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In Original Thinking, Glenn Aparicio Parry delves into the evolution of Western thought to recover the living roots of wisdom that can correct the imbalances in our modern worldview. Inspired by groundbreaking dialogues that the author organized between Native American elders and leading-edge Western scientists to explore the underlying principles of the cosmos, this book offers a radical revisioning of how we think.

Asking questions such as, Is it possible to come up with an original thought?, What does it mean to be human?, and How has our thinking created our world today?, Parry challenges us to consider many of our most basic assumptions. To think originally–as in thinking new thoughts that have never been thought or said before–is according to Parry, largely an illusion. So, too, is the idea of linear human progress. Most of us have traveled far from our ancestral lands, and in so doing, lost connection with place, the origin of our consciousness.

Original Thinking offers a radical revisioning of how we think and what it means to be human. It invites us to reintegrate our hearts with our heads and to expand our self-imposed narrowing of consciousness. In doing so we reconnect with the living, original source–nature and her interconnected elements and cycles–and embrace the communion of old and new, rational and intuitive, and masculine and feminine. Ultimately, Parry shows us how to create the tapestry of truly original thinking and to restore thought as a blessing, as a whole and complete transmission from Spirit.

Contents
PART ONE (ORIGIN): Is it possible to come up with an original thought?
Chapter 1. Original Thought, Time, and the Unfolding of Consciousness
Chapter 2. Looking Backward to Go Forward
Chapter 3. Wheels Within Wheels
Chapter 4. It’s About Time

PART TWO (DEPARTURE): What does it mean to be human?
Chapter 5. Purpose, Potential, and Responsibility of Being Human
Chapter 6. Rational Thought and Human Identity
Chapter 7. Re-thinking Language
Chapter 8. Beyond Rationality
Chapter 9. A Tale of Two Directions

PART THREE (RETURN): How has our thinking created the world today,
and what is emerging?
Chapter 10. The Essence of Thought
Chapter 11. To Make Thought Whole Again
Chapter 12. To Think Without Separation
Chapter 13. Re-Thinking the “Dismal Science”
Chapter 14. Toward An Original Economics

PART FOUR (RENEWAL): Can education promote the renewal of original thinking?
Chapter 15. Education as Renewal
Chapter 16. Childhood and Education
Chapter 17. Higher Education
Chapter 18. A New (and Ancient) Vision
Chapter 19. A Vision for Higher Education


Glenn Aparicio Parry, PhD, also given the name Kizhe Naabe (Ojibwe for Kind-Hearted Man), is a writer, educator, international speaker, entrepreneur, and visionary whose lifelong passion is to reform thinking and education into a coherent, cohesive whole. The founder and past president of the SEED Institute, Parry is currently the president of the think tank The Circle for Original Thinking. He earned his BA in Psychology from Allegheny College and went on to earn both his MA in East-West Psychology and his PhD in Humanities with a concentration in Transformative Learning from the California Institute of Integral Studies. Parry organized and participated in the groundbreaking Language of Spirit Conferences from 1999-2011 that brought together Native and Western scientists in dialogue, moderated by Leroy Little Bear. He is a member of the Institute of Noetic Sciences and the Theosophical Society as part of a lifelong interest in bridging the arts and sciences. An avid outdoorsman, he now makes his home in the foothills of the Sandia Mountains in Albuquerque, New Mexico, with his wife Tomoko, dog Sunrise, and cat Haru (Japanese for spring).

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Original Thinking Book Trailer

Published on Apr 6, 2015

ORIGINAL THINKING: A RADICAL REVISIONING OF TIME, HUMANITY, AND NATURE
by Glenn Aparicio Parry


Published on Sep 3, 2015
This presentation by Igor Kufayev, entitled ‘Transformative Power of Beauty’, is part of unofficial video recording at the Science and Nonduality (SAND) Conference in Italy, May 28th 2015.

Website: http://www.igorkufayev-vamadeva.com


Published on Sep 4, 2015
A comparison of an infant’s experience with awakened experience.


Published on Sep 1, 2015

Excerpt from four-day immersion with Igor Kufayev in Holland, June 2015


This collection of timeless poetry celebrates the eternal spiritual truth within each heart. Since ancient times, this hidden essence has been symbolized by the number 108. There are 108 earthly desires, 108 human feelings, 108 delusions, 108 beads in the traditional meditation mala, and 108 sacred poems in this anthology.

Filled with crystalline wisdom from the great poets, sages, saints, and mystics, this selection of poems is a collective expression of universal heart-filled wisdom. The poems span a wide range of cultures and civilizations — from India to Europe, Japan, and the Middle East — and each one offers a unique perspective about the path to awakening.

Some of the poems express belief in a higher being. Some convey instantaneous awakening. Others lead the reader down a disciplined path of contemplation.

Ordered according to a broad interpretation of the heart-centered chakra model, these remarkable poems guide the reader toward realization and offer timeless jewels of insight to spark awakening and enrich spiritual practice.


Ravi Nathwani
was born into a business family in East Africa and raised in India in the Vaishnav Hindu tradition, in which Hindu rituals were integrated into daily life from a very young age. He has become a modern-day messenger of a variety of Vedic studies through his lectures and workshops. Since 1998, Ravi has been teaching at Tufts University. He also teaches Wisdom Yoga and Buddhist meditation at JFK University in California. In the Bay Area, Ravi leads satsangs and meditation groups and teaches the Yoga Sutras of Patanjali and the Bhagavad Gita in Yoga teacher trainings. Ravi has an MBA from Boston University and has lived in Bombay, Boston, and London.

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Literature Book Review: Mala of the Heart: 108 Sacred Poems by Ravi Nathwani, Kate Vogt, Jack Kor…

This is the summary of Mala of the Heart: 108 Sacred Poems by Ravi Nathwani, Kate Vogt, Jack Kornfield.

Oneness Perceived is a sutra for our culture and our time. It conveys the viewpoint of enlightenment in a clear and systematic way. In the spirit of pure inquiry, the author develops a comprehensive theory of consciousness and uses it to illuminate religion, mysticism, science, and psychology. The book returns psychology to its earlier roots in phenomenology, taking introspective and subjective experience as the starting point and not as something to be discarded because it is “unscientific.”


DR. JEFF EISEN is psychological intuitive and enlightenment therapist as well as a philosopher, writer and educator. He has a PhD in Psychology and is certified in both Psychoanalysis and Clinical Hypnotherapy. He has been a Professor of Psychology at several universities and a publisher at CRM Books (Psychology Today). Eisen’s books include, Playing 20 Questions With God: A Cosmic, Self-Repair Manual, and Oneness Perceived, A Window Into Enlightenment, among others. Dr. Eisen’s original system of clearing or unlearning is called PsychoNoetics. He practices and teaches in the larger context of Omnius, http://www.omnians.com an integral transformational path. You can schedule phone sessions and sign up for workshops through the Omnius web site.

VIEW HERE

Dr. Jeff Eisen

The topic of this conversation was PsychoNoetics. Eisen writes on this website http://www.drjeffeisen.com…;

“With PsychoNoetic clearing it is now possible to not only gain insight into the shadow material of your ego, but to let it go, to completely disassemble it. It is now possible to release your memories, let go of your attachments, clear your emotions, deconstruct your belief systems, accept instead of deny and connect in love instead of separate in ego. In this way you can transform your personal hell into a universal heaven.”

http://www.drjeffeisen.com


Published on Aug 30, 2015

This presentation by Igor Kufayev, entitled ‘Truth Be Spoken: Four Levels of Speech – Consciousness Expressing Itself as Sound, Language and Form’, is part of unofficial video recording at the Science and Nonduality (SAND) Conference in Italy, May 27th 2015.


Published on Sep 1, 2015

Excerpt from four-day immersion with Igor Kufayev in Holland, June 2015
Website: http://www.igorkufayev-vamadeva.com

In the follow-up to Elisa Medhus’s My Son and the Afterlife —“a heartfelt, deeply moving story” (Eben Alexander, New York Times bestselling author of Proof of Heaven)—her son Erik tells his astounding story directly from the afterlife, describing in detail his death, transition, and spiritual renewal.

My Life After Death begins on the tragic day when Erik Medhus took his own life. What follows is a moment-by-moment account of the spiritual life he discovers on the other side—told for the very first time in his own words as channeled by medium Jamie Butler and then transcribed by his mother Elisa.

Overflowing with his signature honesty and candor, Erik describes more than just a visit to the afterlife. He personally walks us through the experience of dying, transitioning into spirit form, and reveals a detailed look at the life awaiting us on the other side.

In this intimate and provocative memoir, crucial questions will finally be answered, including: What does it feel like to die? What is it like to become a spirit? Why and how do spirits communicate with the living? Is there a heaven? Ultimately, Erik’s story provides the answers that will help readers find solace and remove the fears surrounding death, showing that love has no boundaries and life does not truly end.

Elisa Medhus, MD, is a physician and mother of five who has practiced internal medicine for over thirty years. She is the author of three award-winning parenting books, including Raising Children Who Think for Themselves and Hearing Is Believing, and has lectured on parenting for schools, parent groups, and corporations. After the death of her twenty-year-old son Erik, Dr. Medhus began journaling her grief in her blog ChannelingErik.com and wrote the successful book My Son and the Afterlife. She lives in Houston, Texas.

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Elisa Medhus on MY SON AND THE AFTERLIFE

Learn more about The My Son and the Afterlife at http://books.simonandschuster.com/My-… Until her son Erik took his own life at the age of twenty, Dr. Elisa Medhus never believed in life after death. As an accomplished physician, she placed her faith in science. All of that changed when Erik began communicating from the other side.

Dr. Elisa Medhus about connecting with her son in the afterlife

Published on Jun 25, 2015

Dr. Elisa Medhus never believed in life after death. As an accomplished physi­cian, she placed her faith in science. All of that changed after her son Erik took his own life and then reached out from the other side. Through an energy healer named Jamie Butler, Elisa was able to communicate with her son. This resulted in the wildly popular blog, “Channeling Erik”, and also the book “My Son and the Afterlife” and the upcoming “My Life After Death”.

Purchase the book: “My Son and the Afterlife” here:
http://wisdomfromnorth.com/elisa-medh…

Dr. Wayne W. Dyer has been teaching people to live better lives for nearly 40 years. First coming from the perspective of a psychologist and then as a spiritual teacher, his books, recordings, and talks have influenced millions. After four decades, his core message has become incredibly simple and equally profound: You are the same as your Source. You are God. Because you come from God, you cannot be anything but God. All of Dr. Dyer’s current work boils down to helping people realize this fundamental truth and overcome obstacles to living lives that fully recognize it.

Dr. Dyer is the most popular teacher in the mind/body/spirit genre. He has written more than 30 books, and his National Public Television specials have raised more than $120 million for public television. The most recent vehicles of his teaching include the 2007 book Change Your Thoughts, Change Your Life: Living the Wisdom of the Tao, in which Dr. Dyer reflects upon the verses of the Tao Te Ching and their wisdom in living a life of balance and alignment with nature; his new bookExcuses Begone!, in which he examines how to overcome memes—the viral, self-defeating thinking habits that prevent you from living your life’s purpose; and the new feature film The Shift, which stars Dr. Dyer, Portia de Rossi, and Michael DeLuise in a spiritual movie about discovering that life purpose.

We sat down with Dr. Dyer in Tampa, Florida, and talked about current topics both metaphysical and mainstream, from the law of attraction to laws about gay marriage; from the impact of Lao-tzu to the impact of Barack Obama; and from how we are failing future generations to how we can best serve them.

Hemachandra: Starting with The Secret, which has reached such a wide audience, the emphasis in today’s popular understanding of the law of attraction is predominantly about material wealth. What are the consequences of that kind of skew to this teaching?

Dyer: First of all, I think the law of attraction has been misstated. You do not attract what you want. You attract what you are. That’s how the law of attraction works.

Twenty-five centuries ago in ancient China, Lao-tzu said there were four virtues. If you live them—if you live in a place of God-consciousness—the universe will give you God-consciousness. If you live in a place of ego-consciousness, though, the universe will give you more of that.

One virtue is reverence for all of life. You revere all life. You never kill, you never harm, you never wish harm, and you never have thoughts of harm directed toward yourself or others. Another virtue is natural sincerity, which is manifested as honesty. Just be honest with who you are. Don’t pretend to be something you’re not. Don’t be a phony. Walk your talk. That’s how God works, so doing it is emulating how Source works. The third virtue is gentleness, which manifests as kindness toward all others.

The fourth virtue, which is relevant here, is supportiveness. If you say to the universe, “Gimme, gimme, gimme,” which is what a lot of the work around the law of attraction says because of a misinterpretation, then the universe gives you back what you offered out. You get more “gimme, gimme, gimme.” “Gimme” means you don’t have enough. You have a shortage. The universe just keeps giving you more shortage because of what you’re thinking and saying.

If, on the other hand, you say to the universe again and again, “How may I serve? How may I serve? How may I serve?” and you live a life of constancy reflecting that principle, the universe will respond back, “How may I serve you?”

Hemachandra: With an approach centered on lack and need, even if you are getting things, the feeling of shortage keeps coming back to you. So no matter what you get, you still always feel the need, don’t you?

Dyer: Exactly, and that’s why I say you don’t get what you want, you get what you are. When you live the virtues—when you live in that place of God-consciousness—all these rules we have about cause and effect, beginnings and ends, don’t have any impact or relevance. As Joel Goldsmith said, in the presence of the God realized, the laws of the material world do not apply.

That’s why people who live steadfastly at a place of God-consciousness can perform miracles. They can create. They can make virtually anything happen. From the space in-between, that last inch is the critical inch you have to take to reach that place. Every once in a while, I get to that place of God-consciousness, and miracles do happen.

Hemachandra: I’ve heard you say that it’s not you, Wayne Dyer, creating when you write in the early hours of the morning. It’s Source. What does it feel like to have Source expressing itself through you?

Dyer: How can I put words on it? It’s magical. It’s blissful. It’s awe. Rumi said sell your cleverness and purchase bewilderment.

It’s just being bewildered—being in that state of pure awe. When I’m on purpose—when I’m allowing Source to come through—it’s always there. At those times, I’m not focused on any ego sense about how much I’m going to make, how well a book is going to do, whether people are going to buy it, or any of that. I just go to a state of awe and gratitude—I’m deeply, profoundly grateful—and it just works. The first words out of my mouth every morning are “I thank you.” Rumi said if there’s only one prayer you say every day, make it “thank you.”

