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Published on Apr 24, 2017

Throughout the past five years, in the first study of its kind, linguist Lisa Smartt has collected accounts of more than 1,500 final words from those who were a few hours to a few weeks from dying. In this expansive conversation, she decodes the symbolism of those last words, showing how the language of the dying points the way to a transcendent world beyond our own.
For more info on New World Now with Kim Corbin visit http://www.bit.ly/newworldpodcast.


Published on Apr 24, 2017

What happens when we make “sitting in silence” a thing. Silence is not just when you are sitting on your cushion in silence. Silence is is always here. Stillness of being is always here


Published on Apr 23, 2017

Igor Kufayev – excerpt from discourses at the immersion entitled ‘HUMAN BEING: The Gate, The Altar & The Offering’, at Chateaux Frandeux, Belgium, February – March 2017.
Website: http://www.igorkufayev.com


ublished on Apr 23, 2017

Igor Kufayev – excerpt from discourses at the immersion entitled ‘HUMAN BEING: The Gate, The Altar & The Offering’, at Chateaux Frandeux, Belgium, February – March 2017.


Published on Apr 23, 2017

Igor Kufayev – excerpt from discourses at the immersion entitled ‘HUMAN BEING: The Gate, The Altar & The Offering’, at Chateaux Frandeux, Belgium, February – March 2017.
Website: http://www.igorkufayev.com


Published on Apr 20, 2017

Jürgen Ziewe ‘Vistas Of Infinity’ Interview by Renate McNay
Author of ‘The Ten Minute Moment,’ ‘Multi-Dimensional Man,’ and ‘Vistas of Infinity.’
Jürgen started to meditate at an early age and at one point suddenly discovered himself out of his body. At first he didn’t realise what had happened but found confirmation in the books of Carlos Casteneda.
He found that there is a wormhole right in the centre of our brains which can catapult us into a parallel world. This world can be experienced with the same level or greater conscious waking awareness as our physical life.
He talks us through his many dramatic adventures to other worlds and the important realisations that gave him and how through his astral travel he lost his fear of death.
‘Every day I wake up it is the first day of an infinite future.’


Mapping Consciousness and the Enlightened Brain – Deepak Chopra


Published on Apr 21, 2017

A conversation about who or what it is that decides to become aware of being aware.
From weekend in Amsterdam, March 2017.


Robert Holden explains what mysticism is


Published on Apr 22, 2017

What is the universe made of? Deepak Chopra, MD


Published on Apr 22, 2017

Also see https://batgap.com/david-loy/

David Robert Loy is a professor, writer, and Zen teacher in the Sanbo Kyodan tradition of Japanese Zen Buddhism.
He is a prolific author, whose essays and books have been translated into many languages. His articles appear regularly in the pages of major journals and Buddhist magazines. He is on the editorial or advisory boards of the journals Cultural Dynamics, Worldviews, Contemporary Buddhism, Journal of Transpersonal Psychology, and World Fellowship of Buddhists Review. He is also on the advisory boards of Buddhist Global Relief, the Clear View Project, Zen Peacemakers, and the Ernest Becker Foundation.”
For more details about his teachings, visit his website or his YouTube channel. He also has an extensive audio/video library on his website.


Published on Apr 19, 2017

Nonduality teacher Mooji describes what the nature of the Self, your real nature, is. It is closer than you are to yourself. It is your natural state. Listen to Mooji’s pointings and come closer to that which you really are – pure consciousness.

‘Mooji (born Anthony Paul Moo-Young) is a spiritual teacher / nonduality teacher, originally from Jamaica. Mooji is a disciple of the renowned Advaita master Papaji, who himself was a devotee of the advaita and non-dual master Ramana Maharshi. Mooji shares self-inquiry, directing his students to the non-dual Self by encouraging them to question who or what they are at the deepest level. One well known exercise is to identify the natural feeling ‘I am’ or ‘I exist’ and staying with this for 5 to 7 minutes at a time. Another is to come to the recognition that everything (thoughts, emotions, sensations) can be perceived, and then inquiring, “Can the perceiver itself be perceived?’


Video series with क्षणाति Kṣaṇāti Nakṣatra
Ketu is known as the presenter of obstacles, and this inherent energy and nature Ketu manifests deeply in its Karmic Expression.

How to use ancient remedial techniques, contemporary lifestyle practices, Ayurvedic remedies, as well as paradigms or ways of thinking to improve our karmic relationship with Ketu; thereby supporting us to achieve the aim of life and Ketu’s influences in each individual’s karma.

Topics of Discussion in this 2-part video:

1. Ketu’s Karma
2. Ketu through Signs & Nakshatras
3. Ketu’s current transit in Aquarius
4. Improvement of Ketu Karma – Remedial measures
5. SA Community chart interpretation, within the realm of Ketu’s karmic indfuence
6. Webinar live question & answer
7. Summing it all up


Published on Apr 18, 2017

Tara Talks – Reflection: Living in Accord With Our Aspiration – with Tara Brach

If 90% of what we do is determined by feelings (and the other 10% by thinking aimed at rationalizing them)… which domain of feelings is in charge: fight/flight/freeze? Or deeper desires? This reflection helps us become more conscious of the driving forces in our daily lives.


Published on Apr 18, 2017

Stop the search for what is next and discover what is always here.


Published on Apr 18, 2017

How to know God – by knowing yourself part 2 Deepak Chopra, MD


Based on “A Course in Miracles,” bestselling author, Marianne Williamson gives a live talk every Monday in Los Angeles (also available via Livestream anywhere in the world) to teach the principles of “miracle mindedness.” During a talk in late July, she focused on trusting others.

“To the extent to which our thought system is based on fear, or non-miraculous thinking, we bind ourselves to the experience of the world of scarcity and death,” she said. “As we shift our thinking from fear to love, we literally shift into a place where a process of divine intercession — a thought system beyond our own, an actual celestial order of love and harmony — then enters into our experience of this world. Because we transform our thinking, we can transform the effect that thinking has caused.”

“A Course in Miracles” tells us we are perfect, and the core belief and thought within that miracle-minded thought system is the recognition of that perfections, Williamson shared with the audience. However, because the Course tells us we are all connected, meaning there is really only one of us existing in this world, we cannot recognize the perfection of our spiritual being unless we are willing to recognize it in another.

Quoting Lesson 181 from “A Course in Miracles,” Williamson read: “Trusting your brothers is essential to establishing and holding up your faith in your ability to transcend doubt and lack of sure conviction in yourself.”

Trust is a big issue for many people, but only if we trust others can we actually trust ourselves, because any thought we have about another is a thought about ourselves, she said.

“If I think lovingly about you, that is an act of self-care, because I myself will feel ultimately more nourished as I am willing to think more lovingly about you. If I think attack thoughts about you, ‘A Course in Miracles’ says, a sword is dropping over their head and in the realm of reality where there is not time and space, a sword is dropping on me as well.”

Additionally, if we hold the thought and belief that people cannot be trusted, the Course teaches we create what we defend against, so our subconscious mind will set things up in such a way that we will create it. People make mistakes, and we make mistakes, but the question is what we choose to focus on.

“A Course in Miracles” states: “Perception has a focus. It is this that gives consistency to what you see. Change but this focus, and what you behold will change accordingly. Your vision will shift, to give support to the intent which has replaced the one you held before.”

While the ego mind intends to focus on the guilt of another, the spirit within wants to focus on their innocence, Williamson said. We can make a choice to shift our perception in any moment.

“The ego will use your mistakes as evidence for why you deserve it and the spirit in me chooses to extend my perception beyond what the bodies eyes reveal to what the spiritual eye revels, which is the truth in you,” she explained. “I can choose what I intend to see, and when we choose to see the innocence in another person, the Course says this is an act of self-interest, and a gentle reinterpretation of the world. And when we gently reinterpret into miracle mindedness, we see all human behavior as either love, which obviously calls for love to be returned, or as a call for love. In the moment we behave like jerks, the spirit is saying ‘I’m trapped in here. Love me. Because if you condemn me in this place, I’m only going to be worse.’”

marianne-Faith in Sinlessness

Quoting from Lesson 181, Williamson said: “Remove your focus on your brother’s sins and you experience the peace that comes from faith in sinlessness. This faith in sinlessness receives its own sure support from what you see in others past their sins. For their mistakes if focused on are witnesses to sins in you. And you will not transcend their sight and see the sinlessness that lies beyond.”

The Course views sins as errors or mistakes to be corrected. But if we limit our focus to the errors of others, we are also binding ourselves to our own errors, she said. Since the level of our errors is not truly who we are, we cannot feel comfortable I our own skin. The only way we can escape our own feelings of self-hatred is to be willing to have faith in the sinlessness of another.

“This is why ‘A Course in Miracles’ says heaven — which is an awareness of our oneness, and the inner peace that comes from that, not later but in this moment — is entered two by two,” she shared. “I cannot get into heaven unless I am willing to take you there with me. If I am binding you to your guilt, I cannot escape feeling the hell of feeling guilt myself.”

The course says we achieve so little because we have undisciplined minds. Just as we exercise our bodies and discipline our muscles, we must do the same for our minds, Williamson said. The ego can take over, or we can instruct our mind and say, “These attach thoughts only hurt me. I am willing to be miracle minded here.”

“Miracle mindedness in any moment is our willingness in any moment to align our thinking with the will of God. We have been trained to look at the world as ‘Do I want to serve the will of God, or do I want to be happy and I can get what I really need?’ and this is ego-oriented,” Williamson noted. “In any moment, when our goal is the perception of sinlessness, then our goal is to rest in heave — meaning our awareness of our oneness, meaning the place we can be happy, meaning the palce where people want to get along with us, meaning the celestial order where our highest good is already programmed.”

For more from Marianne Williamson, and to sign up for her Free Monday Night Livestream, visit http://www.marianne.com.


Published on Apr 17, 2017

How to know God – by knowing yourself part 1

Dan Millman: On Awakening

Centuries ago, a wanderer came upon another lone traveler walking serenely through a forest in India.

Intrigued by the serene man, unaware that he was in fact the Buddha, the wanderer asked, “Excuse me sir, but — are you a wizard?” The Buddha smiled and shook his head. “Well then,” continued the wanderer, “Are you a great warrior, or a king?” Again, the Buddha said no. “Yet there is something about you — what is it that makes you different from anyone I’ve ever met before?”

