story: one in which all of creation was seen as sacred, with humanity just part of the woven tapestry of life—a story still lived by many indigenous peoples. But this emerging story is also evolutionary, drawing as well on the insights of particle physics into the underlying nature of creation to express its vision of the world as an interconnected whole, in which, like the symbolic image of Indra’s net, each part influences the whole. And this new story of creation connects the smallest particle with an ever-expanding cosmos of billions of galaxies—and does so in a way that bridges science and the sacred, understanding them as expressions of the same reality.

This is a compelling story for our time. But do we recognize from where this new story arises? Are we acknowledging and honoring the inner dimension from which all such world-changing stories are born? We know the vital need for a new story, but are we seeking to change life without honoring the archetypal forces at work, the gods and goddesses that still reign in the depths of creation—without recognizing the primal world that is life’s inner source? If a story is not born from the inner world it will lack the power to effect any real change.[i] It will speak just to our conscious selves, the surface layer of our being, rather than engaging us from the depths.

The stories of the past, the myths that shaped humanity, spoke to our individual and collective soul with the numinous and transformative power that comes from deep within. How many men have been called to battle by the archetype of the warrior or the hero? How many churches have been built on the foundation of the myth of redemption? The power of the archetypal, mythic world belongs to the river-beds of life that shape humanity.

But sadly, our present culture has distanced itself from this inner world. We are not taught to revere these underlying powers, nor do we know how to relate to them. Our contemporary consciousness hardly even knows of their existence. We live on the surface of our lives, unaware of the depths that are in fact the real determining factors. How many people when they go to the mall realize that they are worshipping on the altar of the dark goddess?

When our Christian culture banished the many gods and goddesses, and then when science declared that myths were idle fantasies, we became more trapped than we realize. The archetypal world does not disappear because we close our eyes, because we say that it does not exist. Its power is not diminished by either our ignorance or our arrogance. And yet we have forgotten how to access and work with this power. Unknowingly we have disempowered our self in a fundamental way. We have closed the door in our psyche and soul—we only look outward.

And now, when there is this vital need to rewrite the story that defines our lives, we are left with the inadequate tools of our conscious self. We do not know how to welcome the energies from the depths, to constellate the power we need to co-create a real story. We have isolated our self from the energy of life’s source we so desperately need. And so we are left stranded on the shore of our conscious self.

There is a new story waiting to be born, waiting to redeem the planet and nourish our souls. It is a story of a oneness that includes the diversity of creation in a self-sustaining whole, a story that can bring back the magic within nature that is needed to heal our damaged planet. It is a story of co-operation rather than competition or conflict. And it includes the mystery of life as well as the understanding that science can give us. It is also a new story, arising from deep within the psyche of humanity and the world soul at this moment in our and its evolution. We are not the sole creators of this story, because it is the story of life evolving, recreating itself anew, but we are needed to midwife it into existence. As with all births it needs to come from the inner to the outer world.

Only when we recognize the inner origins of this world-changing story can we participate in this birth. Only when we work together with the symbolic, archetypal world can its power and numinosity come into our existence and speak to the whole of humanity. Only then will this story be heard. We cannot afford the still-birth of new ideas that lack the life force that comes from the depths. We are called to return to the root of our being where the sacred is born. Then, standing in both the inner and outer worlds, we will find our self to be part of the momentous synchronicity of life giving birth to itself.

[i] Thomas Berry hints at this in his talk “The Ecozoic Era” (Eleventh Annual E. F. Schumacher Lectures October 1991). He speaks of a “creative entrancement” as well as the “psychic energies needed” for transformation:

My effort here is to articulate the outlines of a new mythic form that would evoke a creative entrancement to succeed the destructive entrancement that has taken possession of the Western soul in recent centuries. We can counter one entrancement only with another, a counter-entrancement. Only thus can we evoke the vision as well as the psychic energies needed to enable the Earth community to enter successfully upon its next great creative phase.

Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee’s radio interview on Sound of Transformation program with Dr. Michael Bernard Beckwit

Listen here to Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee’s radio interview on Sound of Transformation program with Dr. Michael Bernard Beckwithh, on KPFK Los Angeles, March 14, 2014

Michael Bernard Beckwith
Founder and Spiritual Director

In 1986, Michael Bernard Beckwith founded the Agape International Spiritual Center, a trans-denominational community highly regarded for it cultural, racial, and spiritual diversity, including thousands of local members and global live video streamers. “I greatly admire what you are doing to bring about the Beloved Community,” the late Coretta Scott King wrote to him, “which is certainly what my dear husband worked for and ultimately gave his life.”

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