Thank you, thank you, thank you—I start out every day that way. It puts you into this place where you know you’re connected to something big. Lao-tzu speaks about not living the Tao but letting yourself be lived by it. You surrender to it. You just say, “Whatever you want to do with me, I’m cool with it.” You know that you’re being used for wonderful, divine, great, and beautiful pleasure and purpose.

Hemachandra
: Your first book came out in 1971, nearly forty years ago. How has the way you teach, even more than the content of what you teach, changed?

Dyer: I used to teach psychology, and I don’t do that anymore. I teach spirituality. And the way that I teach now is just by listening. I listen a lot.

For years I taught in universities and high schools for classes of 30 or 35 students. Now I teach in very large venues with thousands of people in the audience. I used to have notes. Now I just let go and let God. I just allow it to come, and I didn’t do that before. I never even used the word “God” for twenty or twenty-five years. Now it just rolls out of my mouth all the time.

Hemachandra: Your new feature film is called The Shift. Do you hope to reach a new audience with the film, and do you think the film will then serve as an entryway to other parts of your work?

Dyer: The answer to both questions is yes. It’s an enormous opportunity to get a message out to people who may be less likely to read and listen to CDs—to people who would otherwise not be exposed to the most important teachings on the planet. These teachings are about how can we get along and survive as a people—how we can love each other, be kind and decent, serve each other, and be compassionate. Unfortunately, there aren’t many messages like that in the popular culture.

A Course in Miracles
says there are two emotions: love and fear. Everything that’s love can’t be fear, and everything that’s fear can’t be love. You’re either in one or the other. Almost every time you turn on the television set, you’re in fear. You get aligned with fear. When you’re aligned with fear, instead of with God-consciousness, you just keep attracting more fear-more stuff to be afraid of, more shortages, revenge, anger, wars, killing, and disease.

I think that the film is a great opportunity to reach a large audience of people who learn visually and who want to be entertained. In the film, three couples whose lives are in ambition, who are focused on accomplishment and achievements, transform their lives into meaning—into living lives of purpose and service. When I agreed to make the film, I insisted that it be produced in a high-quality way. I’ve seen films made around this subject matter in which the message was good, but the quality wasn’t.

I think it will be an entryway to my work, but I’m not really attached to that outcome. I don’t really care. I’m sixty-eight years old. What I do now will be read by unborn generations for hundreds, perhaps thousands, of years. For me, it’s not about my work—that is, it’s not about Wayne Dyer’s work, how much money I make, how well I do, or how well my products do. It’s more like what the Native Americans say: When we walk upon the earth, we always place our feet very carefully upon the ground, because we know the faces of our future generations are looking up at us from below, and we never forget them.

I think as a culture today we’ve forgotten them. This work is a way to help us remember them. It’s a way for us not only to find meaning in our individual lives, but to extend that approach all across the planet. Because if we don’t, we won’t have a planet.

Hemachandra: What did the process of doing a film look like for you? What was it like taking direction as an actor? And if the film is successful, is acting something you would consider doing again to help spread the message?

Dyer: I would certainly be open to it, but I wouldn’t have said that during the first week or two of the shoot. It’s very grueling work.

When I was asked to make the film, I decided that it was like taking on a new career at the age of sixty-eight. I’ve never acted before. And taking direction is not something I’m very good at. I’ve always known who I am and what I was going to do, and I’ve always just done it.

But here I totally surrendered. I said to myself, “I know nothing about this.” I went with a completely open mind and also with a knowing that anything in my life that I’ve ever put my mind to, I’ve been able to accomplish. Attitude is everything, so I’ve always picked a good one. I went in believing that I could do this, and I was not going to be part of a film in which it looked like I was reading my lines.

The filmmakers created this brilliant concept of a film within a film, so I’m really just being myself. In the first two or three scenes, I was trying to remember my lines from the script. I kept going over them, and I didn’t like the way it was coming across. Then I surrendered. I said to myself, “You know all of this stuff. You’ve been teaching it forever.” So, in the process of just relaxing and letting go, I forgot about the script. Instead, I tried to get a picture of what we were doing in a scene, and I said whatever words came to me. They were similar to the script, but I never followed the script. I just allowed myself to go.

I did two new things in August that I’d never done before. One was this film—being an actor and taking direction. The other was becoming a minister and marrying Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi, who is in The Shift. It was just wonderful to open myself up and learn new things.

I’m sixty-eight, but I wasn’t going to make excuses. I just finished writing a book called Excuses Begone! this past week. Excuses—the idea that you’re too old to do something, that you’re too scared or too busy, or that it’s going to be difficult—are not aligned with Source, with what I often call God-realization. When I put my attention on something, when I’m aligned with Source and doing something for the right reasons, then I’m given the guidance. So, throughout that entire film, it doesn’t really look as if I’m acting at all. Part of it was my surrendering, and as big a part of it was the very talented director, Michael Goorjian, who allowed me to do that and filmed all of the scenes with that perspective.

Hemachandra: Given that you’ll likely reach people who have never encountered your work before in books, online, or even in your public-television specials, did you conceive of a specific message you wanted to impart to this unique audience, beyond a broader introduction to metaphysical principles and teachings?

Dyer: Yes, I did. The message is don’t die with your music still in you.

You came here with something to do. You are part of a universal consciousness, and there are no accidents in it. In your true essence—not the false self, not the ego part of you, but in the true essence of who you are—you are infinite and you have something very profound to accomplish while you’re here. Otherwise you wouldn’t be here.

Find it. Pay attention to it. Listen to the callings. See the clues, the cues. See the alignments, whatever they might be, no matter how absurd or bizarre they might seem to everyone around you. Ignore their concerns. In the movie, the music inside for one character, for example, is art—a woman had always wanted to draw but was so obsessed with just fulfilling her duties, as a mother and so on, that she never had time for it.

Fulfilling your duties as a mother is one thing, but if you have a calling inside that says there’s also something else, don’t ignore that. Don’t die with your music still in you. Don’t die with your purpose unfulfilled. Don’t die feeling as if your life has been wrong. Don’t let that happen to you. That’s the bigger message.

Hemachandra: And I think that’s a nice transition to talking about Excuses Begone! and the idea of people overcoming the excuses they tell themselves that prevent them from fulfilling their dharma, their true purpose. It seems as if the two projects really dovetail, as does so much of your work these days.

Dyer: Oh my goodness, it sure does. I just finished the manuscript this past week, and it’s the most remarkable thing I’ve ever done. I wrote Change Your Thoughts, Change Your Life: Living the Wisdom of the Tao about what to think about and how to align with the Tao. Excuses Begone! is really a channeled work on how to go about changing long-established thinking and behavior habits and beliefs—what are called memes—that stop you from realizing your divine magnificence.

No longer what your belief about yourself is—if you’ve always been poor, if you’ve always been overweight, if you’ve always had rotten relationships, if your luck hasn’t been good, if you don’t attract into your life the things you want, if you’ve always been shy or always been aggressive—whatever it is and however long you’ve held it, the belief that you can’t change it is not aligned with Source.

Source says you can be anything. You can do anything. You’re infinite. Ego, with all its different excuses, says, “I can’t do that.” So this work means really realigning yourself with Source.

Excuses Begone! is a very spiritual book. I didn’t think it was going to be when I started writing, but I couldn’t escape it. The book wrote itself. I wrote it without any outline, and it turned out to be 510 handwritten pages. From February 1 until the end of September 2008, I wrote every single day.

Hemachandra:
If you’re raised with pessimistic, negative beliefs—those very excuses you’re talking about—that’s your world. That’s your understanding of reality. So, in a fundamental way, abandoning those unhealthy beliefs means abandoning your life. That requires a real leap of faith, doesn’t it?

Dyer: You’ve already abandoned everything you’ve ever known. All you have is now. That’s all there is. The whole idea that you’re tied to what you’ve been is nonsense.

I use the metaphor of a boat going down the river. When you’re standing at the back of the boat, looking at the water as you’re going along at forty knots, what you see there is the wake. The wake is the trail that’s left behind. You can ask the question, “What’s making the boat go forward?” It can’t be the wake. The wake can’t drive the boat. It’s just the trail left behind. It can’t make the boat go forward, any more than the trail that you’ve left behind in your life is responsible for where you’re going now in your life. The belief that whatever you’ve been is what you have to be is a meme—a mind virus.

There is no past. That’s another illusion. Everything that’s ever happened to you, to me, to anyone in this world, happened in the present moment. That’s all there ever is. So your relationship to life isn’t your relationship to your past, it’s your relationship to the present moment.

How good are you at being in the now? Most people tell themselves these excuses—I’ve always been this way, how can I possibly change, this is my nature, I can’t help it—that are just memes. They’re belief systems that keep you from being able to become all that you are intended to become. They’re impediments to your reaching God—realization, or Tao-centeredness. People lose track of their purpose, because they are so back there—living in their past.

Byron Katie speaks about this: Who would you be without your story? Carlos Castaneda used to say if you don’t have a story, you don’t have to live up to it. So get rid of your story.

Hemachandra:
What’s the first step toward abandoning habituated ways of thinking?

Dyer: I don’t think in terms of steps very often. When you write articles it’s nice to have them like that, but life doesn’t happen linearly. But I think it’s just recognizing that who you are is not any of the stuff that you have. It’s not any of the things of the ego.

Coming to that awareness is a very hard thing for most people to do—but that’s an excuse. If you tell yourself it’s too hard, then you won’t take it on. But right now, for most people, it’s almost an impossibility to do so, because they’re so attached to “I am what I have”; “I am what I do”; “I am what my reputation is”; or “I am all of this material stuff.”

Getting past that just means having the recognition, as Pierre Teilhard de Chardin said, that you’re not here as a human being having a spiritual experience. It’s the other way around: You’re here as a spiritual being having a temporary human experience. You come to know your essence—that you came from an energy, a vibrational frequency. Everything in the universe is frequencies. Even things that look solid are all frequencies, all movement. Einstein said nothing happens until something moves. This chair I’m sitting in is moving. It may be hard to imagine, but if you took a microscope and really got in there, you’d see the spaces and a lot of particles all in movement.

Most of us are totally, completely misaligned. God-consciousness is up there, while most of us live down here at ego-consciousness. But what’s up there can’t recognize what’s down here. If you were a frog, and you were trying to see what this room is like, what would you see? Just try and picture it. A frog’s eyes are out on the sides, and they see from different frequencies altogether. What we see would just come across as a blur to a frog. A frog can’t recognize what it isn’t. Neither can you. And neither can God.

So, if you’re not aligned with God, it’s hard to recognize yourself as being of God. The way that you get aligned with God is by being like God, being like Source, being like energy. That means understanding how the Tao works—how God works.

It’s about giving. It’s about serving. It’s about allowing. It’s about kindness. It’s about gentleness. It’s about sincerity. It’s about reverence for all of life. It’s about those virtues that Lao-tzu wrote about. When you’re living in those virtues, then you get into the law of attraction. It starts working for you because you’re not working for it. You’re doing it for its own sake. But most of us are almost always in ego-consciousness down here, not God-consciousness up there.

Hemachandra: What’s the most common meme? And are they any different for men than for women?

Dyer:
I think the most common meme is that it’s too difficult to change. It’s too risky to change. My nature doesn’t allow me to change.

When you’re thinking that, you’re not understanding what your nature is. All of us come from this place of well-being, love, and kindness. But we’ve taken on these other things, and we think that they’re our nature. Our nature really is to be like God. That’s what we were like when we were babies.

A minister in Maui told me about a boy who was five years old, and his mom came home with a brand new baby. He was a rambunctious five year old, and his parents were afraid that he might do some damage to the baby. They kept a close eye on him so he didn’t get too rough—kick the baby or think it was a doll to play with or something.

They were watching the boy talk to his little baby brother, who was just a few days old. And he said, “Would you please tell me what God is like? I think I’m forgetting.” This little five year old knew that the baby was a piece of God who hadn’t yet had a chance to forget.

If there’s a distinction between men and women, I don’t pay attention to it. Honestly, I don’t see it. I think all of us are part feminine and part masculine. The Tao is considered feminine, like the mother and the mother’s breast. It’s the feeding without asking anything in return. It’s the offering, the giving. I’m sure sociologists can come up with distinctions about what’s different between men and women, but for every example you can give about what a woman does, you can come up with an opposite example of other women who don’t do that. Those are more artificial distinctions, I think.

Hemachandra: So, just to be really clear, what’s the biggest thing people need to learn in order to help them get beyond the excuses?

Dyer: They need to know that they are God. We mostly do not recognize that. We’ve lost the sense of our own divinity.

We think that we’re separate from God, but we can’t be. We must be like what we came from, and we came from an infinite, loving, kind, beautiful Source. We’ve forgotten that.

So, you have to recognize that God isn’t something outside of you—a cosmic bellboy to whom you pray in order to get this or that if you do the right things. Those kinds of understandings are all ego talk. Everybody—you, me, Osama bin Laden, Adolf Hitler—we all came from the same Source. Then we took on these egos and began to practice all kinds of things based in not having reverence for life, whereas that which is God has reverence for all life.

All excuses are nothing more than misalignments with God. Just imagine the great creative Source needing an excuse. It doesn’t have any concept of, “I’m too busy. I’m too old. I’m too afraid. Things are going to take too long.” Source doesn’t work like that. The Tao does nothing, Lao-tzu writes, but it leaves nothing undone.

Hemachandra: People make excuses, and it gets in the way of the achievement of their dharma. What’s your dharma?

Dyer: The purpose of life is to be happy. I don’t think it’s any more complicated than that. It’s also important not to interfere with anybody else’s right to do the same.

We just need to practice that. It’s the Golden Rule. But most people have a different golden rule—that they, as the gold, make the rule. That’s what they think the Golden Rule is, and so they revere money and power and all of that.

But just the ability to be content—to be in a state of bliss, to enjoy life—is all any of us want, really. You can’t accumulate anything, because anything you get you have to give away. We all know this. We watch our bodies go through the aging process. We know we came in here with nothing, and we know we’re going to leave with nothing. There’s nothing to own. There’s nothing to get.

The only thing you can do with your life is give it away. The best, happiest moments in your life are always when you’re giving something away.

Hemachandra: If the dharma for all human beings is doing good and being good, it still manifests itself differently for different people. Are the differences in our dharmas based on choices we make—on free will—or is our specific dharma something with which we’re born?

Dyer: We’re all individualized expressions of God, of oneness. We do have personality differences. Everyone who has had more than one child knows that they come in with personalities. The moment they come in—some come in screaming, some sleep through that first night and stay peaceful the rest of their lives—you see the differences. It gives me pause to think about past lives and those kinds of things.