“I’m awake,” replied the Buddha.

Whether or not that conversation actually took place, sages and philosophers have sought to understand and experience this phenomenon we call awakening. The Sufis call it fana; the Zen masters refer to states of kensho or satori; the Taoist sages might refer to wu (emptiness, the void); the Hindus speak of nirvana. But let’s go beyond cultural labels and consider the thing (or non-thing) itself.

In order to awaken, we must first recognize that we are asleep. To grasp this idea, we can use an analogy: We know that in our everyday lives, most of us go to sleep at night and experience periods of dreaming as well as deep sleep. Then, in the morning, we awaken from our dream-filled slumber.

The sages of many traditions suggest that even in our so-called waking states, we move through another kind of day-dream, perceiving the world not as it is, but as we are — through a distorting window beliefs, associations, opinions. judgments and meanings we project into the world.

We don’t seem to be dreaming our way through life. In fact, we imagine ourselves fully awake as we work, study, raise children, play sports, and pursue our everyday activities and goals. Yet, as Plato proposed, most people exist in a cave of illusions, mistaking their own shadows, cast by the fire-light and dancing on the walls, as ‘reality.’ Plato compared awakening to the experience of turning away from the shadows — grasping that there is actually a way out of the cave, into the light of the Real World. Today, few of us seek or find a way out. Most are content to gaze at our own imagined realities, entranced, like Narcissus, by the content our own minds, reflected in the pond.

At some point, we may explore and analyze our nocturnal dreams to provide insight into our personalities or divine messages from the subconscious. Others go beyond such analysis to practice lucid dreaming. Lucidity comes the moment we awaken within the dream; that is, we notice we are dreaming. This is no small realization, since when immersed in a dream, it seems real, which is why we may cry out, for example, when having a nightmare. But when we realize: Wait. I’m dreaming this — we become lucid — we can then consciously create whatever we wish within the dream. Being chased by a monster? No problem — we fly away out of its reach or turn it into a daisy. Or we allow ourselves to be devoured and see what follows. Thus awakened, our dreams no longer merely happen to us as actors in a play directed by others; we become the Screenwriter of our dreams.

And just as lucid dreaming bestows conscious creative power in the dream state, it can do the same in our waking state. We can move from lucid dreaming to lucid waking through insight into the nature of our subjective filters — those thoughts, meanings, beliefs, and associations that distort our simple and direct relationship with what is.

The Zen masters call this awakening “nothing special,” only the recognition of suchness or isness — reality as it is, prior to the complications, desires, and concepts we impose upon it. Therefore, awakening is not an achievement, but a noticing.

For this noticing to occur, we need only get out of our own way. But doing so can take time. As G.I. Gurdjieff noted, “One of the best means for arousing the wish to work on yourself is to realize that you may die at any moment. But first, you must learn how to realize this.”

Most of us are blissfully ignorant of any notion of awakening. Content to dream their lives away, they enjoy watching shadows dancing upon the walls. But then something happens that shakes us — a book read, a person met, a moment of insight or a sudden change sends us on a quest for the transcendent: the cave’s exit into the sunlight of the Real. We begin to suspect our assumptions; we no longer believe our beliefs as firmly as before. We cultivate an interest in awakening from our self-sustained dream.

How does one generate such an awakening? There is no single best way; only a way for each individual to discover for himself. But all agree, as Sri Nigasardatta Maharaj reminded his disciples, “One must know the self before one can transcend the self.” So a practice of insight and self-observation is, for many of us, an essential part of our process of awakening.

And it is a process, after all. Although some people imagine that we wake up all at once in a singular, permanent event, like a light switch flipping on, most of us awaken gradually, like a dimmer switch turning up, and then down, and then up again, growing brighter over time. We are like children who, reluctant to wake up, pull the covers over our head. But the Light is persistent, rising higher in the sky of our minds, until we finally open our eyes. We come to accept that life comes at us in waves of change that we cannot predict, control, or deny. We can only learn to surf.

We discover that life is a series of moments: neurotic moments, intelligent moments, and awakened moments. Some explorers tell dramatic stories about their wake-up calls. Others keep it to themselves and smile, remembering Lao Tzu’s note that “Those who Know do not speak (of it) and those who speak (of it) do not know.” Because It, as Alan Watts might remind us, is beyond words. Yet words can provide a wake-up call, and at least point the way.

So we come to the end of these brief notes with the following words: What happens after awakening? Everything changes, yet nothing changes. As the Zen proverb goes: “Before enlightenment, chopping wood and carrying water; after enlightenment, chopping wood and carrying water.” Even so, a single liberating glimpse of reality as it is may represent the most profound and important ‘nothing’ a human being may experience.

Dan Millman, a former world champion athlete, coach, martial arts instructor, and college professor, is author of Way of the Peaceful Warrior (adapted to film in 2006), and numerous other books read by millions of people in 29 languages. Dan teaches worldwide and has influenced people from all walks of life, including leaders in the fields of health, psychology, education, business, politics, sports, entertainment and the arts.

For more information: www. peacefulwarrior.com
Source: AWAKEN


Published on Apr 17, 2017

Also see https://batgap.com/jacqueline-maria-l…

Jacqueline Maria Longstaff began having peak experiences at an early age. She held her first spiritual service – for kids – at age 7. She had a huge heart opening at age 19, but not knowing where to go with this, became a Catholic for a few years and taught in Africa. However, soon she was drawn towards the teachings of the East. The need for religion of any kind dropped after an awakening at the Osho ashram in 1979. She experienced 80 powerful connections with inter-dimensional beings as preparation for her future work.

She was officially an Osho sannyasin for almost 4 years, but her real guru was Swami Devadas, one of Osho’s earliest disciples.

She began guiding others in 1979 and has held courses, retreats and satsangs in many countries. She has been a speaker at conferences in several countries throughout the last 25 years.

In 2003 she began creating an Ashram near the sacred hill Arunachala in South India.

For 7 years she produced and hosted 2-hour radio programs for Radio Lotus in Copenhagen.

She has held three fifteen-month Cosmic Airport training courses – mainly in Scandinavia – training people to assist with conscious birthing, dying, transformation and transcendence.

Her education includes a teaching degree, astrological and esoteric studies, astro- psychology and spiritual psychology studies, and much more.

Website: http://cosmicairport.com

Books: The Cosmic Airport – A vision whose time has come Kaleidoscope – Questions and Answers from Satsangs The Last Waltz: The Enlightened Consciousness Embracing the Collective Shadow Relationship as a Spiritual Pathway: Moving from RelationSHIT to true RelationSHIP

Interview recorded 4/15/2017


Published on Apr 16, 2017

Finding your True Self, the Cure for all Suffering

I’m always writing about depth—deep feelings, deep thoughts, deep relationships. But I know too well that when you focus too much on one quality, its opposite begins to stir, complain, and beg for attention. Could there be something about height that’s important?

For one thing, the spiritual traditions often place the realm of the holy and the most meaningful in the sky, or even beyond it. This is poetry, of course. They’re not talking about literal angels and bodhisattvas in the clouds.

Try a simple experiment. On a clear blue day, look into the sky and simply contemplate it. Feel wonder awaken in you. Notice where your thoughts go. The sky can spark your imagination to consider the most important matters in life and your highest ambitions and ideals. Do the same with a night sky and contemplate the mysterious black vastness. You may well get to thinking about the mystery of it all and your place in the cosmos.

This simple practice of stopping, looking, and wondering can be a powerful ritual. But you may find other rituals that inspire you to transcend yourself. Being intimate with other aspects of the natural world; chanting or handwriting or reading deeply the world’s spiritual literature; doing a sparkling job of teaching or parenting; listening to or playing inspired music—all these natural experiences can be more than an emotional peak experience. They can place your life high in the sky, at the edge of your reality, making you dizzy with possibility and awe.

One of the most serious problems we have had with religious means of transcendence, of being identified with our highest self, has been to take it all too literally. Instead of seeing the sky as a metaphor, so many have expected some physical being to appear divinely in that region. We have also lost touch with an inner transcendence, a personal sky, and a sensation of being close to our ideals and to our cosmic destiny.

The profound ancient Greek philosopher Herakleitos once wrote: “The way up and the way down are one and the same.” But what does this mean? Perhaps that it’s necessary to go both up and down, or that you discover the same mystery upward or downward. Maybe we shouldn’t make such a distinction between ascending and going deep.

A clue may be hidden in the very old document known as the Emerald Tablet, used by alchemists and others. This is a long, mysterious statement often summarized to mean “as above, so below.” The world we discover in our highest meditations is reflected in the realm of ordinary life or deep in our psyche. The Christian theologian Origen said, “We all have a sky within.”

What all this means is that the transcendence that inspires us and charges our souls with wonder and idealism takes us up out of our current condition, but at the same time it is immanent—deeply personal and down in the glowing heart of nature and of things.

This idea of our highest self being mirrored in our deepest experiences holds our world together. We can do everything possible to be in touch with the unknown vastness of possibility, while also working out our painful past, our daily work and challenging relationships. In fact, as long as we do the one openly and with constancy, we can achieve the other.

Belief is not quite the right action for the highest self. It has to go further by seeing no end to the discovery of what the world and life are all about. The language we use may seem fixed and unchanging—God, eternity, and even the infinite—but the opening up of that language to mystery is one of the important things we can do if we are to truly stand at the edge of our world and glimpse the enlivening mystery of it.

It helps to have concrete methods of maintaining a higher self: sublime art, generous service to humanity, regular contemplative practices, extraordinary love and sex, work that contributes, and exploration of the world. We may have to find our own particular practices that make a hole in the sky—keep us open to the mysteries.

Part of you is always growing and maturing, and that process will never stop. Be faithful to that process and you will know in your own being what transcendence is. Your endless discoveries will help you appreciate the endless mysteries of life itself. In this way, your highest self is not just an idea. You feel its presence, and endless transcending becomes a way of life.
Source: SPIRITUALITY & HEALTH

 

Thomas Moore has been a monk, a musician, a professor, and for the past 30 years a psychotherapist practicing archetypal therapy with a spiritual perspective. His latest book is The Soul of Christmas, from Franciscan Media.