Free will is something that people struggle with so much, but it’s very simple to me. Carl Jung said at the same moment you’re a protagonist in your own life making choices, you also are the spear carrier, or the extra, in a much larger drama. You’ve got to live with these two opposite ideas at the same time.

Basically we’re living with opposite ideas all the time. We’re sitting here in this room, and we see each other’s bodies. We know that we are physical manifestations—physical beings. We also know that each of us in this room is a nonphysical being. We have minds. We have thoughts that are happening right now. You can’t see them. You can’t touch them. There’s no substance to them. They have no boundaries. You can’t get a hold of them.

So there’s a part of you that you can get a hold of, and there’s a part of you that you can never get a hold of, and those are opposite things. Who are you? Which one are you? You are combinations of opposites.

The Bhagavad Gita speaks about combining the opposites—about fusing, or melting if you will, into the oneness. I think we have a free will, and at the same moment we don’t. We have to live with that. It doesn’t make sense intellectually, but that’s because our intellect is always trying to come up with a logical, rational explanation for things. To do that, it puts labels on things. But once you label something, you’ve got twoness. You’ve got the label, and you’ve got what you’re labeling. And there is only oneness in the universe, even though we artificially believe in twoness.

Hemachandra: Let’s talk about the memes a little bit more. How do political and cultural shifts happen when there are collective memes, or seem to be—

Dyer: —oh, yes, there are millions of them—

Hemachandra:
—and is there a tipping point at which you have enough people changing their thinking that a societal meme actually shifts?

Dyer: Oh, yes, and there are lots of examples. It wasn’t very long ago that when you called to make an airline reservation, you had to decide whether you wanted to sit in a smoking or nonsmoking section. It seems like ancient times, doesn’t it? But it was only two decades ago. That’s a cultural meme that shifted in a positive direction. No one on an airplane ought to have to breathe in noxious fumes because other people decide that they have an addictive habit. But that wasn’t the case for many decades. There was a tipping point: Enough people began to think that smoking on planes was unacceptable that it finally became unacceptable.

In fact, when I was growing up, everybody smoked, including me. When I was 14, I started. We all did it. That was just the way it was. And now there’s a stigma attached to it. It’s a big shift.

When I was in high school in the 1950s, the percentage of women in medical school was 1 percent. Now it’s 50 percent—one out of every two. The same is true with law school. Those are major meme shifts that have taken place. When I was in high school—I’m really aware of this because I’m going to my fiftieth high—school reunion next Saturday—if you were black and lived in Detroit, and you wanted to drive down to Florida to go on vacation, you had to plan to drive all the way through, because you couldn’t stop in a hotel all the way through South Carolina, North Carolina, and Georgia. We can’t even fathom such a thing now, can we?

Irving Wallace wrote a bestselling novel, The Man, in the 1960s about a black man becoming president of the United States. We thought that such a possibility was thousands of years in the future. Next month Barack Obama, a black man, may well be elected president of the United States. Some people may still have some difficulty with the idea, but that’s a major cultural meme shift.

In physics we call these things phase transitions. When enough electrons within an atom get aligned and a critical mass is reached—as soon as you hit that hundredth monkey, as soon as you hit the one—you have phase transition, and all the rest of the electrons automatically make the change.

So, my mission—what I teach and what I believe in-is that you just get yourself aligned with God—consciousness. If we teach enough people to do it—if enough of us ultimately get there-then we’ll start electing leaders with this kind of consciousness. We’ll start seeing these kinds of shifts taking place. I think it works both collectively and individually.

It works in reverse, too. When I was a kid at 16, sneaking into a burlesque theater in downtown Detroit was a big thrill. Today, in every hotel room in America, you can turn on the television and see hardcore pornography. So the shifts can go both ways, and it’s incumbent on us as leaders of the spiritual community to get as many people as possible to really begin to think in God-realized ways.

Hemachandra: Speaking of meme shifts, you mentioned that you recently married Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi. What did performing the ceremony mean to you, and what kind of minister did you become to marry them?

Dyer: I don’t even know what kind of minister I am. I went on the Internet. I think it cost twenty dollars, and I had to fill something out. And then my publisher helped set it up.

It’s just another hoop you have to jump through. What difference does it make who marries you, and why does it have to be a person with a religious affiliation? I’m now licensed in 47 states!

Hemachandra: Another career path for you?

Dyer: It could be! Seriously, I’ve had a lot of people already write and ask me if I’ll do it for them. I’m not interested in doing that, but the marriage was very momentous—talk about a meme shift! We’re talking about a legal marriage between women in the state of California.

I wrote a beautiful letter as my gift to them when I performed the ceremony. I said this is not just a ceremony to celebrate two people falling in love, loving each other, and being married, but it’s a galvanizing moment. It’s something for everybody who ever lived with those kinds of thoughts and feelings inside of them. Even as young girls, they probably couldn’t even have imagined that they would one day have the same rights as everybody else, which had been limited not on the basis of what choices they made but just on how they were created. That was a ceremony for all of the people who lived in shame, who lived lives of quiet desperation, who lived in the closet, and who now have role models of people who have done this.

They’re voting on the legality of this kind of marriage in many states, and I don’t know what in the world they think they’re voting on. Victor Hugo said you can stop an invasion of armies, but you can never stop an invasion of ideas. There’s nothing more powerful than an idea whose time has come. It wasn’t until 1920, four years after my mother was born—and she’s still alive and healthy—that women were given the right to vote. Now it’s hard even to imagine that for the greater part of the history of our country fifty percent of the population was not allowed to vote.

The same thing is true for same-sex marriages. It was always a stigma to be homosexual. In every school you knew who the gay guys or girls were. People ridiculed them, and they lived in the shadows. They don’t have to live in the shadows anymore.

Hemachandra: Some of the major meme shifts you talked about were top down. Political leaders seized the day and provided brave, bold leadership. But in this area, it seems to me, that hasn’t happened. We haven’t had a single major-party presidential nominee, for example, be willing to come out in favor of gay marriage.

Dyer: I know. But they do support it. They’re just not honest. And honesty—sincerity—is one of the four virtues that Lao-tzu writes about. Again, the four virtues are reverence for all of life, gentleness, supportiveness, and natural sincerity. That’s God—consciousness. They’re afraid they’re going to offend people they want to have vote for them-and I don’t respect any of them for that.

Why wouldn’t somebody have the same legal rights as everybody else in our society? What is that about? I don’t even understand them putting that on the ballot. So if fifty-one percent of the people say it shouldn’t happen, it’s not going to happen? You can get fifty-one percent of the people to say just about anything—to say let’s bring back slavery, or all Mexicans should be slaves, or something absolutely crazy like that. Does that mean we do it?

None of that makes any sense to me, but negative beliefs about homosexuality are a meme. And that cultural meme is shifting.

Woodrow Wilson was the president of the United States in 1920, and he was made a fool of—his wife almost divorced him—because he wouldn’t support women’s suffrage. He was president during World War I, but I look back upon him as a coward. Because he knew the right thing to do—the right of women to vote was an idea whose time had come a long time before then, when a lot of women were put into prison or persecuted because they fought for it.

Thoreau is one of our great heroes. He said civil disobedience is something for which every enlightened citizen is responsible. Forget the laws. If the laws don’t make sense, if they run contrary to your conscience, you have to disobey them.

Hemachandra: Metaphysical teachings are reaching more people than ever before. How do you think your work, along with the work of other modern spiritual teachers, is reshaping society, given its impact on so many people today?

Dyer: It’s pretty strong ego stuff, isn’t it, to think that it’s me doing it. Honestly, I don’t think that at all.

I don’t really pay attention to society. I don’t even think such a thing exists. We have sociologists, and they study all of these kinds of things—the collective habits of our people and so on. But I don’t believe very much in it. I just go where I’m sent and I do what I’m told. I listen to the highest voices within me. I don’t feel the least bit courageous. I don’t feel like I deserve any medals. I don’t feel that I’m any more special than anybody else who’s out there.

Like a lot of us, sometimes I’m preaching to the choir, and sometimes my voice doesn’t even get heard at all. Sometimes I think that what I’m writing now might not even have an impact for the next three or four generations. Sometimes I sit there and write, and I think, “It’ll be two hundred years before they get what I’m writing about.”

If I sat down in any room, I’d have as much to learn from anybody in that room as they’d have to learn from me. If I sit down and just really listen and hear who you are and what you have to say, what you fears are, what your ambitions are, and what your vision is, I have just as much to learn from you as you have to learn from me.

I feel very blessed that I have an intellect, that my mind is strong and my body is strong, and that I’m being used in this way. I’m grateful for it. But I also know that it’s really not me.

Hemachandra: You spoke earlier about the native proverb concerning what we owe our children and their children. What do you think we owe future generations, and how are we doing?

Dyer: Oh, we’re doing terribly. We’re leaving these unborn children trillions of dollars of debt, which is just horrific. We’re leaving nuclear weapons—enough to end life as we know it—all over the planet. We’re leaving a legacy of violence and killing and guns.

Why do we even make guns? I’m not against gun control. I’m against guns, period. I’m against anything at all that is used as an instrument of death. Why would we manufacture such a thing? Why would we have a business that does it? Why don’t we figure out a way to disarm ourselves totally? Thousands of children are killed by handguns in the United States each year. What is that about? What are we doing? We accept that? And we accept the presence of these weapons that are in silos and on submarines and airplanes? If any madman gets hold of them—and certainly there are madmen out there who will figure out how to get hold of them, they always have—what are we even making such things for?

We make weapons now that, if we ever used them, would kill ourselves. How do you explode a weapon with so much radiation in it that it will wipe out an entire city and think that it’s not going to blow over your own cities? We all breathe the same air. It’s madness.

What we are doing is deeply unfair and a profound tragedy—what we’re doing in the way of global warming, what we’re doing to the oceans—and none of it makes any sense to me.

Hemachandra: What will help our memes around these things shift?

Dyer: Consciousness will. New understandings will. Beliefs that these are things that we can no longer tolerate will, and then having elected leaders come out of that consciousness.

It’s slow. It’s inch by inch. But nature always bats last. The planet isn’t going anywhere. I recommend everyone read Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, which is so troubling. It’s a novel about what this planet would be like after such total destruction. But the planet will come back. It may take millions of years, billions of years, but a seed will come up in the middle. If we put concrete over every inch of this planet, some little seed will come through, and it will start over. As Alan Watts used to say, the planet will be peopled all over again. Everything will start all over again.

Einstein had that wonderful line that Marianne Williamson often cites: I don’t know with what weapons World War III will be fought, but World War IV will be fought with sticks and stones. So, the planet isn’t so much in danger. We are.

But we can shift in consciousness. David Hawkins speaks about the amazing power of even one person living in Christ consciousness. All it takes is one being living at a radical level of consciousness to transform all of the negativity on the planet, and just one person living at a high level can overcome the low consciousness of thousands. So, it’s not going to take a lot of us—just a handful.

Hemachandra: What are you most excited about today? What gives you hope?

Dyer: What I’m most excited about is that there’s an openness to this shift, and I do think that there’s a shift happening. We can sit here and talk about all the negativity, which we’ve done a little bit, but for every act of evil in the world, there are a million acts of kindness. Basically, our nature is to love each other and care about each other, and most of us do that. Most of us have no quarrel with anybody who’s living on another side of the planet and who might have a different religious persuasion. It’s just these small minorities to the far right and the far left who get all of the news time and print space.

But we’re starting to look at a new way of being, and I know ultimately that it will triumph. I think it’s coming soon, too.

Hemachandra: Specifically in the light of what we’ve been talking about, would you select a verse from the Tao Te Ching that you think is especially appropriate, or that carries special meaning for you?

Dyer:
Yes, Ray. The fortieth verse of the Tao is the shortest verse. Lao-tzu says, “Returning is the motion of the Tao. Yielding is the way of the Tao. The 10,000 things are born of being. Being is born of nonbeing.” We’re all returning.

Number seventy-six is a verse I love a lot, too. It starts, “A man is born gentle and weak; at his death he is hard and stiff. All things, including the grass and the trees, are soft and pliable in life; dry and brittle in death. Stiffness is thus a companion of death; flexibility a companion of life.”

I think that’s a beautiful verse. Stay flexible. Stay soft. More than thirty verses in the Tao refer to water in one way or another. Water is such a powerful teacher. We’re all water. We’re all comprised of it, born in it, conceived in it. We live in it.

Study water. Try to grab a hold of water, and it will always elude you. You just have to let yourself be in it. It’s soft, and it overcomes anything that’s hard. Put the hardest substance—say, titanium—out there, and let water flow over it. Eventually, patiently, peacefully, the water will just wear it away. Also, water will enter anywhere—through any opening at all.

So, let yourself be like that. God is in nature, everywhere and always. And we have so much to learn.

In the past decade, Ray Hemachandra has interviewed many of the world’s great spiritual teachers, including Louise Hay, Marianne Williamson, Eckhart Tolle, Byron Katie, and Sakyong Mipham. Loree Hemachandra is the author (as Loree Boyd) of Spirit Moves: The Story of Six Generations of Native American Women and a documentary filmmaker whose work includes the award-winning The Eagle and the Raven: A Purification by Banishment, which she wrote and coproduced. Read more about Ray and Loree Hemachandra’s work or contact them at http://www.hemachandra.com.

Reprinted with permission


Published on Sep 1, 2015

In the Video of the Month for this month, Easwaran draws on his own spiritual development to illustrate Spiritual growth. In this clip he talks of leaving behind his beloved world of literature, and discovering the spiritual world of the mystics who “throw light on life.”

Cakemix Spirituality is a unique gathering of words written from the perspective of an unhindered, egoless mind. As a result, a natural filtering of unnecessary analytical spiritual data is prevalent, thus delivering to the reader a clear concise perspective regarding a wide range of spiritual/human issues.

Cakemix Spirituality introduces a new, simple universal concept in the first chapter, which is then continuously referred to throughout the book as a foundation for explaining a broad range of spiritual topics. This original concept merges with current accepted views, while also occasionally challenging current accepted societal views. The simplicity of Jim Cartwright’s Energy Combination concept can be for some, ironically, difficult to understand, as it quite often renders the analytical egoic mind (the negative mind within the mind) obsolete, threatening its actual existence.

Cakemix Spirituality initially explains how each individual’s spiritual personality unconsciously regulates his or her own unique personal spiritual Energy Combination, then builds on this explanation, thus helping the reader to transition from unconscious regulation to conscious regulation of his or her own unique spiritual Energy Combination, (this being a dissipation or reduction of the reader’s negative egoic mind). The individual Energy Combination concept is then used as a basis for explaining issues at a planetary level for the human species as a collective.

The author’s writing style offers simplistic clarity, hence helping the reader to understand the primary nature and purpose of his or her being.