Published on Mar 5, 2017

La poesía del arte! El artista turco Garyp Ay recrea, aquí, la célebre pintura “La noche estrellada” del artista holandés Vincent Van Gogh.
El tema musical “Starry, starry night” fue escrito y cantado por el cantautor estadounidense Don McLean como un homenaje al famoso genio de la pintura holandés.

Translation
The poetry of the art! The Turkish artist Garyp Oh recreates, here, the famous painting “The starred night” of the Dutch artist Vincent Van Gogh.
The musical topic “Starry, starry night” was written and sung by the American singer-songwriter Don McLean like a homage to the famous Dutch genius of the painting.

Category
Education
License
Standard YouTube License
Music
“Vincent” by Don McLean (iTunes)


Published on Apr 15, 2017

Living the life you want.


It has been said that life is experience. It is indeed the only place where life exists. In recognition of this, to really get something out of the experience, it’s necessary to commit one’s self to being in the here and now as opposed to living the effects of the past. If you can distinguish the difference, then you have the keys to personal effectiveness, achievement and happiness.

How do you do this? Let me start with an analogy…

Remember when you were a child, and your earliest walks in the park? You may remember that during those walks everything around you was so clear — the beauty of nature, the unexplored and the great unknown — and how it made you feel so alive and in the here and now. Then, as you grow, the next few times you didn’t feel quite so alive, because you got the idea that you’ve ‘seen those things in the park before.’ Then, as time went on, you felt even less invigorated by the experience than previously, for the same reason as before, and so on. Now, by the time you have reached adulthood, you don’t pay that much attention to the beauty of the surroundings while walking in the park — you’ve seen it all before! This ‘seen it all before’ feeling means you are no longer truly present, or feeling truly ‘alive’ with life in that moment.

However, something can happen that allows you to see things in a different light. It might be that you’re in such a good mood, or it’s a beautiful carefree morning, or for no reason whatsoever, you suddenly find yourself blissfully in the here and now while walking in the park. Notice this when it happens!

Because you’re in this state, you look around and notice things you hadn’t seen before. The shades of green on a grassy verge, the leaf venation on the different trees come right into your attention in the moment, then you distinguish the different birds surrounding you. You hear things that you may not have been aware of before. In other words you realize you had not ‘seen it all before’ because living in the here and now means seeing some of the infinite details in things you hadn’t observed before.

Now we can take this further. It’s not just about seeing things in the park, it’s about being mindful of life in general. When making an ongoing commitment to being in the here and now you have the keys to personal effectiveness. It is an opportunity for achievement because:

1. It allows creative moments to happen: For example, when fully present, you see a project you have on the go in a different light, which allows you to bring something new into existence and into being.

2. It gives rise to realization or insight: Insights or realizations in the moment enable you to go on to achieve things that you would not have been able to do without those realizations or insights.

3. You may recognize something new: You may observe something new that was not distinguished before (attention to detail) by others. By observing something new it could mean seeing things in a ‘new light’, prompting a whole new direction.

4. Creating a clear head without thought or distraction can allow the self to be peaceful, calm and healthy: An example of this is in the benefits of meditation as a commitment to being in the here and now.

5. Just be in the bliss, the beauty, and benefit what life has to offer!

So, what could you get out of renewing your commitment to yourself to being in the here and now?


Published on Apr 15, 2017

Sruti is a spiritual teacher who writes about finding God within an experience with an uncommon and painful illness called Interstitial Cystitis. She has been interviewed on the Buddha at the Gas Pump talk show on YouTube about her experience of spiritual awakening in the midst of intense pain: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=atG0z…

This ongoing and chronic condition challenged her to stay present with daily pain and to look further inward for answers. In an extreme moment of pain, in which consciousness began to fade, Sruti experienced the erasure of all that clouds over the earliest source of vision.

She watched as one by one the layers of the mind, the body and feelings disappeared before her. She asks the question: Who is the One that Can Never Leave You? With whose vision are we seeing when the lights are going out? Has this early vision ever known anything at all?


Published on Dec 21, 2016

Presentation given in Nov 2016 at Kingsbury Hall in Salt Lake City, Utah at the World Parliament on Spirituality 2016.


Published on Apr 13, 2017

https://www.scienceandnonduality.com

Katherine T. Peil: Founding Director of non-profit EFS International, whose mission is fostering global emotional wisdom. From a background in Pantheistic spirituality and clinical and social psychology, her lengthy interdisciplinary inquiry into the biophysical substrates of emotion led to the identification of its previously mysterious biological function: as an ancient “self-regulatory sense” – an evaluative perceptual mechanism through which living systems directly participate in self-organizing and evolutionary processes, and one that invites deeper inquiries into the physics of consciousness.

This new science also casts light upon innate “biovalues, which scientific methodology has long avoided, as well as vital processes that inform common spiritual experiences, and the healthy development of empathic moral conscience. It provides a biophysically informed vision of “naturalistic spiritualty”, one that echoes the common wisdom across the great religious traditions, while challenging such time honored assumptions as “sin” and the “good and evil” dichotomy.


Published on Apr 13, 2017

A discussion about the stages of understanding and the definitions of Knowing, Awareness and Consciousness.
From the seven day retreat at Mercy Center October 2015.


Published on Apr 13, 2017

Pamela Wilson celebrates 20 years of being on the road worldwide sharing Truth, Clarity, Love and the Joy of Being. Her new book The Golden Retriever’s Guide to Joy is a distillation of everything she has noticed within, reading the Book of Life, within Stillness. She delights in getting to the Heart of the Matter, literally, finding the intelligent presence within all form and function. And then showing it its true nature.So, that emotion, sensation, the body and the mind can also return and stabilize as balanced rooted spaciousness. Join the fun, Life is simple within its complexity!

Interview recorded 4/11/2017


Published on Apr 13, 2017

http://adyashanti.org – Adyashanti explores the immensity of silence that permeates every moment. In the midst of immense noise, by noticing how quietness permeates each and every layer of existence, you can allow yourself to rest in this foundational silence. As you rest, without the energy of grasping or pushing away, you can access a deeper dimension of being. Adyashanti invites you to notice the silence that lives within every moment and experience the totality of each moment.

Video Excerpted From “Purity of Being”(DVD #64):
http://bit.ly/2p5uZfK

Quotes from this Video:

“In the midst of all this noise — whether it was the wind, the rain coming down beating on the roof and the deck outside, or the talk that she was giving — I started to notice that that moment was permeated with this great stillness, this immensity of quiet.”

“When I spontaneously listened to the whole of it, this other intuitive sensory organ opened up and I could hear all of it — the words, the rain, the wind, the silence. Nothing was preferred, nothing was being grasped at, nothing was being pushed away — all of it had equal value.”

“We are conditioned towards what is obvious, glaring, and noisy — whether it’s something on the outside or something on the inside. We’re not so much taught to value things that aren’t noisy — the things that aren’t trying to grab our attention.”

“Silence is the deepest teacher, it’s the deepest teaching — that’s what gives you access to the deeper dimension of being.”

Facing Your Inner Battles

The strength to face the challenges in our life always rewards us with a refinement and evolution of our soul regardless if we win or lose the battle.

We all strive to live our soul’s purpose, but sometimes our mind conflicts with our feelings and causes confusion. The Bhagavad Gita is an ancient Hindu text that has an important teaching for those of us who experience this internal struggle. In this story, Arjuna the peaceful warrior is faced with a choice to act or not act in what he feels is a no-win situation for himself. If you have ever felt confusion or inner conflict holding you back, then the timeless wisdom in this story can bring clarity and relief.

Ahimsa is the principle of non-violence, which is a fundamental tenet of Hinduism. It is rooted in the belief that all lives, both human and non-human, are sacred. This is why on the eve of a great war, the choice between duty and non-violence leaves Arjuna in a state of inner conflict in this story. Being a peaceful warrior requires you to stand firmly in your spiritual path, dharma, but sometimes we don’t have the clarity to know what the best choice is. This requires an active fearlessness and non-attachment, which is embodied in the famous parable of Arjuna and Krishna’s discussion on the battlefield.

Arjuna is faced with inner conflict about going into battle.

The story begins with a young prince, Arjuna, who realizes that the enemies he’ll be fighting in an upcoming battle are his own relatives, beloved friends, and revered teachers. He turns to his charioteer confessing his conflicting emotions and his fears. His charioteer is actually the eternally wise Krishna. Here Arjuna talks to Krishna about his confusion:

…it is not proper for us to kill our own kinsmen, the sons of Dhritarashtra. For how, Krishna, shall we be happy after killing our own relatives? If the sons of Dhritarashtra, weapon in hand, should kill me in battle, me weaponless and not defending myself, that would be better for me. – Bhagavad Gita

As he contemplates no action at all and allowing his enemies to kill him, he hopes to stay true to his dedication to non-violence (ahimsa), but Krishna recognizes this as a cop-out. Compassion is said to come in the form of a lamb and a lion. We must accept that we are not perfect. This humility allows each of us to evolve forward from the place that we stand, rather than jump to absolute ideals.

Compassion is said to come in the form of a lamb and a lion.


Though Arjuna has mentally justified that he is being fearless and selfless to let his enemies kill him unarmed, he is actually avoiding his own dharma and here Krishna reminds him of this:

One’s own duty, though defective, is better than another’s duty well performed. – Bhagavad Gita

This is a call to hone one’s own inner voice and stay true to it; trusting that there are no wrong choices, only lessons to be learned. Duty is usually associated with something we don’t want to do, but it can feel quite empowering once we accept our role in a situation. When I was in my 20s, I was passionate about the environment and saving the world, but I was broke. I had gone past being able to be picky about a job that would help me pay the bills or feed myself, so I begrudgingly took a job as a landscaper.

Swinging a pick-axe in the hot sun, I was given the task of putting irrigation lines in to grow plants and grass that should not have been planted in the arid climate of Arizona. Non-native, drought-tolerant plants waste precious water in the desert landscape. I was miserable while I worked and felt a bit self-righteous about my sustainability ideals. Angry at the universe that I should have to do such a lowly chore, I put my nose to the grindstone and woke up early every day to make ends meet.

We need to find the warrior within and face our own dharma. Photo by Robert Sturman.


If you have ever felt conflicted about your life path then you will understand this feeling. In acceptance of the task at hand comes a certain humility, self-compassion, a sense of service, mental liberation, and even empowerment. This is central to karma yoga, which teaches us not to be attached to the outcome of our work, but to do it as a form of devotion to our own inner evolution.

Your business is with action alone; not by any means with the fruit of action. Let not the fruit of action be your motive to action. Let not your attachment be fixed on inaction.Therefore, always perform action, which must be performed, without attachment. For a man, performing action without attachment attains the Supreme. – Krishna to Arjuna

Even the most mundane actions in our day-to-day life are the result of choices we have made. The parable of Arjuna’s indecision on the battlefield is an extreme expression of this common circumstance and that is why it holds such value for us today. With clarity of mind, or mindfulness, along with personal accountability and non-attachment to outcome, we can have the courage to face any battle. A situation can be terrifying and feel like life or death even if it is not. The strength to face the challenges in our life always rewards us with a refinement and evolution of our soul, regardless if we win or lose the battle.

Mindfulness gives us the power to face any daily battle. Image by Alberto Montt.

To one that is born, death is certain; and to one that dies, birth is certain. Therefore, you should not grieve about things that are unavoidable. – Krishna to Arjuna

Sometimes it is the fear itself that dies (or an ego death) on this journey. Each one of us is here at this time for something greater than we can know or understand. The world is filled with terrifying possibilities, and mistakes are easy to come by. Sometimes the fear of making the wrong choice is more scary than the choices themselves, yet we are all here to fail as much as we are here to succeed.

Anyone with great success can also boast many failures. In this process, we learn to be more compassionate to ourselves and to those who have wronged us with their own poor behavior. The journey of soul evolution continues regardless. We must always put one foot in front of the other, and the path will appear with each step.

In this path to final emancipation, nothing that is commenced becomes wasted effort; no obstacles exist; and even a little of this form of sacred duty protects one from great danger. – Krishna to Arjuna

Put one foot in front of the other and the path will appear.

Knowing that we are in line with our dharma, and on the path (not the right path or the wrong path, just on the path), we begin to liberate and empower ourselves. These ancient parables, like the one told in the Bhagavad Gita, are meant to remind us of the eternal challenges that humans face and how to conquer our demons, even if we’d rather do nothing. Arjuna contemplates not taking up arms in battle, but after speaking with Krishna he follows his dharma and fights.

Being a peaceful warrior does not mean that you should be without your sword, as you never know when you might be called to unsheathe it. You can stand fearlessly in whatever circumstance you may face, knowing that you are not alone on the journey to personal evolution.


Published on Apr 12, 2017

Jürgen Ziewe ‘The Ten Minute Moment’ Interview by Iain McNay
Author of ‘The Ten Minute Moment,’ ‘Multi-Dimensional Man,’ and ‘Vistas of Infinity.’ After 40 years of meditation which had gradually taken him to deeper and deeper places Jürgen went on a 7 day personal retreat in as remote cabin in Scotland. He meditated most of the day and experienced a profound awakening….

‘After a meditation I slowly opened my eyes and sized up my surroundings – my body had become part of the furniture. I could still perceive the external world through my eyes but my body had turned into a shell – a cardboard cutout – reality was being stripped away before my eyes. I could no longer be sure of what was happening – it was beyond and outside anything I had come to know. The stillness was too vast in its scope to be grasped. There was no reality as I knew it. The thing is it has always been different but I hadn’t noticed. It was reality stripped of any familiarity. I could almost not bear it. For a moment I wanted to go back. In an instant I recognised that I was just a thought; an imagination without no substance.
This was the death of all deaths. I had arrived at zero point. I was about to be surrendered and reabsorbed into the source. One more step and there would be no return – I was staring into the merciless face of God.’

He also talks us through his life, how he refused to accept that the 5 senses was all there is to reality and how that led to a life long quest to find out who or what this consciousness was conscious of.


Published on Apr 12, 2017

If the doctors had been right, Anita Moorjani would not be alive today.
Now an international speaker and New York Times best-selling author, Anita had been given mere hours to live by her doctors on the morning of February 2, 2006. Unable to move and in a deep coma caused by the cancer that had ravaged her body for nearly four years, Anita entered another realm where she experienced great clarity and understanding about her life and purpose here on earth. In that realm, she was given a choice of whether to return to life or continue on into death. Anita chose to return to this life when she realized that heaven is a state, not a place. Because of this awareness, she made a remarkable and complete recovery within weeks of coming out of the coma. When she shared her story of healing and the insights she gained from her experience in the other realm, it went viral on the internet, receiving enormous interest internationally.

The 2012 book she wrote about her experience, Dying to Be Me (published by Hay House), hit the New York Times bestseller list within two weeks of its release, remaining there for nine weeks. The book has since been translated into 45 languages and has sold over one million copies worldwide.

Anita’s new book, What If This Is Heaven? (Published September 13 2016 by Hay House), debunks 10 common cultural myths most of us have accepted without question that keep us from experiencing heaven on earth.

Now completely cancer-free, Anita travels the globe, giving talks and workshops, as well as speaking at conferences and special events.

Watch interview with Anita Moorjani telling about her NDE: https://youtu.be/-DExbitdDfA

Norwegian subtitles by Vanja Riksfjord.

Steve Taylor’s latest book is The Leap: The Psychology of Spiritual Awakening. His previous books include The Calm Center. He is a senior lecturer in psychology at Leeds Beckett University and one of Watkins Mind Body Spirit magazine’s “100 Most Spiritually Influential People.” He lives in Manchester, England. Visit him online at http://www.StevenMTaylor.com.

What does it mean to be enlightened or spiritually awakened?

I don’t think there’s anything particularly esoteric about the state, and I don’t associate it with religions. I think of it as a shift into a more expansive, higher-functioning state of being – a state in which we experience a strong sense of connection with the world around us and other beings, a sense of inner quietness and spaciousness, and a heightened awareness of our surroundings. The state isn’t without its challenges, particularly in its early stages (when there may be some confusion and psychological disturbance) but in general it brings an enhanced sense of ease and well-being. It’s quite common for people to shift into this state after intense psychological turmoil. In my book Out of the Darkness, I describe many examples of this. It is also not uncommon for people to move towards this state slowly and gradually, over many years of spiritual practice (such as meditation) or through following specific spiritual paths, such as the eightfold path of Buddhism or a monastic lifestyle.

What are the three different types of wakefulness?

First of all, there is natural wakefulness. For a small minority of people, wakefulness is simply their natural, normal state. They were always in a state of wakefulness, without undergoing a sudden transformation and without following spiritual practices and paths. These people often become creative artists, like poets and painters.

Secondly, there is gradual wakefulness. This happens to people who follow spiritual practices or paths, or it might just happen as a result of their lifestyle, or events that happen to them. Wakefulness occurs gradually over years and decades. They gradually move into a more expansive and intense state of being.

Finally, there is sudden wakefulness. As I just mentioned, some people undergo a sudden and dramatic shift into wakefulness. Most frequently, this happens in the midst of intense psychological turmoil e.g. a diagnosis of cancer, bereavement, addiction etc. The turmoil breaks down a person’s normal sense of identity, and this enables a new sense of identity to emerge inside them. They shift a more expansive, higher-functioning state of being – in other words, into the wakeful state.

How can we tell the difference between fraudulent spiritual teachers and the genuinely awakened?

It’s a question of finding out whether they possess all of the characteristics of wakefulness. Some of the characteristics of the state are well known – a sense of well-being, a transcendence of separation, a quiet mind, heightened awareness. But there are some less well known characteristics – e.g. awakened people don’t have a sense of group identity, or feel the need to acquire possessions or wealth or power. They don’t feel the need to be admired, or feel hurt by criticism. They live very morally, without exploiting anyone.

So if a so-called spiritual teacher doesn’t display these characteristics then you should question whether they are genuinely awakened. Typical signs of a fraudulent teacher include living an accumulative lifestyle, needing followers around them to make them feel important, behaving immorally, not living altruistically or showing compassion, being wounded by slights, cultivating a sense of group identity amongst their followers, and showing signs of prejudice or enmity towards other groups. If your teacher shows any of these characteristics then you can be sure that they are not awakened.

How do different theories of consciousness explain (or try to debunk) mystical (or awakening) experiences?

Some psychologists and neuroscientists think that awakening experiences can be explained in terms of brain activity – that is, they are caused by abnormal types of activity in different parts of the brain, producing more intense perception, a lack of subject-object boundaries etc. In other words, they are a kind of hallucination.

I think this is highly dubious. For a start, the assumption that the brain is the source of our conscious experience is dubious. Some scientists assume that the brain gives rise to consciousness, just because they can’t think of any way of explaining it, but despite decades of intensive research, no one has the slightest idea how this might occur. In philosophy, this is called the ‘hard problem’ of how the soggy gray mass of the brain could give rise to the amazing richness and variety of our conscious experience. In fact, it’s just as to reverse this suggest that, if there are any particular brain states associated with awakening experiences, these states could be produced by the experiences themselves, rather than the other way around.

As a psychologist I’ve never been particular interested in studying the brain, and working how it which parts of it are active or inactive in different states. To me, that’s like studying a map of a place rather than exploring it as a reality.

Wakeful states exist in themselves, as experiences, and can’t be reduced to – or explained away in terms of – neurological activity.

Is it possible to awaken through psychedelics?

Psychedelics can definitely generate temporary awakening experiences, but it’s very unlikely that they will bring about a shift into permanent wakefulness. The reason for this is that psychedelics work by dissolving away our normal sense of self, and putting its psychological mechanisms out of action. This can cause temporary awakening experiences, but permanent wakefulness can only occur if there is a new sense of self to replace the normal one. It’s not enough to dissolve the sense of self – a new self has to replace it.

In fact, the danger of the regular use of psychedelics is that the structures of the normal mind permanently dissolve away, without anything to replace them, and so there’s just a psychological vacuum, or a state of psychosis. And unfortunately there have been many cases of this. In fact, you could say that this is really the only permanent psychological change which the regular use of psychedelics can bring: not awakening, but psychosis.