Jim Cartwright is a contemporary Australian spiritual writer, not aligned with any particular religious organization. His natural ability to simplify the most complex of issues relating to spirituality adds a fresh unique perspective to currently accepted conventional spiritual concepts, while simultaneously introducing to the reader his own new all encompassing universal energy concept.

VIEW HERE

Published on Aug 31, 2015

Also see https://batgap.com/loch-kelly/

Loch Kelly, M.Div., LCSW is the author of, Shift into Freedom: The Science and Practice of Open-Hearted Awareness. He is an educator, licensed psychotherapist and recognized leader in the field of nondual meditation who was asked to teach Sutra Mahamudra by Mingyur Rinpoche and nondual meditation by Adyashanti. Loch has worked in community mental health, established homeless shelters and counseled family members of 9/11. He is the founder of the non-profit Open-Hearted Awareness Institute. Loch collaborates with neuroscientists at Yale, UPenn and NYU to study how awareness training can enhance compassion and well-being. For more information, visit lochkelly.org.

View his book ” Shift into Freedom “ HERE


Consciousness is the most intimate experience of life, the essence of life itself. Among the many spiritual traditions born and developed in India, one ancient philosophy – Kashmmir Shaivism – has expored it completely.

Until now, Kashmir Shaivism was an esoteric field accessible only to a few scholars and other specialists. Here for the first time, Swami Shankarananda, a self realised spiritual master, presents the wisdom of this powerful tradition in a form that is accessible, entertaining and inspiring.


Originally a literature professor from New York, it was a life-changing episode when a gun was held to his head that made Swamiji begin to question what life was really about. In 1970 he began a spiritual quest that led him to India, where he studied widely until finding his teacher, Baba Muktananda.

Today Swami Shankarananda is a leading meditation teacher and director of the Shiva School of Meditation in Melbourne, Australia. He is the author of the ground breaking Consciousness Is Everything – a practical explanation of Kashmir Shaivism as well as other books incliding “Happy For No Good Reason” – an Australian best seller. His Self-inquiry meditation practices makes it easy for everyone to have an immediate and direct spiritual experience.

For more information please visit
http://www.shivayoga.org

BROWSE HERE

Is everything Consciousness?

Swami Shankarananda’s best selling guide to Kashmir Shaivism is titled
Consciousness Is Everything http://www.shivayoga.org/html/books.html
Here Swamiji explains what is meant by that.

Swami Shankarananda, Shiva School of Meditation and Yoga, Melbourne

Mahamandaleshwar Swami Shankarananda, known as Swamiji, is the spiritual master of http://www.shivayoga.org

Despite the recent ferocious public debate about belief, the concept most central to the discussion—God—frequently remains vaguely and obscurely described. Are those engaged in these arguments even talking about the same thing? In a wide-ranging response to this confusion, esteemed scholar David Bentley Hart pursues a clarification of how the word “God” functions in the world’s great theistic faiths.

Ranging broadly across Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Vedantic and Bhaktic Hinduism, Sikhism, and Buddhism, Hart explores how these great intellectual traditions treat humanity’s knowledge of the divine mysteries. Constructing his argument around three principal metaphysical “moments”—being, consciousness, and bliss—the author demonstrates an essential continuity between our fundamental experience of reality and the ultimate reality to which that experience inevitably points.

Thoroughly dismissing such blatant misconceptions as the deists’ concept of God, as well as the fundamentalist view of the Bible as an objective historical record, Hart provides a welcome antidote to simplistic manifestos. In doing so, he plumbs the depths of humanity’s experience of the world as powerful evidence for the reality of God and captures the beauty and poetry of traditional reflection upon the divine.

David Bentley Hart is an Eastern Orthodox theologian, philosopher, writer, and cultural commentator, described by George Weigel as “one of America’s sharpest minds.” He has taught at the University of Virginia, the University of St. Thomas (Minnesota), Duke Divinity School, Loyola College in Maryland, and Providence College.

David Bentley Hart: Being, Consciousness, Bliss: Beauty as Knowledge of God – Art Symposium 2013

Violence & Peace in Contemporary Art: Biola Art Symposium 2013. March 2, 2013.

David Bentley Hart, is an Orthodox theologian, philosopher, and cultural commentator, whose specialties include philosophical theology, patristics, and aesthetics. 
Hart has been published in various periodicals including, Pro Ecclesia, The Scottish Journal of Theology, First Things, and The New Criterion.

He has taught at the University of Virginia, the University of St. Thomas, Duke Divinity School, and Loyola College in Baltimore. Hart is the author of seven books including Beauty of the Infinite: The Aesthetics of Christian Truth (Eerdmans, 2004), which has been lauded by The Christian Century as “one of the most brilliant works by an American theologian in the past ten years.” His two most recent books are The Doors of the Sea: Where Was God in the Tsunami? (Eerdmans, 2011), and The Devil and Pierre Gernet: Stories, his first work of fiction (Eerdmans, 2012).

BROWSE HERE

David Bentley Hart – The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness, Bliss

David Bentley Hart, author of “The Experience of God: Being, Consciousness, Bliss,” spoke on his book on Tuesday, March 25 at the Bonhoeffer House at the University of Virginia.

Dr. Hart’s lecture was sponsored by the Project on Lived Theology at the University of Virginia (http://livedtheology.org).

David Bentley Hart is an Eastern Orthodox scholar of religion, philosopher, writer, and cultural commentator.

From the publisher:
Despite the recent ferocious public debate about belief, the concept most central to the discussion—God—frequently remains vaguely and obscurely described. Are those engaged in these arguments even talking about the same thing? In a wide-ranging response to this confusion, esteemed scholar David Bentley Hart pursues a clarification of how the word “God” functions in the world’s great theistic faiths.

Ranging broadly across Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Vedantic and Bhaktic Hinduism, Sikhism, and Buddhism, Hart explores how these great intellectual traditions treat humanity’s knowledge of the divine mysteries. Constructing his argument around three principal metaphysical “moments”—being, consciousness, and bliss—the author demonstrates an essential continuity between our fundamental experience of reality and the ultimate reality to which that experience inevitably points.

Thoroughly dismissing such blatant misconceptions as the deists’ concept of God, as well as the fundamentalist view of the Bible as an objective historical record, Hart provides a welcome antidote to simplistic manifestoes. In doing so, he plumbs the depths of humanity’s experience of the world as powerful evidence for the reality of God and captures the beauty and poetry of traditional reflection upon the divine.

For readers of Proof of Heaven, the astonishing story of a woman with an extraordinary psychic gift—and a powerful message from the Other Side that can help us to live more beautifully in the here and now.

Laura Lynne Jackson is a wife, a mother, a high school English teacher—and a psychic medium. Where most believe an impenetrable wall divides the world between the living and the dead, Jackson sees bright, brilliant cords of light that pass through a barrier as thin as a sheet of paper. Her gifts tested and verified by some of the most prominent scientific organizations studying paranormal phenomena, Jackson has dedicated her life to exploring our connection to the Other Side, conversing with departed loved ones, and helping people come to terms with loss. In The Light Between Us, she shares her remarkable journey and the lessons in love she’s learned along the way.

Jackson is just a child when she first realizes she is different from her peers. She has tremendous empathy and often finds herself overcome by the emotions of those around her. She has premonitions about friends and family members that leave her feeling helpless, sad, and confused. She confides in her mother—and learns that the gift runs in the family.

For twenty years Jackson leads a double life. By day, she teaches literature to Long Island high school students. At night, in private, she conducts readings that connect people with loved ones who have passed and imparts information with shocking accuracy and insight. And then one day, her two worlds become one and she comes to fully embrace her gift and her purpose.

Jackson writes with clarity and grace, using her unique perspective to address the eternal questions that vex us all: Why are we here? What happens when we die? How do we find our true path in this life? Here too are deeply affecting accounts of ordinary people reunited with their departed friends and family members—true stories of forgiveness and reconciliation that transcend the barrier between life and death.

The Light Between Us provides guideposts for living a rich and fulfilling life. In her beautiful worldview, Laura Lynne Jackson reminds us that our relationship to those we love endures across space and time; that we are all connected and invested in one another’s lives; and that we are here to give and receive love selflessly. Her story offers a new understanding of the vast reach of our consciousness and enlarges our view of the human experience.

Laura Lynne Jackson is a high school English teacher and psychic medium who has been certified by the Windbridge Institute for Applied Research in Human Potential and the Forever Family Foundation. She lives on Long Island with her husband and their three children. This is her first book

Angel Reader Laura Lyn investigates President Jimmy Carter’s (first) Haunted House

Join Laura Lyn as she investigates the former home of President Jimmy Carter in Plains, Georgia. Once used to hide escaped slaves as part of the underground railroad, the house was also home to a mentally disabled woman who was forced to live in a small hole in the attic floor.
Discover the history of this haunted landmark!

Visit Laura’s website at http://www.angelreader.net
Check out her book, The ABC’s of Psychic Development, at http://www.amazon.com/The-ABCs-Psychi…

Category
Education


“Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains. One man thinks himself the master of others, but remains more of a slave than they are.” -Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Although Rousseau was mainly referring to human society as a whole, even 250 years ago he understood that humanity can upgrade itself and live in a golden age by returning to nature and living a balanced life at peace with ourselves and each other. It’s almost hard to believe that, as a result of the ego (something that isn’t even fundamentally real), we can come to a point in our timeline where there is a probable possibility of species self-annihilation, whether by accident or by focused intention by the the most megalomaniacal of minds within our human collective. It’s is a very dangerous way to live and leaves the uncertainty of a bright future, if a future at all, at unsettling heights.

It’s time to finally come to terms with how big of a role the human ego plays in all the social and political issues we see all around us and that affect our daily lives. Putting band-aids on the symptoms will not cure the very deep causes of those symptoms.

Thanks to some wonderful luminaries of humanity, we can upgrade our understanding of what ego is from the rather simplistic Freudian view to a model that allows for more complexity. After all, the universe/multiverse as we understand it, is infinite in nature. Within this infinite reality time is irrelevant…the creation of a highly complex non-entity structure-process that has an illusion-generating nature is not an impossibility. The growth, metamorphosis, and transformation of the energy of Infinity can concoct aspects of Reality (algae, poetry, entheogens, lacrosse, etc.), one of them being of such a high level of sophistication that it has influenced the sentient life cycles of entire species like the human race.

Yes, rather than being an actual entity, the ego is a structure-process that has an illusion-generating nature…something that has been backed by not only thousands of years of personal and direct experiences & eastern philosophies, but also by the study of the nature of Reality and its various aspects through quantum physics and other forward-thinking sciences. Having the understanding of what the ego is in this expanded view can help us understand that whenever the ego exists, we exist in a state of confused perception thanks to the generated illusions it creates. This is why activities such as meditation are helpful in the minimization of the ego’s influence over our lives.

Understanding the Illusion

The powerful emotions of anger, fear, envy, and others can be seen as if they were mechanically following tiny signals…as if there was a switch that was pressed. The illusion is that we are seeing something that is an actual experience within an objective reality. However, the fact is that it is mostly a replay of past experience that is modified a little to fit present circumstances. This replay is recorded again in order to add to the previous memory, which ingrains things even deeper, leading us to have a greater conviction in its real-ness.

The more we experience in this way, the deeper we get stuck in the illusion. This entire time, we stay in a state of confusion where we think that we are basing our actions on experience itself. The delusional ego has made us prisoners of something that isn’t even real.

Take a look at how prevalent this is in older individuals. The older a person gets, the more ‘experienced’ he or she is in this illusion that has essentially entrained the brain to think a certain way. The older a person is, the more sure he or she is that they “know” what they’re doing, making it very difficult for them to think differently or delineate from the path the illusion has trained them to go down. The essence of such a person’s life is now made up of a series of illusions.

Wouldn’t you like to be free?

Wouldn’t you like to be in control of your own life and not have it controlled by something that isn’t even intrinsically real in the first place? You can and you will…if you can over come the great obstacle of fear. This incredibly powerful tool of the ego is a reflex that is set in movement when something that’s identified as very necessary is seen as being threatened. This reflex of fear causes a person to find every possible way of protecting what is felt as being necessary, or it failing this, to create illusions of escape from the approaching danger. In the strong words of physicist David Bohm, “fear confuses, corrodes, and corrupts the mind.”

Source: Author Archives: Shift

This journal chronicles the intuitive guidance received by one woman seeking to comprehend a world consumed by struggle, disappointment and confusion.Simply Being: One Year With Spirit is a helpful, tangible and inspirational book. It chronicles the intuitive guidance received by one woman seeking to comprehend a world consumed by struggle, disappointment and confusion.

Essentially, the whole of humanity asks the same questions about life and living. What is truth? How do i handle stress? Can i forgive? How do i heal my fears? Now “Simply Being” leads us through the answers in a way that is accessible, timely and absent of religious doctrine and dogma. Spirit’s voice is persistant here, teaching all that indeed everyone can easily access and remember the inner wisdom of God’s love.

Simply Being has been assembled as a progressive workbook. It contains 52 weeks of inspired material followed by prompts for insight. These prompts encourage the reader to journal, ask questions and receive their own answers. Additionally, each weekly reading, includes practical exercises for hands on use of the material and affirmations to keep insights fresh daily.Writing this journal each day, the author found herself happier, more peaceful and willing to offer herself and others love, understanding and peace. In the practice of this book’s material, she offers the same joy, hope and practical knowledge to whomever crosses its path.



Pamela Silberman
has been a licensed professional Recreation Therapist and group counselor, specializing in psychiatric treatment, since 1994. During the years of her college, graduate education and professional tenure, it has been her goal to translate the application of spiritual principles for everyday life experiences. Mainly she teaches this by example, choosing to emphasize that joy is available through all moments.

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Published on Aug 28, 2015

Ram Dass explains that love centered Truth is one of the vehicles for coming through to the living spirit in human relationships.

  • It’s best-kept secret in history: ordinary people, people just like you, can suddenly without any warning or preparation can find themselves transported to otherworldly realms when making love, as though God’s lightning-bolt shot through the bedroom, transforming everything. Sex can trigger amazing altered-state experiences—without drugs, meditation, or Tantric or other special practices. And when it does, nothing is ever the same again.

Transcendent Sex: When Lovemaking Opens the Veil is based on the narratives of 91 people who went to bed with their lovers and suddenly had an awe-inspiring experience that forever changed the way they understood themselves and reality—and the power of sex and the body as a path to realization.

This book explains how lovemaking sweeps people into glorious new dimensions, rips the veil between the worlds, and produces ecstasies a thousand times more powerful than the most exquisite orgasm. Lovemaking so spectacular really does become a religious experience, even for atheists and agnostics.