Having said that, I think psychedelics can have a positive effect, if they are used carefully. Although they rarely bring about permanent transformation, they can sometimes cause a shift in values and perspectives, make people see the world in a different way and re-evaluate their lives. They can provide a glimpse into a more intense reality that makes them realise that their normal view of life is limited. This sometimes creates an interest in spiritual practices and traditions, as a way of trying to recapture this vision of the world in a more integrated way. Look at Ram Dass! He’s the best example of this – a Harvard psychologist who took LSD, re-evaluated his life, became a spiritual seeker, and eventually one of the most inspired spiritual teachers of our time.

Are children naturally awake?

Yes! Certainly young children. Some spiritual traditions associate childhood with wakefulness, and see spiritual development as a matter of recovering qualities of our childhood state. The Dao De Ching advises us to ‘Return to the state of the infant.’ One of Jesus’ most famous sayings is ‘unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven.’

Children definitely have many of the characteristics of the wakefulness state – more intense perception, well-being, a strong sense of connection to the world around them, heightened energy, a lack of the need for group identity, of the need to accumulate, and so on. However, there are some significant differences between childhood wakefulness and the kind of wakefulness we attain as adults. For example, children don’t possess characteristics intense compassion, or inner quietness and stability. So children are naturally awake, but they’re not awake in quite the same way as adults. It’s a kind of immature wakefulness, which isn’t as wide-ranging as mature wakefulness.

What are the signs that the human race is undergoing a collective awakening?

I would say that there are five signs. The first four relate to individual experiences of wakefulness.

First of all, wakefulness seems to be natural for a small minority of people. There are some people who aren’t awake due to a sudden transformation, or to decades of regular spiritual practice – wakefulness is simply their normal, natural state.

The second sign is that temporary awakening experiences are very common, and seem to getting more common. As I showed in my previous book, Waking from Sleep, it’s very common for people to have temporary glimpses of the wakeful state, often when they’re inactive and relaxed, and their minds become quiet and calm. For a few moments, our normal ‘sleep’ state slips away and the wakeful state emerges, like the sun from behind a wall of clouds.

The third sign is that more and more people are feeling a strong impulse to awaken. More and more people seem to sense instinctively that something is wrong with their normal state of being. They’re aware that they’re asleep, and they want to wake up. This suggests that our sleep state is losing its hold over us.

The fourth sign is that awakening occurs so spontaneously and easily in response to psychological turmoil. As I’ve said before, it’s not uncommon for people who go through intense stress and turmoil to undergo a sudden shift into the wakeful state. Their previous identity dissolves away, and a new self emerges, like a butterfly emerging from a chrysalis. In my research, I’ve always been amazed at how common this phenomenon is, and I think that it’s becoming more common.

Finally, there are cultural signs that this shift is underway. These have been growing for the last three hundred years or so. Since the 18th century, in many parts of the world, there has been a growing sense of empathy, compassion and fairness. There has been an increasing recognition of the rights of different groups, including animals. There has been a reconnection to nature, to the human body, and an openness to sex, And particularly over recent decades, there has been a massive (and still growing) upsurge in interest in spiritual philosophies and the spread of spiritual practices such as meditation, yoga, and other techniques of self-development. Everywhere there are signs of a movement beyond both ego-isolation and egocentrism, a growing sense of connection and empathy.

Even if this process is a gradual and fitful one — and even if it may appear to be still in its early stages — we appear to be in the process of waking up.


Culadasa (John Yates, Ph.D.) is a meditation master with over four decades of experience in the Tibetan and Theravadin Buddhist traditions. He taught physiology and neuroscience for many years at the Universities of Calgary and British Columbia. Later, he worked at the forefront of healthcare education and therapeutic massage, serving as the founding director of the West Coast College of Massage Therapy. Culadasa retired from academia in 1996, moving with his wife into an old Apache stronghold in the Arizona wilderness, where they deepened their spiritual practice together. He currently leads the Dharma Treasure Buddhist Sangha in Tucson, Arizona and holds retreats across the United States.

In addition to teaching meditation, Culadasa is the author of the groundbreaking book, A Physician’s Guide to Therapeutic Massage, which has been through several editions and is still frequently used in classrooms today. He is also a lifelong sitar player and an amateur woodworker, with several hand-carved canoes hanging from the ceiling of his workshop. His wife Nancy and he run Cochise Stronghold Canyon Nature Retreat, a nationally recognized B&B featured in the travel section of The New York Times.

Culadasa’s forthcoming book, The Mind Illuminated, is the first comprehensive guide to Buddhist meditation for a Western audience. It combines age-old teachings with the latest research in cognitive psychology and neuroscience, providing meditators with step-by-step guidance for every stage of the path – from your very first sit, all the way to mastery of the deepest states of peace and insight. This is the clear, friendly, and in-depth meditation manual that people have been waiting for.


Published on Apr 10, 2017

What is the best way to deal with our emotions? In a conversation with Hillary Larson spiritual teacher Gangaji shares her wisdom about emotions. According to Gangaji the best way to deal with emotions is to be totally open to them and to experience them deeply. There is no need to create stories or judgments about emotions. If we just allow them to happen, naturally intelligence will come and this is what will help us to deal better with them.

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Published on Apr 10, 2017

This short composition is a poetic tribute, a window into the inner dimension of Igor’s work and his community Flowing Wakefulness, which serves as a container for the spontaneous flow of Grace.

Created by Prema S. Landbauer. Photography courtesy of Flowing Wakefulness, captured at the 7-day immersion and a 3-day spillover at Château Frandeux, Belgium February-March 2017.

Website: http://www.igorkufayev.com

One of the biggest myths about spirituality is that it reveals the world to be an illusion. According to the myth, when we ‘wake up’ or become enlightened, we realise that the physical realm of things is just a dream. The world and all the events that take place in it are seen as a mirage. Only spirit is real, which exists above and beyond the physical world.

One of the problems with this view is that it leads to a detached and indifferent attitude to worldly events. What does it matter if millions of people are suffering from poverty and starvation? What does warfare or ecological catastrophe matter? Why should we bother trying to fight for social causes or against global problems? It’s all just part of the dream, so none of it is of any consequence.

This attitude is often justified with reference to the Hindu concept of maya. This is sometimes translated as “illusion,” but its actual meaning is actually closer to “deception.” Maya is the force that deceives us into thinking of ourselves as separate entities and the world as consisting of separate, autonomous phenomena. In other words, maya prevents us from seeing the world as it really is. It blinds us to the unity that lies behind apparent diversity. It stops us from seeing the world as brahman, or spirit. So it doesn’t literally mean that the world is an illusion, but that it’s not as it seems. It means that our vision of the world is not complete or objective, that there’s more to reality than we superficially see.

The idea of the world as an illusion is sometimes specifically associated with Hindu Advaita Vedanta (or nonduality) philosophy, but this interpretation of Advaita stems from a similar misunderstanding. The most influential Advaita Vedanta philosopher was Sankara, who lived during the eighth and nineth centuries ce. Sankara famously made three statements (later reframed by Ramana Maharshi and others): “The universe is unreal. Brahman is real. The universe is Brahman.” If the first two statements are taken alone and out of context — as they often are — then they suggest a duality between the world and spirit: the world is an illusion, and only spirit is real. But the third statement, which is often overlooked, completely reverses this. The third statement says that the universe is spirit, and so the universe actually is real. Sankara is not literally saying that the universe is unreal, only that it doesn’t have an independent reality. It depends on brahman for its existence; it’s pervaded with brahman, and it can’t exist without it.

Ramana Maharshi (pictured), perhaps the greatest Indian sage of the twentieth century, held a similar view. He explained that the world is not unreal in itself. It becomes so when we perceive it purely in terms of its appearance and only see interacting separate objects rather than an underlying spirit. That world is unreal in the same way that a dream is unreal, because it’s based on delusion. But in itself the world is inseparable from spirit. It’s a manifestation of spirit.

This is exactly what wakefulness reveals — not that the world is an illusion but that the world as we normally see it is incomplete, a partial reality. In wakefulness, the world actually becomes more real, partly in the sense that it becomes more tangibly real and alive, more vivid and powerfully there, but also in the sense that it becomes infused with spirit. In wakefulness, we realize that there’s no duality, no matter or spirit, no matter or mind. We realize that the physical world and the spiritual world are one, with no distinction. The world is gloriously infused with spirit and gloriously real.

Nevertheless, the idea of the world as an illusion is appealing to many people, as it offers a way of circumventing problems. If you’re facing difficulties in your own life, and if the world itself is full of the suffering of your fellow human beings, then it’s comforting and convenient to tell yourself, “Oh well, it’s all just an illusion, so there’s no need to worry.” In other words, it offers a means of spiritual bypassing, that is, using spiritual beliefs as a way of escaping issues that need addressing.

A similar attitude is sometimes applied to the body. After all, the body is made of the same stuff as the world, so if the world is an illusion, the body must be too, or at least it can be seen as something different and inferior to the mind or spirit. There’s a duality between the spirit and the body, just as there’s a duality between the spirit and the physical world. This attitude can lead to a hostile, repressive attitude toward the body, an attitude of disgust toward its animalistic functions and impulses, including sex. This attitude is illustrated by early Christian Gnostic teachings, for example, which held that all matter is evil, and the body is a prison to escape from. But again, in wakefulness this duality is revealed to be false. The body is infused with spirit and is one with spirit. As Walt Whitman writes in “I Sing the Body Electric,” after listing dozens of different parts of the body, “O I say these are not the parts and poems of the Body only, but of the soul, O I say now these are the soul!”

Steve Taylor Phd is a senior lecturer in psychology at Leeds Beckett University, UK. This is an edited extract from his new book The Leap. More information
HERE

World transformation involves replacing old paradigm theories and practices that have held back humanity’s progress since time immemorial. To be an effective replacement, the new paradigm approaches with their innovative theories and practices need first and foremost to offer definitive humanitarian solutions for the co-creation of a world that makes a difference for everyone.

In light of this need for world transformation, here are 7 old-to-new paradigm-shifting humanitarian solutions.

1. Organizations

Old paradigm: Parasitical, hierarchical, controlling pyramids, emphasising competitiveness.

New paradigm: Essentially, no hierarchy, decentralized organizations, emphasising co-operation.