Transcendent sex was probably the basis for the sacred sex of ancient times, such as the mystery religions of Egypt, Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome, China, and India. But sacred sex is alive and well today, even though nobody talks about it. The states triggered by lovemaking are identical to the highest states identified in shamanism, yoga, Buddhism, and mystical Christianity, Judaism and Islam, including:

  • Shapeshifting
  • Being possessed by or channeling animals, plants, and supernatural beings
  • Seeing divine avatars
  • Reliving past lives
  • Having paranormal powers
  • Awakening to the enlightenment of nirvana
  • Being one with God

What Dr. Wade’s Research Can Do for You

Research suggests that this kind of sex will happen at least once to 1 out of every 8 people. It’s a life-changing experience that can be hazardous if you’re not grounded, but for people who know how to integrate them, like other spiritual events, transcendent sex can result in:

  • Shedding a lifetime of shame and guilt about sexuality
  • Healing from sexual trauma and abuse to enjoy making love
  • Acquiring paranormal abilities for healing or psychic gifts
  • Having a healthier, happier, more fulfilling life
  • Opening to spiritual realization, even after a lifetime of seeking, or one of atheism, doubt, or a religion that didn’t fit

Dr. Jenny Wade’s groundbreaking research can help you understand:

  • What transcendent sex is
  • The dark side of transcendent sex
  • How to cultivate transcendent sex for yourself
  • How to avoid the very real hazards associated with it
  • What positive transformation you can expect from transcendent sexual experiences

  • Dr. Jenny Wade is a speaker, researcher, and consultant who specializes in the spontaneous openings and intentional practices that expand human potential by accessing hidden or unused innate capacities. She is a developmental psychologist who studies the gateways to greater possibility available to everyone. Dr. Wade is a keynote speaker and workshop leader featured in such wide-ranging venues as Oprah Radio with Dr. Oz, the OMXperience conference, Penthouse Germany, sacred sexuality conferences, Esalen, and ID Academy in Denmark.

    In addition to unusual states of awareness, Dr. Wade’s research of variations in normal adult consciousness forms the basis of a leadership development consulting practice. She has over twenty years’ experience working with global organizations to optimize performance.

    Dr. Wade is a frequent media presenter and the author of Changes of Mind: A Holonomic Theory of the Evolution of Consciousness, Transcendent Sex: When Lovemaking Opens the Veil and numerous articles.

    BROWSE HERE

    Transcendent Sex with Jenny Wade, Ph.D

    Interview with university professor & author Jenny Wade about her book: “Transcendent Sex” about ordinary people having unexpected extraordinary sexual experiences that change their lives. Jenny Wade teaches at the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology. Transcendentsex.org
    MaxVanPraagTV – Love & Sex Talk (formerly Private Matters)
    Produced & hosted by Max J. Van Praag
    Bliss Productions, San Rafael, CA
    info@PrivateMatters.tv
    privatematters.tv

    Is sex equivalent to a spiritual practice? – Jenny Wade


Published on Aug 28, 2015

A discussion about attention leaving its source to attend to objects.

Published on Aug 27, 2015
Devotional Practices – Part 2 (07/01/2015)

The sacred feminine expresses the realization of our belonging, our innate interdependence with all of life. These two classes explores inner practices that help us open to our longing to belong, and awaken the power of prayer.
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Inspiring accounts from renowned contemporary working shamans about their first moments of spiritual epiphany

• With contributions by Sandra Ingerman, Hank Wesselman, John Perkins, Alberto Villoldo, Lewis Mehl-Madrona, Tom Cowan, Lynn Andrews, Linda Star Wolf, and others

• Also includes shamanic awakening experiences from those with unique shamanic paths–teachers, mothers, social workers, academics, and even rappers

How does one receive the “call” to enter onto the shamanic path? What causes some people to change their safe, uneventful, and ordinary lives and start on a spiritual search? For many it is a singular instant, a flash when the mystical reveals itself and the person is drawn into the world of shamanic power. For a few, it is a more gradual awakening, filled with numinous events that build upon one another until the calling of the shamanic path can no longer be ignored.

In this book of remarkable stories, we learn firsthand about the many different forms of the “aha” moment of shamanic awakening, whether they arise from ceremony, near-death experiences, dream messages, or entheogenic substances. We travel alongside Sandra Ingerman, Hank Wesselman, John Perkins, Alberto Villoldo, Lewis Mehl-Madrona, Tom Cowan, Lynn Andrews, Linda Star Wolf, and other well-known shamanic practitioners as they begin their transformations into the prominent shamans we know them as. We experience the real-life shamanic epiphanies of those with unique shamanic paths–teachers, mothers, social workers, academics, healers, and even rappers who have all experienced a moment in time in which they were awakened and the shamanic path showed itself to them.

As each of these unique and beautiful stories of unexpected realization, insight, and inspiration unfolds, we see how these single moments–usually entirely unexpected–are able to transform the individual’s life, clearing their vision and allowing a new consciousness to emerge. As a whole, this collection paints a breathtaking portrait of the intricacies of the shamanic path and the paradigm shift of which we all are part

Itzhak Beery
is an internationally recognized shamanic healer and teacher. He was initiated into the Circle of 24 Yachaks by his Quechua teacher in Ecuador and by Amazonian Kanamari Pagè. He has also trained intensively with other elders from South and North America. The founder of ShamanPortal.org and cofounder of the New York Shamanic Circle, he is on the faculty of New York Open Center. His work has been featured in the New York Times, films, TV, and webinars. An accomplished visual artist and owner of an award-winning advertising agency, he grew up on Kibbutz Beit Alfa in Israel and lives in New York.

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The Gift of Shamanism – With Itzhak Beery

Published on May 17, 2015

Itzhak Beery, the author of The Gift of Shamanism,bridges the indigenous shamanic traditions his teachers entrusted in him with a contemporary shamanic approach relevant to our modern life.

Born in Israel he is a New York-based practitioner who conducts shamanic healing ceremonies, and teaches seminars internationally and co-lead trips to Ecuador and Brazil’s Amazon.

Itzhak apprenticed intensively and initiated by don Jose Joaquin Diaz Pineda an Ecuadorian Quechua Yachak from Iluman, into his family tradition and into the Sacred 24 Yachaks Circle of Imbabura. He was also was initiated by Shoré a North Amazonian Pagé in Brazil. He studied with and assisted Ipupiara Makunaiman a Brazilian Amazonian Pagé from the Uru-eu-wau-wau tribe for 12 years until his passing and with his wife Cliecha, Peruvian Curandera and also with other indigenous and contemporary elders and shamans from around the world.

Itzhak’s work has been featured in a variety of worldwide publications including the NY Times, radio and video interviews and he is often invited to speak on panel discussions, press conferences and festivals and to host and participate in Shamanic Webinars.

He was featured in the feature film “The Hindenburg Omen” and Parashakti’s “Dance of Liberation” documentary. He is also the featured shaman in the upcoming TV show “Soul Search.”

His website is: http://www.itzhakbeery.com/index.php

The Marriage of Spirit is a handbook for spiritual awakening for people living and working in the world. It directly addresses how we can experience divine presence in our lives, and offers simple, powerful and fast exercises for creating balance and harmony.

Based in the ancient teachings of the reconciliation of opposites, these revolutionary, unique, and easy journaling techniques help us accelerate the path to unity consciousness by quickly and dramatically moving us beyond egoic limitations and overcoming negativity, anger, pain and fear. Included is the especially powerful “Squares” technique, which creates radical and rapid transformation.

In this groundbreaking book, which has been translated into several languages and has helped thousands worldwide, Leslie Temple-Thurston shares the story of the awakenings that led to her spiritual transformation, and her eclectic, yogic-influenced approach to Western enlightenment. Filtered through spiritual psychology, her insights and principles are based on the truth teachings of ancient mystery schools, traditions and religions, revamped and simplified for the contemporary spiritual seeker.

As the author says, “We have arrived at a new and different time; we are here to enlighten the physical plane, the body, and the personality while living and working in the world…. If we integrate the dualistic and polarized schisms in our personality, we can know directly and palpably the unity which we truly are, beyond the limited personality.”

In a world torn apart by polarization, it offers hope for a third way, the way of unity amidst diversity.


Leslie Temple-Thurston is a teacher of enlightenment, who for twenty-two years has wholeheartedly dedicated her life to inspiring and guiding people towards reaching their spiritual awakening at this most important and pivotal moment in humanity’s evolution.

“The heart is where heaven and earth meet—
it is the place where our human-ness meets and integrates with our divinity. The journey to discover the heart is the journey to find our true humanity—the perfected human being—that which we really are.”

—Leslie Temple-Thurston

Leslie mentors individual seekers worldwide who are committed to their work of transformation and awakening to higher states. She guides people towards becoming fully conscious of and knowledgeable about the luminous core of light within themselves. She encourages her committed students, and many others who come to sit with and study with her, to aspire fully and completely towards the state of mystical enlightenment.

Vision holder and founder of the non-profit organization CoreLight, Leslie and her partner of 18 years Brad Laughlin, developed CoreLight’s school of transformation, which offers online seminars and group meditations, as well as ongoing study courses.

To assist people in their awakening, Leslie also spent many years developing a unique and powerful set of processing techniques that have the capacity to release the patterned behavioral states of the ego that block an individual’s ability to fulfill their spiritual potential. This simple yet potent clearing work is a vital part of the transformation that Leslie offers her students on their journey to achieve higher states of consciousness. She believes that someone can only fully wake up by looking at and releasing their ego patterning.

Leslie was born and raised in South Africa. She graduated from the University of Witswatersrand in Johannesburg with a B.A. in Fine Arts and worked professionally as a painter and art teacher while in her twenties. Art had always been an inspired way for her to express and develop the natural mystical inclination she had had since childhood. In her late twenties and thirties she found the inner pull of the mystic life to be her path, and surrendered her beloved art to give herself completely to the fulltime study of mysticism and transformation. She came to the United States in 1977, where she deepened her studies of ancient wisdom through meditation, yogic teachings and spiritual psychology.

Leslie’s dedication to spirit resulted in a two-year “cave experience”, which culminated in April of 1988 when she experienced the dissolution of her old ego identity and a profound awakening. With this came the gift of being able to share with others a transmission of grace, unconditional love and healing energy, known in the East as Shakti, which has uplifting, enduring, and transformational effects on those who receive it. She shares her transmission and her wisdom with those who attend her events or undertake committed study programs with her.

Leslie is the author of two books: The Marriage of Spirit – Enlightened Living in Today’s World and Returning to Oneness – The Seven Keys of Ascension, which have been translated into several languages. Her extensive teachings are also available through her training courses and on numerous CDs or as mp3 downloads, which are available in English and Portuguese (Brazilian). Her training courses include: Spiritual Warrior Training, a self-paced correspondence course, and Enhanced Self-Discovery Program, a series of advanced teachings offered as eight individual modules. The Enhanced Self-Discovery Program is now available to anyone who has completed both semesters of the Spiritual Warrior Training.

Leslie is the founder of the humanitarian aid organization, Seeds of Light, whose mission is to assist with the awakening of the Global Heart, which she perceives to be the interconnectedness of all life through tolerance, forgiveness, love and compassion. Seeds of Light offers services to South Africa’s AIDS orphans and marginalized communities, and helps preserve endangered species and eco systems worldwide.

Leslie lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and in Limpopo Province, South Africa.

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Leslie Temple Thurston – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview


Published on Aug 25, 2015

Eckhart Tolle, author of THE POWER OF NOW, offers insight into dealing with unconsciousness. Eckhart Tolle answers the question, “How can we address our ecological situation?

Russel Williams is one of the most remarkable enlightened spiritual teachers of our time. After an early life of extreme hardship—leaving school at the age of 11, and becoming an orphan shortly afterwards—he underwent a spiritual awakening at the age of 29.

Since the late 1950s, he has been a spiritual teacher, and is still actively teaching now, at the age of 94. Previously, Russel has avoided publicity and never published any writings or transcripts of his talks, preferring to work quietly with small groups. This is the first time any details of his teachings or of his life have appeared in print.

This book is partly a record of his teachings, and partly also the story of his extraordinary life. Working with well-known spiritual author Steve Taylor—who has attended Russel’s meetings regularly since the 1990s—Russel has created a profound text which will surely become known as a classic of spiritual literature.

Russel Williams
was born in London in 1921. He now lives in lives in Atherton, near Manchester, UK, with his wife Joyce. Since 1974, he has been the president of The Buddhist Society of Manchester. This is his first book. Steve Taylor PhD is a senior lecturer in psychology at Leeds Metropolitan University. He is the author of several best-selling books including Waking From Sleep and Back to Sanity, and a book of spiritual poems The Meaning. http://www.stevenmtaylor.co.uk

BROWSE HERE

A new study identifies a vital trait to living for (at least) a century.

By Carolyn Gregoire

What’s the secret of people who live vibrant, healthy lives well beyond the age of 100?

Low levels of inflammation — the long-term overactivation of the immune response — may be the answer, suggests a new study of centenarians from researchers in England and Japan. People with lower markers of chronic inflammation also tend to be less likely to develop diseases, meaning suppressing inflammation could be the No. 1 key to not only living longer but to staying healthy longer.

“Centenarians and supercentenarians are different — put simply, they age slower,” Dr. Thomas von Zglinicki, a cellular gerontologist at Newcastle University and the study’s lead author, said in a written statement. “They can ward off diseases for much longer than the general population.”

Dr. Cheri Gostic, a geriatric specialist at Stony Brook University who has studied the effects of physical activity on inflammation, said the findings, which were published online last week in the journal EBioMedicine, weren’t entirely surprising.

“Research has demonstrated that chronic systemic inflammation is a key factor in the development of many common chronic diseases, including … heart attacks, peripheral vascular disease and most strokes,” Gostic told The Huffington Post. “Old age does not cause death; disease does. If one can minimize inflammation in the body and reduce the risk or progression of disease, then it makes sense that individuals have a better chance to live longer.”

In addition to low levels of inflammation, healthy centenarians and supercentenarians (people over 110 years old) also had longer telomeres, which are the caps on the end of DNA strands that protect the chromosomes from aging and poor health.

Telomere length has generally been thought to be the strongest predictor of how healthy someone will be in their old age. However, the researchers found that once a person reaches 100, inflammation levels rather than telomere length better predict successful aging and cognitive ability.

The Inflammation Factor

For the study, the researchers analyzed data from 1,500 adults between the ages of 50 and 115 years old, including 684centenarians or supercentenarians and 167 children of centenarians. They measured for various health markers thought to contribute to aging, including metabolism, blood cell count, telomere length, inflammation, and liver and kidney function.

Here are some of the key findings:

Even when they were well into their 80s and beyond, the children of centenarians (who are likely to become centenarians themselves) maintained telomeres more typical of a 60-year-old.
Centenarians with the lowest levels of markers for chronic inflammation were able to maintain good cognition and independence for the longest periods of time. Those with less inflammation also experienced the greatest longevity.
Inflammation was a stronger predictor of cognitive capacity in semi-supercentenarians (those who lived to be 105) than gender or biological age.

Researchers also found that the children of centenarians tended to have lower markers of chronic inflammation, meaning your chances of living a long, healthy life are to some extent genetic.

“This indicates that someone who will (probably) become a centenarian is able to keep inflammation down for longer,” von Zglinicki told HuffPost.

Scientists have long known that inflammation plays some role in disease and aging, and a study on mice found that inflammation can even accelerate the aging process. The new findings provide further evidence that chronic inflammation may be the most important factor determining how quickly or slowly we age.

Making It To 100

Reaching a better scientific understanding of how centenarians achieve such extreme longevity — and how inflammation factors into the aging process — may help the rest of us to live longer and healthier.

Hoping to join the 100 club? Adopting an anti-inflammatory diet and lifestyle is a good place to start. Eating a diet of whole foods, exercising and cultivating positive emotions — not to mention avoiding excessive consumption of sugar and processed foods, stress and sleep deprivation — can keep chronic inflammation at bay.

“Control inflammatory status regularly and keep it down,” von Zglinicki advised. “This should slow down the aging process and thus might postpone onset of multiple age-related diseases, potentially including dementia.”

While current anti-inflammatory drugs are not safe for long-term use because of their side effects, the findings may open up avenues for research devising safer anti-inflammatory drugs to improve quality of life among older people.

Source: Huffington Post

Why is it so difficult to change our beliefs and behaviors even when we know they no longer serve us? How can certain individuals reverse incurable disease while others suffer the effects of childhood wounds despite years of therapy? These are the questions readers will explore in the much-anticipated new book from clinical neuropsychologist and biocognitive science founder Dr. Mario Martinez.

In The MindBody Code, Dr. Martinez challenges us to embrace a radically new paradigm for health and well-being. Readers will not only learn the basics of this fascinating cutting-edge science, but they will also learn to communicate with the body in its own biosymbolic language for results that until this point may have been elusive at best. Martinez reveals the way our cultural beliefs impact our immune system, the pathway to healing the archetypal wounds of shame, abandonment, and betrayal, and much more.

Dr. Martinez is a licensed clinical psychologist and bestselling author of “The MindBody Code: How to Change the Beliefs that Limit Your Health, Longevity, and Success” and the psychological novel “The Man from Autumn“.

He specializes in how cultural and transcendental beliefs affect health and longevity. He lectures worldwide on his theory of Biocognition and on investigations he has conducted of alleged cases of stigmata for the Catholic Church, the BBC, Discovery, and National Geographic. Also, based on how the immune system makes decisions under conditions of uncertainty, he developed a unique model of organizational science he calls “The Empowerment Code”, to teach executives of global companies how to maximize productivity while enhancing wellness.

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How Our Cultural Beliefs Affect Health & Longevity: Interview with Tami Simon

Tami Simon speaks with Mario Martinez, a clinical neuropsychologist whose breakthrough research examines how cultural beliefs affect our health and longevity. Mario is the founder of biocognitive science, a new paradigm that examines the dynamic relationship between thoughts, culture, and the body. In this episode, Tami speaks with Mario about the idea that culture creates biology; how we can access the antidote to shame, abandonment, and betrayal through healing fields in the body; and the concept of “the drift”—how we can navigate chaos with uncertainty as our guide.

Dr. Mario Martinez & Dr Deepak Chopra: The Mind Body Code

Published on Aug 25, 2015
How culture, context and interpretation shape our biology.

Product Details

Francis Lucille is a spiritual teacher in the tradition of Advaita Vedanta (non-duality). A long time disciple of Jean Klein whom he met in 1975, he was a friend of Robert Linssen, Wolter Keers, Yvan Amar, William Samuel and Robert Adams. He was also influenced by J. Krishnamurti, Krishna Menon and Wei Wu Wei whom he knew personally. Many contemporary advaita teachers have attended his teaching events. He transmits the ancient teaching of nonduality, the common ground of Advaita Vedanta, Ch’an Buddhism, Zen,Taoism and Sufism. Each chapter of this book contains a conversation with Francis Lucille which took place on a particular day. The first eight chapters are conversations during a residential retreat in a rural setting near Ottawa, Canada in October 2002. The last two chapters are conversations at two public meetings in London in May 2002.

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1. Satsang is an opera of sorts from which we appreciate truth, love and beauty when we are open multi-dimensionally.
2. How can ignorance have come from the divine?


Published on Jul 3, 2015

A conversation exploring the nature of happiness.


Published on Aug 24, 2015

In response to the audience question, “What is your deepest wish for the world?”

“If I could have a deepest wish for this world it would be that magic could return so that maybe the grandchildren of my grandchildren could say, ‘I have heard stories of a time when the magic was not present.'”

From the 2015 event “Spiritual Life: Miracles & Magic” at the Mercy Center in Burlingame, CA

Spiritual Life opens our eyes to the miraculous, to the wonder and power of divine presence. We can also begin to access the magic of creation, life’s natural transformative power. In this talk, Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee explores the difference between miracles and magic, and how to recognize their hidden qualities.

The Magic of Creation: The Loss of Earth Magic

My greatest sadness is the loss of earth magic that we have in our culture'”

From the 2015 event “Spiritual Life: Miracles & Magic” at the Mercy Center in Burlingame, CA

Spiritual Life opens our eyes to the miraculous, to the wonder and power of divine presence. We can also begin to access the magic of creation, life’s natural transformative power. In this talk, Llewellyn Vaughan-Lee explores the difference between miracles and magic, and how to recognize their hidden qualities.


Published on Jun 26, 2015

A discussion exploring the nature and purpose of the mind

No TV, no cell phone, no social media, no family or friends. Just alone in silence for sixty days. Written from a small cabin in the mountains above Santa Cruz, California, Bok’s diary recounts his retreat into solitude and his search for a return to the simplicity of pure being. Without distraction, he has no choice but to face whatever comes – whether it’s the incessant chatter of the mind, the arising of overwhelming emotions, or the simple observations of running water and birdsong.

We say it’s Bok’s diary, but he draws us in so intimately that these sixty days become our own. Through this intense and immersive process, both for Bok and the reader, a deeper place is found within, a place of stillness and well being. You may be surprised what Bok finds, or more importantly, what he doesn’t find. Alexandra Burda’s illustrations are a perfect compliment to the sparseness, sensitivity and beauty of the text.


After a series of extraordinary experiences in his 20’s, Bok set out to find a teacher. Feeling right at home in the Ramana Maharshi tradition, Bok first discovered Catherine Ingram, then Byron Katie, and finally Adyashanti, whom he now considers his main teacher. Bok works as an artist – writer, landscape architect, filmmaker – and also loves to share his gathered understanding with students deeply interested in knowing their own true nature. He maintains a robust teaching practice in Los Angeles, California. Bok has also been deeply influenced by Jean Klein, Douglas Harding, and Nisargadatta Maharaj.

LOOK INSIDE

Open your heart and mind to the wisdom of the animal world.

Animal Speak provides techniques for recognizing and interpreting the signs and omens of nature. Meet and work with animals as totems and spirit guides by learning the language of their behaviors within the physical world.

Animal Speak shows you how to: identify, meet, and attune to your spirit animals; discover the power and spiritual significance of more than 100 different animals, birds, insects, and reptiles; call upon the protective powers of your animal totem; and create and use five magical animal rites, including shapeshifting and sacred dance.

This beloved, bestselling guide has become a classic reference for anyone wishing to forge a spiritual connection with the majesty and mystery of the animal world.

Ted Andrews is a full-time author, student, and teacher in the metaphysical and spiritual fields. He conducts seminars, symposiums, workshops, and lectures throughout the country on many facets of ancient mysticism, focusing on translating esoteric material to make it comprehensible and practical for everyone. This includes resynthesizing ancient scriptures, literature, and teachings for use by the modern spiritual student.

Ted is certified in basic hypnosis and acupressure, and is involved in the study and use of herbs as an alternative path in health care. He is active in the holistic healing field, focusing strongly on esoteric forms of healing with sound, music, and voice. Trained in piano, Ted also employs the use of the Celtic harp, bamboo flute, shaman rattles, Tibetan bells, Tibetan Singing Bowl, and quartz crystal bowls to create individual healing therapies and induce higher states of consciousness. Ted is a clairvoyant and also works with past-life analysis, aura interpretation, dreams, numerology, and Tarot.
Andrews is the author of The Healer’s Manual; Animal-Speak, How to See & Read the Aura; Dream Alchemy; Crystal Balls & Crystal Bowls; How to Develop & Use Psychic Touch; How to Heal with Color; Sacred Sounds; Magickal Dance; and many other titles.

LOOK INSIDE

Animal Speak by Ted Andrews

So this video is a two-fer. First will be some updates on my life and then we move into a book review of Animal Speak: The Spiritual and Magical Powers of Creatures Great and Small by Ted Andrews.


Published on Aug 24, 2015

Since the Center for Sacred Sciences was founded in 1987, Joel Morwood has served as the spiritual director and primary teacher for its community of practitioners. Joel’s first book, Naked Through the Gate: A Spiritual Autobiography , tells the story of his own spiritual path, culminating in Gnosis, or Awakening, in 1983.

Here is some of what Joel has to say about himself and his role: Some people who have come to me have been disappointed to discover that I have no supernatural powers to transmit, no magic wand to wave, no extraordinary knowledge to dispense which can make them instantly wise, loving, and happy. “Who, then, are you?” they ask. “What’s your secret?” My secret can be summed up in one word: Selflessness.

Selflessness is the Truth. Selflessness is the Way. Selflessness is the Fruit. In reality, there is no ‘you’ nor ‘I’ nor any ‘self’ whatsoever. There is only Consciousness Itself—the One True God—which is what we are. All that is necessary is to Realize This, because to Realize This is Wisdom, to Live This is Love, to Be This is Happiness. So, if you really want to know my secret, look to your ‘self’. In finding the source of your ‘self’, you will find Consciousness Itself, and nothing else. Then, you, too, will be free of your self and all its sufferings.

Joel has no special religious attire. In fact, he often wears old blue jeans, sweatshirts, and a Mexican poncho. He is married, enjoys movies, drinks wine, and interacts with others much like any other guy. Joel speaks from his own Realization, or Gnosis. Although he makes use of stories, texts, and practices taken from many different traditions, his interpretations are always spontaneous, direct, and personal.

He continually points beyond mere intellectual understanding to a Truth that is beyond both thought and experience. Moreover, he constantly links the teachings of the mystics with concrete examples drawn from daily life so that one can see how they actually relate to one’s own experiences. In all this Joel displays an intuition, sensitivity and humor which could never have come from book-learning alone. Moreover, because Joel has no pretensions about being someone special, he is approachable not only as a teacher, but also as a friend. He is a wonderful listener who knows how to pierce right to the heart of a problem. Often he can point out ways of viewing a situation from an entirely new perspective, yet he always insists one take responsibility for making one’s own decisions. Moreover, when he has no advice to offer, he doesn’t hesitate to say, “I don’t know.”

Joel is a teacher who always challenges his students to investigate the mystics and their teachings for themselves. Far from demanding blind obedience, or even verbal agreement, he encourages them to explore various teachers, to compare what he says with the teachings found in the great mystical traditions, to test all these teachings against our one’s experience, and to test one’s own experience against the hard realities of life.

In his view, a true spiritual path never leads one away from reality but, on the contrary, forces one to face it squarely, no matter how ugly or painful it may appear. It is only by getting to the bottom of suffering that we can be free of suffering. Beyond that suffering, Joel assures us, there is the Boundless Joy of Consciousness Itself—and, indeed, with his guidance we sometimes catch a glimpse of this as well!

Finally, Joel receives no financial remuneration from the Center. His teachings are given as a labor of love freely to all—although occasionally he has asked for personal donations to cover special needs, like the time he needed a suit for his marriage.

Other books: The Way of Selflessness: A Practical Guide to Enlightenment Based on the Teachings of the World’s Great Mystics Through Death’s Gate: A Guide to Selfless Dying

Talk by Tom McFarlane referred to during the interview: Einstein, Buddha, Reality: The Nondual Roots of Science

Interview recorded 8/22/2015

View his book ” The Way of Selflessness: A Practical Guide to Enlightenment Based on the Teachings of the World’s Great Mystics HERE

Originally published in Natural Health magazine, 2012.

From time to time, we all have experiences when restlessness and discontent fade away, and we’re filled with a sense of ease, well-being and harmony. We become free of pressure to keep busy and the need for stimulation, and rest at ease within ourselves and within the present moment.

I call these experiences ‘harmony of being.’ They usually occur when we’re quiet and relaxed and there’s stillness around us – for example, when we’re walking through the countryside, working quietly with our hands, listening to or playing music, or after meditation, yoga or sex. The chattering of our minds fades away and we feel a natural flow of connection between ourselves and our surroundings or other people.

Sometimes these experiences seem to come out of nowhere, for no apparent reason. You might experience harmony of being for a brief moment when you wake up in the morning after a good night’s sleep – just for a few seconds, before your thoughts start chattering away about the day ahead, your mind is empty and still, and you’re filled with a sense of well-being and wholeness. Or another morning, when you wake up early, go downstairs and sit at the breakfast table. There’s quietness and stillness around you, and you feel quiet and still inside too, a glow of contentment spreading through you. You look through the window at your garden, just beginning to reveal itself in the dim light, and you’re suddenly you’re struck by how beautiful it is. You feel as if you’re seeing it in a different way to normal, seeing flowers and plants that you don’t normally notice, and the whole garden seems so still and yet at the same time so wild and alive.

Or you might experience harmony of being when you’re watching your children play in the garden in summer. You look around you, at the sunlight splashing through the trees and the perfect blue sky above you, and listen to your children’s laughter – and the scene seems so perfect that time seems to stand still. Or even when you’re driving down the motorway and are suddenly struck by the beauty of the evening sun, shining between the clouds and across the fields – just for a few moments, you feel lit up inside too, and a warm glow of well-being flows through your whole being.