In the current old paradigm, the organizational classes whom make up the hierarchical controlling ‘power pyramids’ have a number of common patterns:

The very top of the controlling pyramid is parasitical, while those supporting the system at the bottom are slaves.

Those individuals at the very top, such as those in banks and mega-corporations, may exhibit behavioural patterns related to psychopathy, as the parasitical control system resonates with psychopaths, who are known to do well in business.

Information flows from the top down on a need-to-know basis.

The select few at the top propagating orders, rules, dictates etc, to which the rest of the members in the pyramid must follow, makes this organization a consciousness and soul-destroying set up.

In contrast, as a humanitarian solution to the old, the new paradigm:

Focuses on equality
Works as a team
Thus, eliminates the parasitical predatory pyramid with its psychopaths and power trippers.
Stops orders getting followed blindly. Communication, truth and transparency are keys.
Focuses on natural law as opposed to the potentially destructive man’s law.

2. Politics

Here is a classic example of the above in terms of organizational comparisons between the old and the new paradigm.

Old paradigm: In politics the hierarchical tree is ultimately an exercise in total control. The controlling political establishment has to go to extreme lengths in order to maintain the control: Mass programming, brainwashing, surveillance, harsh law enforcement, media propaganda, etc.

New paradigm: Having no hierarchical pyramid, any organization, such as a government and their obsession with control would be redundant. The government would no longer be looked upon as an organization to be dependent upon: No need for us to have any contract.

Related reading: Our Perception of Leadership Needs to Change If We Are To Change The World

3. Scientific approaches


Old paradigm: The science, theory and application, is stuck on limitations and even delusional beliefs based on materialism: It is chained to the wishes and dictates of corporate/banker sponsors who would rather see profits than real humanitarian progress, with its dogmatic scientists from the ‘church of scientism…’

New paradigm: Goes beyond the limitations related to materialism and corporate/banker profit-based sponsorship. It involves a willingness to embrace and approach a number of subjects rejected by the old paradigm, such as for example, consciousness.

Thus, the new paradigm scientific approaches would solve many unsolved problems caused by the limitations imposed by the old, such as finding cures for disease and making use of free energy which would indeed be humanity-transforming with its innovative pioneers/inventors.

For more information, take a look at Rupert Sheldrake’s ‘10 Untruths made in Science’ with a view to how science could be set free through a turnaround.

4. Health

Old paradigm: As mentioned in Sheldrake’s ‘10 Untruths made in Science’ the medicine is mechanistic in its approach. It asserts that the body needs medical intervention rather than focussing on the body’s ability to heal naturally. Natural and holistic health based approaches are mainly ignored.

This limited approach to medicine has much to do with the Rockefeller owned and controlled corporate based medical pharmaceutical establishment with its ‘pill for every ill’ mentality. It puts profits over the genuine welfare concerns of people. It has gone to extreme lengths to suppress proven alternative natural health based cures for disease, as these approaches threaten their business.

New paradigm:
Goes beyond mechanistic medicine, as it is holistic in approach. It looks at the mind-body-spirit connection that makes up the very fabric of our being. For example, diet nutrition not only focuses on preventative measures, but is also used as curative medicine. Sound, colour and frequency healing modalities would alhave a place.

Unlike the old paradigm’s medical pharmaceutical establishment based medicine which only treats symptoms, guaranteeing repeat business, natural health approaches are capable of curing.

Related reading: Monopoly Medicine: How Big Pharma Stops Its Competitors and Monopolizes the Health Industry

5. Food

Old paradigm:
The quality of the food we eat directly reflects our health: Having the monopoly on production and sales, Big Food mega-corporations demonstrate an abject failure to promote good health through mass producing processed junk foods. Many Americans serve as testimony to this. Through their heavy long-term consumption of these processed junk foods there has been a massive rise in obesity, and much ill health.

‘Mans Law’ supersedes ‘Natural Law’: a biotech company with their genetically modified (GM) foods is a classic example where in the old paradigm ‘Mans Law’ has superseded ‘Natural Law.’ Through tinkering with God-given nature, their manmade GM foods having toxic genes and agrochemicals, threatens the health of consumers, causing diseases and allergies. Then there’s much concern over whether or not the genetic modifications will cause extinction of certain species and how this could affect ecosystems.

New paradigm:
As a contrast to the industrial monoculture, our food system is getting redefined. Increasing in numbers, people as individuals and in communities are growing their own food. Some have created their own farms. Based on organic principles, the food produced is of high quality and promotes good health through its consumption.

6. Media

Old paradigm:
The mainstream media owned and controlled by the world’s ruling elite, is a propaganda and mind control tool used to manipulate the masses into a consensus reality. In ‘Orwellian Newspeak’ fashion, the mainstream media wants complete control over the narrative: It claims to be the definitive news source, even though it has been exposed on numerous occasions for reporting blatant lies, cover-ups and deception, to favour hidden agendas. It will not accept the alternative view.

New paradigm:
The alternative (independent) media continues to redefine journalism: In recent times, many of us have seen how the ruling elite’s mainstream media have tried to blackout the alternative media with false accusations of ‘fake news.’

Real journalism, unbiased reporting, truths, transparency, and enlightenment are the future: That future is in the alternative media. Viva alternative media!

Related reading: Why Alternative Media is the New Mainstream


7. The paradigm shift

Old paradigm:
Heavy bias towards coming from the head, particularly left-brain intellectualism, often devoid of true morality.

New paradigm: Takes the more holistic approach; more involved in thinking, feeling, responding, and acting from the heart, doing what is honest, right, fair and just.

From the heart-based perspective, besides getting active practically, seeing how we could be involved in the creation of the new paradigm, to make a difference, we also need to focus on where we are consciously at with our thoughts, feelings, emotionns and how we perceive our reality, as our inner world reflects the outer world.

In other words, consciousness is the key to world change.

To conclude:

Some may dismiss the idea of world transformation, seeing it as nothing more than a pipe-dream. But world transformation through the new paradigm is not an option for humanity any longer — it is an ultimatum. To be blunt, it’s a do-or-die situation. As more and more people from all over the world are waking up, let’s take the creation of the new paradigm experience one step at a time.


Paul Philips: My blogs, articles and videos and my related alternative news/natural health website NewParadigm.ws are my stand for the possibility of creating a world that makes a difference for everyone. I graduated in biomedical sciences. My website is slanted on health matters and exposes the related deceptions…

However, over the years I have come to the firm conclusion that just about every subject under the sun needs redefining using more truthful, honest and integral approaches in theory and practice, hence the name ‘New Paradigm’. From these new approaches, from the ‘imagination of ourselves,’ from our visions – a ‘new era’ in humanity can result!


Published on Apr 7, 2017

Rupert discusses the first two steps in recognising one’s true nature, and then discusses the last and never-ending stage of realigning the body and mind with our understanding.

Rupert discusses liberation.


Published on Apr 6, 2017

What is the moment calling forth in you? What kind of response is life calling forth in you? Adyashanti explores the interplay between finding an inner resource of peace within and expecting the world to conform to your ideas of peace. By becoming the manifestation of whatever change you want to see in the world, you are redefining your expectations of the world, taking responsibility for your own life, and engaging with your spirituality in a truly deep and profound way. Adyashanti invites you into the space where this vital question can be a living inquiry in your day-to-day practice.

Video Excerpted From “Being an Expression of Peace” (ID #245):
http://bit.ly/1sig5Dz

Quotes from this Video:

“We are all most powerful and most benevolent when we are actually being whatever we want to see in the world. This is our first responsibility—to be what we want the world to become, or be the way that we would like human beings to be, interact, and engage with each other.”

“If you haven’t found the inner resource of clarity or peace or love or whatever you want to see in the world, then you’ll feel more on edge. Because you won’t be coming from being the change you want to see in the world. You’ll want the world to change so that you can be at peace, so that you can feel safe, secure, and loving.”

“In many respects, finding the right question is more important than an answer. If we think of answers in the sense of something that we are going to receive, that has some sort of final stamp of authority, that we can hold onto for the rest of our lives—that’s to misunderstand something very important about life, which is that life is a movement.”

“We human beings have the tendency to want to hold onto almost everything. If we get a revelatory experience, we tend to want to hold onto that and concretize it into a new system of thought or description of explanation. And as we are doing that, the flow of our lives is continuing on, and the next moment may call for a slightly different response.”

“To really be present for what life is calling forth in each of us is extremely important. Most people that are engaged in one form of spirituality or another, at least at a deep or inner level, part of what they’re valuing is peace, love, and clarity—and often there is a desire to see life as more whole or complete, and to experience your whole being in a clear and more complete way.”

“If we are engaged in a spiritual orientation, that comes with a kind of responsibility. The responsibility is: to be able to find within ourselves what we want to find or would desire to find in the world around us. Because if we can’t find it in ourselves, then we don’t have a whole lot of right demanding that the world conform to the way we want it to be.”

“Part of spirituality is taking that responsibility so that you become the manifestation of whatever change you want to see—you become it in your attitude, in the way you feel, in the way you move in the world, in the actions that you decide to take. This is really the heart of the spiritual life.”

“It’s so important that our spiritual life doesn’t become overly self-centered. It’s one of the dangers of a lot of inner work—that we can become so involved with our self that we are not really breathing out, we’re not engaged with our own lives and with our own existence, in a way that’s really fulfilling.”

“Our lives are the greatest gift we are ever going to give to the world.”

Published on Apr 5, 2017

Also see https://batgap.com/culadasa-john-yates/

Culadasa (John Yates, Ph.D.) is the director of Dharma Treasure Buddhist Sangha in Tucson, Arizona and author of The Mind Illuminated: A Complete Meditation Guide Integrating Buddhist Wisdom and Brain Science for Greater Mindfulness. A meditation master with over four decades of experience in the Tibetan and Theravadin Buddhist traditions, Culadasa also taught physiology and neuroscience for many years. He combines the original teachings of the Buddha with an emerging, scientific understanding of the mind to give students a rich and rare opportunity for rapid progress and profound insight.

Death is not waiting for us at the end of a long road. Death is always with us, in the marrow of every passing moment. She is the secret teacher hiding in plain sight, helping us to discover what matters most.

Life and death are a package deal. They cannot be pulled apart and we cannot truly live unless we are aware of death. The Five Invitations is an exhilarating meditation on the meaning of life and how maintaining an ever-present consciousness of death can bring us closer to our truest selves. As a renowned teacher of compassionate caregiving and the cofounder of the Zen Hospice Project, Frank Ostaseski has sat on the precipice of death with more than a thousand people. In The Five Invitations, he distills the lessons gleaned over the course of his career, offering an evocative and stirring guide that points to a radical path to transformation.

The Five Invitations:
1. Don’t Wait.

When people are dying, it is easy for them to recognize that every minute, every breath counts. But the truth is, death is always with us. Everything is constantly changing. Nothing is permanent.

This idea can both frighten and inspire us. Yet, embracing the truth of life’s precariousness helps us to appreciate its preciousness. We stop wasting our lives on meaningless activities. We learn to not hold our opinions, our desires, and even our own identities so tightly. Instead of pinning our hopes on a better future, we focus on the present and being grateful for what we have in front of us right now. We say, “I love you” more often. We become kinder, more compassionate and more forgiving.

2. Welcome Everything; Push Away Nothing

In welcoming everything, we don’t have to like what’s arising or necessarily agree with it, but we need to be willing to meet it, to learn from it. The word welcome confronts us; it asks us to temporarily suspend our usual rush to judgment and to be open, to what is showing up at our front door. To receive it in the spirit of hospitality.

A friend of mine was once invited for dinner at the home of a renowned psychiatrist named Sidney. Sidney was a man of unusual intelligence, insight, and grace. However, in the few years prior to this dinner, his Alzheimer’s disease had taken a toll on his short-term memory and ability to recognize faces.

When my friend arrived, she rang the doorbell, and Sidney opened the door. At first, he had a look of confusion. He quickly recovered and said, “I’m sorry. I have trouble remembering faces these days. But I do know that our home always has been a place where guests are welcome. If you are here on my doorstep, then it is my job to welcome you. Please come in.”

At the deepest level, this invitation is asking us to cultivate a kind of fearless receptivity.

3. Bring Your Whole Self to the Experience

We all like to look good. We long to be seen as capable, strong, intelligent, sensitive, spiritual, or at least well-adjusted. Few of us want to be known for our helplessness, fear, anger, or ignorance.

Yet more than once I have found an “undesirable” aspect of myself—one about which I previously had felt ashamed—to be the very quality that allowed me to meet another person’s suffering with compassion instead of fear or pity. It is not only our expertise, but exploration of our own suffering that enables us to build an empathetic bridge and be of real assistance to others.

To be whole, we need to include and connect all parts of ourselves. Wholeness does not mean perfection. It means no part left out.

4. Find a Place of Rest in the Middle of Things

We often think of rest as something that will come to us when everything else in our lives is complete: At the end of the day, when we take a bath; once we go on holiday or get through all our to-do lists. We imagine that we can only find rest by changing our circumstances.

There is a Zen story about a monk who is vigorously sweeping the temple grounds. Another monk walks by and snips, “Too busy.”

The first monk replies, “You should know there is one who is not too busy.”

The moral of the story is that while the sweeping monk may have outwardly appeared to the casual observer as “too busy,” actively performing his daily monastic duties, inwardly he was not busy. He could recognize the quietness of his state of mind, the part of himself that was at rest in the middle of things.

5. Cultivate “Don’t Know” Mind

This describes a mind that’s open and receptive. It is not limited by agendas, roles, and expectations. It is free to discover. When we are filled with knowing, when our mind is made up, it narrows our vision and limits our capacity to act. We only see what our knowing allows us to see. We don’t abandon our knowledge – it’s always there in the background should we need it – but we let go of fixed ideas. We let go of control.

These Five Invitations show us how to wake up fully to our lives. They can be understood as best practices for anyone coping with loss or navigating any sort of transition or crisis; they guide us toward appreciating life’s preciousness. Awareness of death can be a valuable companion on the road to living well, forging a rich and meaningful life, and letting go of regret. The Five Invitations is a powerful and inspiring exploration of the essential wisdom dying has to impart to all of us.


Frank Ostaseski is a Buddhist teacher and leader in contemplative end-of-life care. In 1987, he co-founded of the Zen Hospice Project and later created the Metta Institute to train professionals in compassionate, mindfulness-based care. He has lectured at Harvard Medical School, the Mayo Clinic, Wisdom.2.0 and teaches at major spiritual centers around the globe. His work has been featured on the Bill Moyers PBS series On Our Own Terms, The Oprah Winfrey Show, and in numerous print publications. In 2001, he was honored by the Dalai Lama for his compassionate service to the dying and their families. He is the author of The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach Us About Living Fully. More info: http://www.fiveinvitations.com

Find a Place of Rest – Frank Ostaseski, Founder, Metta Institute, author The Five Invitations


Published on Apr 4, 2017

https://www.scienceandnonduality.com/

With Julia Mossbridge, Donald Hoffman, Edward Frenkel, Anthony Aguirre, Federico Faggin; facilitated by Deepak Chopra.

Five different scientists with varying views of consciousness or mind. This panel will be a conversation between these different views to understand their contributions, and to see how they understand each other, and how they relate to other theories of consciousness. The point is to have a genuine deep dialogue between scientific theories of consciousness, to find commonalities, and the meaning of the differences. We will explore whether scientific theories have a consensus about anything relating to consciousness, like an operating definition of consciousness. This panel will be facilitated with an eye from the nondual view of consciousness, to ask questions and address issues in the study of consciousness that can help in looking deeper into the assumptions and conclusions of each theory.

Written by internationally revered clairvoyant counselor and educator Ellen Tadd, The Infinite View is a spiritual classic in the making.

People often lean towards either trusting their gut or relying on their analytical mind, but Tadd urges readers to consider a new approach that allows both emotions and the intellect to be guided by wisdom. Through describing how the Spirit, soul, and personality are integrated, she guides readers in deepening and expanding their perceptions to discover practical solutions to everyday challenges.

According to Tadd, Spirit is the God Force that animates and empowers us and suffuses everyone and everything. But while Spirit is conscious and communicative, we haven’t been taught to look for or listen to it. In fact, most of us have been conditioned not to look or listen. When we choopse to attune our conscious mind with Spirit, we find ourselves able to engage life with greater clarity—even when it tests us through illness, death, loneliness, anxiety, or fear.

The Infinite View offers tools and insights needed to achieve this attunement. Drawing on her personal narrative, as well as the experiences of her students, Tadd helps readers transform their understanding of themselves and the world around them.

Ellen Tadd is an internationally known clairvoyant counselor and educator who has been teaching and counseling for more than forty years. She is widely respected for the integrity of her work, the accuracy of her perceptions and guidance, and the clarity and usefulness of her teaching. Tadd has lectured across the country at colleges, universities, hospitals, and community groups. Tadd is the author of two other books, The Wisdom of the Chakras and Death and Letting Go, which appeared on the Boston Globe bestseller list.

The Infinite View: A Guidebook for Life on Earth with Ellen Tadd

Published on Mar 22, 2017

Source:
https://www.spreaker.com/user/omtimes…

Aired Wednesday, 22 March 2017, 2:00 PM ET

The Infinite View: A Guidebook for Life on Earth with Ellen Tadd

Today’s Star is Ellen Tadd

When we choose to attune our conscious mind with Spirit, we find ourselves able to engage life with greater clarity, and in The Infinite View, Ellen offers tools and insights needed to achieve this attunement.

About the Guest: Ellen Tadd

Ellen Tadd is an internationally known clairvoyant counselor and educator who has been teaching and counseling for more than forty years. She is widely respected for the integrity of her work, the accuracy of her perceptions and guidance, and the clarity and usefulness of her teaching. Tadd has lectured across the country at colleges, universities, hospitals, and community groups. Tadd is the author of three books: The Wisdom of the Chakras, Death and Letting Go which made the Boston Globe bestseller list, and her latest – The Infinite View.

Website: http://ellentadd.com/

There is a very clear distinction between the awakened state of Presence and the world of the mind. When you are fully present, thoughts stop and your mind is silent. That is the test of Presence. It is the test of silence. You are utterly present with what is here and your mind is silent. It is as if silence is aware of silence. That is it. Not one word or thought arises. You are immersed in the moment of now.

Your mind might come in with observations about your spiritual progress or how awake you are, or how enlightened you are. These are just thoughts arising within the mind and probably generated by the ego. Your ego wants to be enlightened. Just say to your ego, “yes, yes darling you are the most enlightened of them all.” The ego will relax with this light-hearted acknowledgment.

Even if you say to me, “I am enlightened,” I would ask you, “Who is enlightened?” The only possible answer is “I AM,” which will immediately take you beyond the mind. It will take you beyond the world of time. It will take you beyond the concept or idea of enlightenment. It is the “I AM” Presence that is the awakened you. That is it. There is nothing beyond that. But the moment you think about it or the moment you have a view of yourself as being awake or enlightened, you are in the mind again.

No one can truly awaken unless they are clear about this distinction. Otherwise, you will think you are present or enlightened when you are not. Even worse, the ego will think it is present or enlightened. This confusion is an obstacle to your full awakening. It is very difficult to free yourself from an ‘enlightened’ ego.

To be present is your natural state. In fact the only way you can be somewhere other than in the present moment is to think your way out of here. And where will you go? You will take yourself into the past and future world of the mind. All thoughts are of the past or future and that is exactly where they will take you. You will find yourself in a world of illusion and separation.

I am not saying that thoughts should stop or the ego should be eliminated. Just be aware of thoughts as they arise and recognize them for what they are. Your thoughts have nothing to do with the present moment. Even brilliant spiritual thoughts are just thoughts. Even brilliant reflections upon your spiritual progress are just reflections within the mind. Do not allow the ego to fool you. Do not reject your thoughts, but also do not believe in them. Do not follow them. Just acknowledge the thought and gently return to Presence.

Once you relax into silence, you will deepen into Presence. And then of course, all sorts of wonderful things can arise from the silence at the center of your being – bliss, ecstasy, love, compassion, truth and wisdom can arise and flow through you.

If you are fully awake in this moment, all separation dissolves as you open into Oneness. Your sense of yourself as an individual also dissolves as you are immersed into the mystery of this moment.