Harmony-Generating Experiences

Spontaneous experiences of harmony like these are quite rare though. Usually harmony of being is linked to certain activities or situations. For example, there are some sports which often give rise to the state. Several joggers and long-distance runners have told me that running has a powerful psychological effect on them, making them feel very calm and alert, and more ‘grounded’. One colleague told me that he goes running every day because ‘It helps clear my mind, helps me get back to myself. It puts me back in tune with the world again, after all the hassles of work. All the work stuff fades from my mind and I just take pleasure from where I am, from the elements around me.’

Swimming can also give rise to harmony. Once, when I was talking to a group of students about meditation, a young woman said to me, ‘That’s what I do when I go swimming!’ She went on to say that

When I’m swimming, I get into the rhythm of my movements and the gliding feeling of going through the water – I get so into it that I forget everything. I just feel the water against my skin and look up at the light shining on the water and the waves moving across the pool and it all looks perfect. When I get out of the water and get changed I feel happy and peaceful.

More dangerous and demanding pursuits can generate harmony too, such as climbing, flying or diving. Activities like these require so much concentration that they help us to forget the niggling concerns of daily life. The demands of the present – to make the next manoeuvre or avoid a potential danger – focus the mind so much that thought-chatter fades away and the future and the past cease to exist. As a result, climbers or pilots sometimes experience a sense of wholeness and contentment, becoming intensely aware of the beauty of their surroundings, and even feeling a sense of oneness with them.

Sex often gives rise to harmony too, for similar reasons. The sensations we experience during sex are usually so pleasurable and powerful that they have a mind-quietening effect; thoughts about the past and future fade away, as we become completely present. Afterwards, you’re filled with a soothing glow of well-being, lying there with your partner in your arms, listening to the sounds of the night and staring into the warm, rich darkness. And then, you might pull back your curtain and look at the scene outside your window and feel that everything is somehow different. The clouds gliding across the sky seem somehow more real, as if an extra dimension has been added to them, and the black spaces between them seem somehow richer and thicker than before. And on the streets everything seems to be in its right place, the cars parked in front of your house and the trees and the streetlights along the side. The light of the lamps seems radiant and somehow benevolent.

Contact with nature is a major source of harmony too, and one of the main reasons why so many of us love the countryside. The beauty and grandeur of nature draws our attention away from thought-chatter, and the stillness and space relax us even further. As a result, our minds become quiet, and our ego-boundaries become softer, so that we transcend separateness and feel connected to our surroundings.

The Sources of Harmony

So what is it about meditation, sex, climbing or running which generates harmony of being?

The most important factor is that all of these activities provide a focus for the mind. There’s a steady stream of attention directed at a particular object, and this has the effect of quietening our thought-chatter. And when the mind is quiet in this way, we become free of both the disturbance and negativity of our normal thought-chatter. We feel a sense of inner stillness because there literally is stillness inside us. Our being becomes calm, like the still surface of a lake. And this also means that the super-critical person inside our heads – who’s always criticising our behaviour and reminding of the things we should feel bad about in the past and worry about in the future – disappears. There’s no one to make us feel guilty, to make us worry about the future, or bitter about the past.

In these moments, we become aware that, although the surface of our being is filled with disturbance and negativity, beneath that there is a deep reservoir of stillness and well-being. The surface of our being is like a rough sea which sweeps you to and fro and makes you feel disoriented and anxious. But if you wear diving equipment and go beneath the surface, you’re suddenly in the midst of endless silence and stillness.

The lack of discord inside us means that we’re free from the compulsion to do, and able to be. In fact, this ability to do nothing is one of the most pleasant aspects of harmony of being. We can sit down at the table or walk around the house and be content just to be here. There’s no impulse to turn on the television or the radio, to reach for a magazine or to check your e-mail or to phone a friend for a chat.

Permanent Harmony and Sanity?

These moments of harmony don’t have to be fleeting. In fact, this is basic aim of all spiritual traditions, and all spiritual practices: to generate a state of permanent inner harmony. This is what we call ‘enlightenment’ – a state in which the discord of the human mind is truly healed. In my new book Back to Sanity, I propose an eight-stage path of self-development leading to a permanent state of harmony, including practices such as ‘transcending negative thought patterns,’ ‘Healing the mind through quietness and stillness’ as well as traditional practices such as service and meditation.

In harmony of being, life becomes a glorious adventure, full of joy and wonder. And one of the most striking things about this state is how natural it feels. That’s because it’s our most natural state, a state in which we come home, to our innermost nature.

How to Generate Harmony of Being

  • Have contact with nature. The stillness and beauty of nature can quieten the chattering of our minds and bring a sense of inner peace.
  • Help other people. Altruistic acts connect us with us and help us to transcend separateness.
  • Mindfulness exercises. When you have a shower, brush your teeth, eat your meals or any other daily activity, give your full attention to the experience rather than to thoughts inside your head.
  • Make friends with quietness and inactivity. Timetable periods for ‘doing nothing’ during the week.
  • Quietness allows our minds to settle into a state of harmony.
  • Go running or swimming. Sports like these can heal the surface discord of our minds puts us in touch the harmony underneath.

Dr Steve Taylor is the author of several best-selling books on psychology and spirituality, and is a senior lecturer in psychology at Leeds Beckett University. For the last four years he has been included (this year at no. 62) in Mind, Body, Spirit magazine’s list of the ‘100 most spiritually influential living people.’ His books include Waking From Sleep, The Fall, Out of the Darkness, Back to Sanity, and his latest book The Calm Center. His books have been published in 19 languages, including Dutch, Korean, Russian, Spanish, Italian, French, Japanese, Polish and Spanish. Eckhart Tolle has described his work as ‘an important contribution to the shift in consciousness which is happening on our planet at present.’ Andrew Harvey has said of his work, ‘Its importance for our menacing times and for the transformation being birthed by them cannot be exaggerated.’

Steve has a PhD in Transpersonal Psychology from Liverpool John Moores University. His articles and essays have been published in over 40 academic journals, magazines and newspapers, including The Journal of Humanistic Psychology, The Journal of Consciousness Studies, The Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, Psychologies, Natural Health, Kindred Spirit and Resurgence. His work has been featured widely in the media in the UK, including on BBC Breakfast, BBC World TV, Radio 4 and 5, and in The Guardian, The Independent and The Daily Mail. Steve lives in Manchester, England with his wife and three young children

The Awakening Artist: Madness and Spiritual Awakening in Art is an art theory book that explores the collision of human madness and spiritual awakening in art. It examines a condition of insanity that can be seen in most art movements throughout art history and contrasts that insanity with revelations of beauty, wonder and truth that can also be found in many works of art.

The Awakening Artist references concepts of creativity put forward by Joseph Campbell, Carl Sagan, Albert Einstein, Carl Jung and others. Furthermore, The Awakening Artist discusses many of the world s most important artists who explored the theme of awakening in art including Michaelangelo, Paul Cezanne, Claude Monet, Marcel Duchamp, Morris Graves and many others. Additionally, using concepts of Eastern philosophy, the book presents the case that human creativity originates from the same creative source that animates all of life, and that the artist naturally aligns with that creative source when he or she is in the act of creating.


Patrick Howe has been an artist for over forty years. He lives in Seattle, Washington, where he owns and operates Patrick Howe Gallery,sells his artwork, teaches painting classes and writes books.

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‘The Awakening Artist‘’, by Patrick Howe

Forward by Steve Taylor.

There has always been a very close connection between poetry and spirituality. Many poets have been very spiritually developed individuals, living in a heightened state of consciousness – for example, Wordsworth, Shelley, Whitman, Emily Dickinson, D.H. Lawrence, Ted Hughes and Mary Oliver. And many mystics, gurus and spiritual teachers have also been great poets, such as St. John of the Cross, Sri Aurobindo, Vivekananda and Thomas Merton. Poetry is the natural expression of spiritual experience, which transcends the limits of ordinary language.

In this enlightening – in both intellectual and spiritual senses of the term – book, Patrick Howe shows that the same is true of art. He describes how many of the greatest artists in history were spiritually ‘awake’, and how their ‘wakefulness’ was the source of their art. Artists like Constable, Turner, Caspar David Friedrich, Thomas Cole and George Inness perceived the natural world with a heightened intensity. Whereas most human beings perceive their surroundings through a veil of familiarity, with a functional automatic perception, they saw it with the freshness and first-time vision of children. Rather than experiencing a sense of duality and separateness, they felt a powerful sense of connection to the world. And just as Wordsworth and Whitman had the literary skill to convey their spiritual visions and insights through poetry, these artists had the ability to convey the wonder and intensity they experienced through their paintings.

Arguably, this applied to most of the great painters up to the 20th century. It is certainly true of impressionists like Monet, Pissaro, Renoir and Van Gogh. To look at some of Van Gogh’s paintings is to see the world in a mystical state of consciousness, with spirit-force pervading the sky, the stars and the whole of the natural world. It’s true of Patrick Howe’s own artwork too. As he writes of his own perception, ‘All I have to do is look out any window, walk in any park, study the cooking utensils on any kitchen counter top, or look in almost any direction and I see the beauty and peace of the world.’

One of the great pleasures I’ve had while reading this book is to break off periodically to look up the paintings of some of the artists. As a European who isn’t particularly well-versed in the history of art, I wasn’t familiar with some of the American painters Howe discusses. I had never heard of George Enniss, for example, and looking up his paintings was a delight. He’s become my new favourite painter, alongside my old favourites, Van Gogh, Monet and Turner. I love the way Enniss paints the sky, with just as much as emphasis as the landscape, with the clouds as prominent and beautiful as rocks and trees. It resonates so much with me, because I often see the sky that way too. (I wrote a poem called ‘A world that moves too fast to map’ about the sky in my book The Meaning.)

Throughout this book, Howe shows how the artwork of individuals relates to the culture they are a part of. For example, he suggests that the Romantic movement – in poetry, art and music – was part of what I call the ‘trans-Fall’ movement. (In my book The Fall, I describe this as a movement beyond ego-separateness towards re-connection to nature and the human body, a movement beyond egocentricism towards empathy and compassion.) Howe also makes the important point that, until this time, artists had been in the service of kings, emperors, aristocrats and the church. Their subject matter was always circumscribed by the demands of their benefactors and employers. But in the 19th century, artists became independent for the first time, free to express their emotions, to explore their imagination and perception.

In many ways, the ‘trans-Fall’ movement of reconnection has continued through the 20th century and into the 21st , leading to the environmental movement, increased equality and women’s rights, a spread of democracy, an increased sexual openness, an explosion of interest in spirituality and self-development, the and so forth. But particularly in the last few decades, much European and American artwork has turned against this trend. Modern art is in a very strange position. At least amongst art critics, artists who attempt to convey beauty or a sense of awe or transcendence are seen as redundant. In a climate of post-modern self-consciousness, it has become unfashionable to express any genuine emotion – to do so is to be accused of ‘romantic sentimentality.’ Art has become divorced from reality, and overtaken by the intellect. The word ‘conceptual’ – as in conceptual art – is very apposite. As Partick Howe puts it, ‘Much of art today has lost its “mythic power”…Most art is made for the market and the critics and makes no effort whatsoever at being transformative.’

Rather than a creative ‘right-brain’ pursuit, art has become an intellectual ‘left-brain’ one. In spiritual development, the conceptual mind is seen as a hindrance to overcome. Concepts are the conditioned ideas and cognitive habits we have developed through our upbringing and experience. Through meditation and other forms of spiritual practice, we attempt to quieten the conceptual mind, to weaken its structures, and gain access to a pure, unconditioned consciousness which it can obscure. So in this sense modern art is anti-spiritual. It reinforces the dominance of the conceptual mind. It’s designed to make us think, to shock and provoke, rather than to transform our consciousness and our relationship to the world.

In many ways, then, the sad state of modern art mirrors the worst aspects of our culture, and of ego-consciousness itself – divorced from nature, narcissistic, entangled in theories and concepts, rather than in connection with the present, and the world itself.

But true art is always bigger than the intellect. It always stems from a mysterious transcendent source, rather than from the puny thinking mind. As Patrick Howe points out of his own work, sometimes paintings seem to flow through him without conscious control, so that he doesn’t know what he’ll end up with. Artists in other fields have made the same point. Musicians and poets usually don’t think songs or poems into existence, they come into their minds. They hear the music in their head and transcribe it. In the same way, lines or phrases come to poets in moments of inspiration. Once the kernel of piece of music or poem is there, then the artist can use his or her intellect, to chisel it into a rounded and finished piece. But without the initial non-rational inspiration, there is nothing to work on. (Interestingly, this applies to science too. Many famous scientific discoveries have arisen from unconscious inspiration rather than logical thinking. For example, Niels Bohr won the Nobel Prize after ‘seeing’ the structure of an atom in a dream. One of the triggers of the industrial revolution was the idea of a separate condenser for the steam engine (to stop it losing heat), an idea which spontaneously formed in James Watts’ mind while he was walking across a green in Glasgow.)

In the Awakened Artist, Patrick Howe attempts to re-connect art to this transcendent source. Even without realising, spiritual artists have been part of what he calls ‘the one art movement’, whose role is to encourage the flowering of human consciousness. The artist is both of channel of heightened spirituality, and an ‘agent’ of evolution, helping the rest of the human race to develop the same awareness.

For me, another great thing about this book is how it reminds us that you can’t separate spirituality from other aspects of life. Spirituality isn’t a separate category, it’s a potential quality of every category of life. ‘Spiritually awakened’ individuals aren’t just – or even primarily – monks, gurus or spiritual teachers, they may be painters, poets, musicians, athletes, and so on. They may not even be anyone or anything – just ‘ordinary’ people living in obscurity, doing nothing of any note. They may not even know that they are ‘spiritually awakened.’

So if you are interested in either art or spirituality, this book will be wonderfully inspiring reading. But it will also make you aware that in reality there is no either/or. You can’t separate art and spirituality, in the same way that you can’t separate waves from the sea, or my essential self from yours.


Published on Aug 22, 2015

Are we part of a living universe that evolves grows and is conscious ?

Available now on http://www.CuriosityStream.com: Deepak Chopra’s Curious Minds is a brand new series of intimate dialogues around the science of our universe ..featuring nobel laureates, academics & thought leaders.

Review on Duane Elgin’s “ The Living Universe ” can be viewed HERE

When Emmanuel Sorensen visited Ramana Maharshi in southern India, he was recognized by this sage as “one of the rare-born mystics.” It was during Emmanuel’s third visit to Ramana in 1940 that while he was just sitting quietly in meditation, he awared an effulgence especially radiated and directed upon his form.

Suddenly out of the Silence came a telepathic message from Ramana in the form of these five English words: We Are Always Aware Sunyata. Emmanuel took Ramana’s five words as recognition, initiation, mantra, and name. Thereafter, he referred to both himself and the hut in which he lived as Sunyata – which he translated as “full solid emptiness.”