You do not always have to be at this deep level of Presence. Unless you retire to a cave or an ashram, you will still participate in the world of time and use your mind many times each day. There is nothing wrong with thinking, as long as you are aware of the distinction between the awakened state of Presence and the world of the mind. This will enable you to settle more deeply and more fundamentally into the world of now.

About Leonard: Leonard Jacobson is an awakened spiritual teacher, mystic and author, who is deeply committed to helping others break through to the joyous experience of living in the NOW. For more than 35 years, Leonard has been teaching people how to become fundamentally present and arise in mastery of the mind and ego. Find more of Leonard’s work at Leonard Jacobson.com.
Source: AWAKEN
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“In the absence of the sacred, nothing is sacred. Everything is for sale.” ~ Oren R. Lyons, Faithkeeper of the Turtle clan

When writing my latest book, I was surprised how difficult I found it to write a ‘short chapter about nature and sacredness’ for a readership that would be mainly urban. Now that the indigenous movement against the completion of the Dakota Access Pipeline brought the issue to the fore, I was reminded how urgently we need to re-connect with the sacred aspect of nature, not only because we face an ecological crisis and need to stand up in vast numbers to the ever increasing destruction of natural habitat and resources driven, but also because the separation from the nature aspect of ourselves, from our earth roots and souls, is contributing extensively to the dis-connection from our own wild nature and to our mental, emotional and physical suffering and dis-enchantment.

Indigenous views on the sacred in nature

One of the most important teachings, which we have been blessed with, is that people all over the world who are still rooted in Earth-based traditions have always maintained that being embedded in nature means being close to creation, the creator and the divine – that the sacred is directly experienced through creation and can be understood through observation and communication with the spirit(s) of nature.

Whilst we, in our so-called modern world have been for millennia led to believe that the divine is somewhere ‘out there’, indigenous teachers remind us that the sacred and divine is ‘right here’. The Aboriginal teacher and artist Miriam Rose Ungunmerr-Baumann expresses this when she writes that it is easy for her to experience God when she hunts, is in the bush or is amongst trees, as her people have been so aware of nature that it is natural for her to feel close to the creator. [1] And Carlos Perez Shuma, a Peruvian shaman, echoes this from the other side of the world when he says “… because in nature there is God and God talks to us in our visions.” [2]

But not only have we been led to believe that the divine is ‘out there’, we have also been led to believe that we are separate from nature and, most importantly, that we are a superior species. Societies’ current spiritual beliefs, based on our religions, affirm human superiority instead of equality and the sacredness of all living beings. In Genesis God says “Be fruitful and increase in number; fill the earth and subdue it. Rule over the fish in the sea and the birds in the sky and over every living creature that moves on the ground.” [3]

In contrast, from an indigenous and shamanic viewpoint, everything in the web of life is not only alive and interrelated, but it is equally sacred as it derives from the same underlying (spiritual) field. The loss of this knowing has led to devastating consequences. The more we define ourselves as ‘separate’ from nature, the less we follow the intent of the spiritual dimension from which we have arisen, and the more we harm not only the manifested dimension of our Earth, which we can see in the ecological damage we have done, but also the spiritual and sacred dimension of the Earth and our own souls.

Living in the right way

Becoming aware of and letting ourselves experience the spiritual and sacred dimension, waking up to the divine in nature, leads inherently to everything being treated with respect, rather than being exploited for the gain of one species, namely our own. This doesn’t mean, however, that Earth-based cultures are sentimental about animals and plants. Animals are killed for food and plants are eaten, but understanding their inherent spirits leads to an honourable way of taking their lives.

When I was in Mongolia I was touched by how the nomadic herders, whose livelihood was rearing and slaughtering animals, honoured their spirits. You could find animal skulls everywhere being used to house the spirits of the slaughtered animals. Societies that are still Earth-based will also thank the animal spirits for giving their earthly body for human nourishment and often hold ceremonies in honour of them. When I worked with shamans in South America, no food was consumed without offerings to the spirits and all leftover food was given away rather than binned. When they cut plants for healing or collected wood for a ceremony, they always left an offering in return and thanked the trees and the plants. In most traditions, including the North American, Inuit and Siberian, all edible parts of the animal are eaten, spirit guides are asked to lead the hunters to the animal spirit to thank it, and feathers, skins and furs are worn in ceremony. The contrast to our cruel factory farming and slaughtering of about 56 billion animals per year worldwide couldn’t be stronger.

Once we reconnect to the divine in nature and begin to feel it, we will also appreciate the shamanic notion that nature teaches us right from wrong and that sustainability is directly connected to this. Eli Gatoga, a Cherokee chief, expressed this when he said, “The Indian made an effort to know of spiritual things from his own observations of nature, because all truth can be found in Nature”. [4] Slava Cheltuev, a shaman from the Dyayat Kypchak clan of Russia’s Altai mountains, says: “Our earth is sacred… living on the earth, each person must respect their place. We must respect it, protect it and it will give us life, it will give us health” [5], whilst Oren R. Lyons, university professor, author of many books and Faithkeeper of the Turtle Clan, pulls it together stringently: “In the absence of the sacred, nothing is sacred. Everything is for sale.” [6]

It is the sacred in nature that we need to re-experience because the moment we understand the sacredness, we also realize that the right way to live is in balance and harmony with the natural laws that are inherent in the underlying field of the divine mother. This means respecting the preciousness of all life, giving something back whenever we take something, honouring the spirits within nature, contributing positively to the underlying energetic spiritual field and striving to live in a way that sustains all creation and helps it to thrive.

Our earth souls are starving

But it is not only the earth and the many life forms we harm with our ‘forgetting about the sacredness’ of all life. Within this cosmology of the sacred inter-connectedness of all life, it becomes obvious that the harm we do to nature within the web we also do to ourselves, to our body/mind and to our souls.

If we look at human development, we realize that we are indeed beings of both nature and culture, and that our increasing neglect of the nature dimension of ourselves causes soul starvation and mental/emotional problems. My own observations as a psychologist, therapist and shamanic practitioner over many years have shown me how much disenchantment, emotional and mental imbalance and rootlessness modern people experience. This is supported by profound research, which also shows us the healing power of nature on the psyche. Nature symbolism is, for instance, dominant in healing experiences and people of all age-groups feel emotionally more stable, more peaceful, more alive, more compassionate and re- enchanted after spending time in nature.

Nature also shows us alternatives to our consumer-orientated and technology-poisoned way of life.

Bill Plotkin, a shamanic eco-psychologist who facilitates long, intensive wilderness camps, observes that “… healthy human development requires a constant balancing of the influences and demands of both nature and culture… By suppressing the nature dimension of human development… industrial growth society engenders an immature citizenry unable to imagine a life beyond consumerism and soul-suppressing jobs.” [7]

And George Monbiot, the Guardian columnist and author of ‘Feral: Rewilding the Land, the Sea, and Human Life’ remarks: “It is no longer rare to meet adults who have never swum except in a swimming pool, never slept except in a building, never run a mile or climbed a mountain, never been stung by a bee or a wasp… We are separated from the world by a layer of glass…. in our temperature-controlled enclosures, all can be reduced to abstractions.” [8]

Unfortunately our longing for nature is increasingly pushed into the subconscious. Only when we are encouraged to dig a bit deeper do we realize that our mind still associates being powerful and wild, being at home, feeling safe, peaceful and healthy, with being in nature. In my practice I have never experienced anybody who, when asked to find their place of power, sanctuary, peace or healing visualized a crowded city, their place of work, a shopping mall, a club or any other place in our urban world. People of all ages and social backgrounds visualize a place in nature.

The connection to nature is not only important for our mental and emotional wellbeing but also for re-experiencing the ‘sacred wild’ within ourselves. As we begin to reconnect consciously with nature, we recognize that our Earth soul is indeed wild and needs to be allowed to tune into where it lives, namely the vast and beautiful realms of nature, in order to be nourished and reflect itself back to us. Every time we connect with nature in a sacred way, we reinforce the sacred within us, nurture our soul and give ourselves a chance to experience ‘being home’.

So, why am I writing about this? Well, mainly to stress that all of us, who seriously want to become whole and make a difference, need to make time to be in nature. We need to focus on learning from nature, be inspired by it, revitalize and re-energize our natural powers, quest for vision, tune into the seasons and use the many ways and means open to us, from wilderness camps to vision quests, from fire ceremonies to connecting with the underlying spirit essences of trees, plants mountains, rocks, water, star and planets. Above all we need to remember, in our urban technological world and life styles, that re-experiencing the divine in nature – and within ourselves – is necessity if we want to become whole and agents of change.

References:

Ungunmerr-Bauman, M.R. (2007) Dadiiri Inenr Deep Listening and Quiet Awareness. http://nextwave.org.au/wp-content/uploads/Dadirri-Inner-Deep-Listening-M-R-Ungunmerr-Bauman-Refl.pdf
Narby, J. (2003) The Cosmic Serpent, DNA and the Origin of Knowledge. New York: Penguin Putnam Inc. p.2
Genesis, 1, page 28
Gatoga, E. (1914-1983) http://www.freepressjournal.in/the-call-of-nature
http://ourworld.unu.edu/en/land-has-breath-respecting-nature-in-altai
Lyons, O. http://www.indigenouspeople.net/orenlyon.htm p.1
Plotkin, B. (2008) Nature and the Human Soul. Cultivating Wholeness and Community in a Fragmented World. Novato, California: New World Library p. 6
http://www.monbiot.com/2017/03/02/screened-out

Also by Christa Mackinnon:

The Return of the Feminine Principle: A Question of ‘Thriving Life’ or ‘Destructive Death’
What About the Feminine? How Patriarchal Value Systems Affect Consciousness

About the author:
Christa Mackinnon holds a Master of Science in psychology and is a family counselor, clinical hypnotherapist and shamanic teacher. She has worked as a psychologist, therapist, trainer, lecturer and trauma consultant internationally for 25 years, and is an honorary teaching fellow at the University of Exeter in the UK.

Christa sees her current work as ‘Bridging the Worlds’ between the ancient shamanic and the contemporary therapeutic. Based on her ground-breaking book on the subject matter, she facilitates Continuing Professional Development (CPD) courses for professionals, speaks at conferences, and lectures widely. She also facilitates courses and retreats for women and is currently in the process of writing a new book, which will be about the feminine.

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