I am not interested in what men can say with words – I am interested only in what they can say with their Silence. You must realize that men who talk very well, and who utter beautiful speeches, usually have a very bad Silence. What is really important is Silence, for it is a preparation for the Great Silence. Step by step as thou goeth, the Way shall open up to thee- thou art the Tao.

Alfred Julius Emmanuel Sorensen, also known as Sunyata, Shunya, or Sunyabhai, was a Danish mystic, horticulturalist and writer who lived in Europe, India and the US. Wikipedia
Born: October 27, 1890, Denmark
Died: July 13, 1984, Fairfax, California, United States

VIEW HERE

An amazing journey of self-awareness that will transform your life and infuse it with wonder, joy and meaning!

In The Mechanics of Awakening Gary Sherman takes us on a journey beyond ordinary perception to the field of energy and awareness beyond the mind and body, a place within each of us where we discover the essence of ourselves and learn about our self from ourselves so that we can consciously create the life we wish to experience.

With a clarity that is rare, the author distills three primary skills we can use to open the self and its mechanics to self-observation and expanded self-awareness. He provides playful, simple yet profound practices for learning how to utilize these skills within our daily life so that we gain access to our inner life, our thoughts, feelings, beliefs and intuitive promptings, as well as entrance into the larger states of consciousness that support our being.

Gary Sherman has been a psychotherapist and teacher of meditation and self-awareness for over thirty-five years. He began his professional career with a graduate degree in Clinical Social Work from the University of Southern California. He co-founded the Humanistic Psychological Center, a private counseling center in Los Angeles, California that provided psychological services to the general public. Recognizing a greater dimension to human consciousness than his western training provided, Gary began a life-long study of meditation and spiritual practice. After moving to the San Francisco Bay area, Gary intensified his study of meditation with a small group of researchers, who shared his interest in the exploration of expanded consciousness, inner states, and their usefulness in understanding and transforming the quality of one’s life. Throughout his 30-year private practice, Gary provided education and psychological counseling to individuals, families and couples with a broad range of behavioral, emotional, existential, marriage and work related issues. In 2003 he co-founded the Creative Awareness Project in Palo Alto, California.

While sitting in meditation one morning with his wife, Ellen Miller, Gary found himself in an expanded and rarified state of consciousness. While in this state, he felt the impulse to speak. Surrendering to the impulse, he began to speak and deliver a body of experiential knowledge intended to create in its practitioner a perceptual integration, a shift to a new level of consciousness. From this body of knowledge, Gary has designed and delivered classes, workshops and programs teaching self-awareness, expanded perception and inner growth.

Currently, Gary is an educator and teacher, who is committed to exploring our deepest human potential and translating the results into practical knowledge that can be used to elevate our lives. His present work embodies the educational process, called Perceptual Integration that he developed for training others in becoming self-aware.

Click here to browse inside.

Listen to the audio HERE

In the whole of the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, there is no single treatise more deeply revered or widely practiced than A Guide to the Bodhisattva Way of Life. Composed in the eighth century by the Indian Bodhisattva Santideva, it became an instant classic in the curricula of the Buddhist monastic universities of India, and its renown has grown ever since. Santideva presents methods to harmonize one’s life with the Bodhisattva ideal and inspires the reader to cultivate the perfections of the Bodhisattva: generosity, ethics, patience, zeal, meditative concentration, and wisdom.


Biography
B. Alan Wallace began his studies of Tibetan Buddhism, language, and culture in 1970 at the University of Göttingen and then continued his studies over the next fourteen years in India, Switzerland, and the United States. After graduating summa cum laude from Amherst College, where he studied physics and the philosophy of science, he went on to earn his Ph.D. in religious studies at Stanford University. He then taught for four years in the Department of Religious Studies at the University of California at Santa Barbara, and is now the founder and president of the Santa Barbara Institute for Consciousness Studies (http://sbinstitute.com). He is also Chairman of the Thanypura Mind Centre (http://piamc.com) in Thailand, where he leads meditation retreats. He has edited, translated, authored, and contributed to more than forty books on Tibetan Buddhism, medicine, language, and culture, and the interface between science and Buddhism, including Meditations of a Buddhist Skeptic: A Manifesto for the Mind Sciences and Contemplative Practice, Mind in the Balance: Meditation in Science, Buddhism, and Christianity, and Hidden Dimensions: The Unification of Physics and Consciousness.

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An interview with B. Alan Wallace (Norway)

In this interview B. Alan Wallace speaks about Buddhism in the West.

This video is from part of an 2012 interview with B. Alan Wallace. The interview took place in June 2012. At the Karma Shedrup Ling retreat center (part of Karma Tashi Ling) in Oslo, Norway.


In its true sense spirituality is not a plaything or a pastime. It has nothing to do with enhancing you or your status in the dream state. Nor is it about gurus in long flowing robes, secret oral teachings, ancient traditions, or holy books that people claim were written by God. It’s about here and now and you, and whether you are asleep within the dream state or awake within the awakened state.

It is the nature of all dreams that the characters therein are so busy being—well, dream characters—that the bigger reality of what lies outside the dream state eludes them. But then again, dream characters don’t wake up from the dreams they are a part of; the dreamer does. If spirituality is to be meaningful it must address what lies beyond the dream state that most of us create in our minds and humanity lives in day-to-day, for unless we awaken from our personal and collective dreams we will continue to live in a state of unconsciousness on the surface of a life of infinite potential.

Only that which is real and true has the power to liberate us from the mechanical and magnetic draw of the dream state. For ultimately it is ignorance (the belief in things that are untrue) that imprisons us within a trance state, which is induced by taking the conditioned stream of thinking within one’s mind to be true. If we are to awaken from the mind’s hypnotic embrace, we must question all of our beliefs and assumptions down to the very source of our being until that which is true, real, and everlasting reveals itself.

Truth is that which lies beyond the grasp of the dreaming mind. It is not something that can be captured and stated like a fact can. Truth is a timeless reality and therefore sacred in the true sense of the word. Please do not think of truth in mystical terms or even in spiritual terms. Truth refers to the whole of existence and beyond. Truth exists as much in your teacup as it does in your temples and churches. Truth is as present in shopping for your groceries as it is in chanting to God. To think of truth only in spiritual or religious terms is to miss the whole of it, for in doing so you create the boundaries and divisions that are the very antithesis of truth.

Truth is an immeasurable reality not at all separate from your own being. For in the revelation of truth, all beings rest within your being. Put more simply, if you cannot find it now underfoot, I’m afraid that you have missed it entirely.

© Adyashanti 2009


Published on Aug 21, 2015
Consciousness does not need a body in order to know itself.

A product of twenty years of experience guiding students on the spiritual path, this book is an instruction manual for anyone who wishes to walk a mystical path and discover directly whether or not what the mystics say is true. Here you will find the universal teachings and essential practices of the mystics from all the world’s major religious traditions, distilled and presented in generic terms suitable for all seekers, both those who belong to an established religion and those who do not.

About the Author
Joel Morwood is the Spiritual Director of the Center for Sacred Sciences, a non-profit organization dedicated to the study and dissemination of the teachings of the world’s great mystics. Joel is also the author of Naked Through the Gate: A Spiritual Autobiography and Through Death’s Gate: A Guide to Selfless Dying.

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Western Masters of Non-Duality. Joel Morwood: Is a Living Teacher or Guru Necessary?

Joel Morwood discusses if a living Teacher or Guru is necessary.

Pub Date: Sept 24, 2015

Over the past half century the issues facing activists have changed, as has our understanding and awareness of spirituality. For activists, spiritual philosophy is rising up the agenda because it offers distinct, tried and tested approaches to deep questions: Where did it all go wrong? What does it mean to be human? What is the place of leadership? What is the nature of power?

The book begins by defining spirituality for a modern audience of all faiths and beliefs, and goes on to consider the problems and necessities of true leadership. Drawing on a rich history of spirituality and activism, from The Bhagavad Gita, to the Hebrew prophets, to Carl Jung, it is both guide and inspiration for people involved in activism for social or environmental justice.

The text is enriched with tales from the authors own experiences. It contains case studies of inspirational spiritual activists (including Mama Efua, Desmond Tutu, Gerrard Winstanley, Sojourner Truth and Julia Butterfly Hill), which demonstrate the transformative power of spiritual principles in action.

Alastair McIntosh is a Scottish writer, scholar, broadcaster and activist on social, environmental and spiritual issues, raised on the Isle of Lewis. A Fellow of the Centre for Human Ecology, an Honorary Fellow in the School of Divinity at Edinburgh University, and an Honorary Senior Research Fellow in the College of Social Sciences at Glasgow University, he holds PhD in liberation theology and land reform from the University of Ulster.


Matt Carmichael is a climate activist, English teacher, writer and homemaker with a degree in theology from Durham. He was a founder board member of Schumacher North and is the creator of the Delta Course; an intensive course on spirituality for groups of people from any or no religious background.

Spiritual Activism: Leadership as Service

Published on Aug 17, 2015

Alastair McIntosh speaks to co-author Matt Carmichael about their new book, Spiritual Activism: Leadership as Service, published 24th September 2015 in the UK and 1st October 2015 in the USA.

More information at: http://www.greenbooks.co.uk/spiritual…

You can pre-order at amazon: http://www.amazon.co.uk/Spiritual-Act…


Amoda Maa talks about the silence that is available in the midst of everyday life – recorded in San Jose, California (December 2014). More info about Amoda at http://www.amodamaa.com


There’s a deep and un-examined belief that perpetuates the myth of enlightenment: that the ego dies, and with it all emotion, all personality traits, and all personal history.

An enlightened being supposedly has no sense of self and no story, and therefore never talks about themselves, never uses the word “I” or “me” or “mine”, and never refers to “my life”. An enlightened being supposedly sees that the body and the world are an illusion, and therefore is unconcerned with physical well-being or worldly affairs, preferring to stick to the view that there is “no suffering” and so nothing needs to be done.

This image of enlightenment is a fantasy upheld by millennia of religious and patriarchal spiritual tradition .. and it also taps into our child-like need to enter the Kingdom of Heaven or Nirvana where bad things never happen and we are rewarded with endless peace.

If your allegiance is turned 100% towards the truth of awakeness, you will discover that this picture of enlightenment is indeed just a myth. You will discover that the human being continues to function, the personality continues to exist, the ego as a sense of “I’ that negotiates the 3-dimensional world is still intact .. but what is different now, is that all this bows down in service to awakeness.

So yes, in awakening there is a death .. the death of self-identity that is wrapped around ego. But there is also a birth .. the birth of a whole, integrated human being that includes both the surface sense of self as a separate entity – the self that is born and then dies – and the deeper layer of undifferentiated being-ness – the Self that was never born and can never die.

There is a Presence Amidst the Turbulence

There is a presence that is here amidst all circumstances, amidst the turbulence and the calm, amidst the horror and the pleasure.
There is a presence that is unchanging amidst the turning of the seasons, amidst the passing of the hours, amidst the journey from birth to death.
This presence is your sanctuary, your home, your safe haven amidst the storm. It can never leave you nor harm you and neither does it want anything from you. It is simply here waiting in the eternity of this moment, waiting for you to recognize it as your true self.
Be gentle and be brave, my friend .. turn around, turn within and fall into the depth of being, know yourself as this.

Copyright © 2014, Amoda Maa Jeevan. All rights reserved.


Sharon Salzberg teaches on why equanimity is important, and how to foster it.

The fourth Brahma Vihara is equanimity, where the predominant tone is one of calm. In this spacious stillness of mind, we can fully connect to whatever is happening around us, fully connect to others, but without our habitual reactions of rushing toward what is pleasant and pulling away from what is unpleasant. Developing equanimity, in effect, is how we can forge a space between fear and compassion and between sorrow and compassion. This is how we cultivate lovingkindness without it turning into impatient entreaty or demand, “Get happy already, would you!” This is how we expand sympathetic joy.

Without equanimity, we might offer friendship only as long as our offering is acknowledged and appreciated, or as long as someone responds in kind. We would offer compassion to ourselves only when we weren’t overcome by pain, and compassion to others only when we weren’t overcome by their suffering. We would offer sympathetic joy only when we did not feel threatened or envious. When we cultivate equanimity, our tremendous capacity to connect can blossom, for we do not have to push away or cling to anything that may happen.

Sometimes in teaching meditation we say, “Sit like a mountain. Sit with a sense of strength and dignity. Be steadfast, be majestic, be natural and at ease in awareness. No matter how many winds are blowing, no matter how many clouds are swirling, no matter how many lions are prowling, be intimate with everything and sit like a mountain.” This is an image of equanimity. We feel everything, without exception, and we relate to it through our own strength of awareness, not through habitual reactions. Practice sitting like a mountain sometime, allowing all images and feelings and sensations to come and go, as you reside in steadfastness, watching it all arise and pass away.

We Can Do It

Abandon what is unskillful,
One can abandon the unskillful,
If it were not possible, I would not ask you to do so.
If this abandoning of the unskillful would bring harm
and suffering,
I would not ask you to abandon it.
But as the abandoning of the unskillful brings benefit
and happiness,
Therefore, I say, “abandon what is unskillful.”
Cultivate the good,
You can cultivate the good.
If it were not possible, I would not ask you to do it.
If this cultivation of the good would bring harm
and suffering,
I would not ask you to cultivate it.
But as the cultivation of the good brings benefit
and happiness,
Therefore, I say, “Cultivate the good!”

—The Buddha

The-Kindness-Handbook_S.Salzberg_CVRAdapted from “The Kindness Handbook” by Sharon Salzberg. Copyright 2008, 2015 Sharon Salzberg. Published in paperback in August 2015 by Sounds True.

This passage is one of my favorites from the Buddha’s teaching. I think it beautifully exemplifies the extraordinary compassion of the Buddha. The mind of the Buddha sees not good and bad
people, but suffering and the end of suffering, and exhorts those heading toward suffering through greed or anger or fear to take care, to pay attention, to see how much more they are capable of, rather than condemning them. He sees those heading toward the end of suffering through wisdom and lovingkindness and rejoices for them.

It is a passage that inspires our sincere efforts. In the end, these ideas of how to live a better life aren’t something to admire from afar or hold in an abstract way. We need to experiment with them, breathe life into them, see how they affect our minds and hearts, and see where they take us. Turning our lives in the direction of kindness can be done . . . It can only bring benefit and happiness. I can do it. You can do it. Otherwise, the Buddha would not have asked us to do so.

Source:http://www.lionsroar.com

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