Latest Entries »

Consciousness vs Matter – A talk by Sri Sri Ravi Shankar

Sri Sri Ravi Shankar founded The Art of Living as an international, non-profit, educational and humanitarian organization in 1982. Its educational and self-development programs offer powerful tools to eliminate stress and foster a sense of well-being through powerful breathing techniques such as Sudarshan Kriya and Yoga. Appealing not only to a specific population, these practices have proven effective globally at all levels of society.

Advertisements

Gurudev Sri Sri Ravi Shankar reveals the knowledge of the collective consciousness. He further talks about how the energy and vibrations that exist in ashrams and temples impact us differently from other places.

Sri Sri Ravi Shankar founded The Art of Living as an international, non-profit, educational and humanitarian organization in 1982. Its educational and self-development programs offer powerful tools to eliminate stress and foster a sense of well-being through powerful breathing techniques such as Sudarshan Kriya and Yoga. Appealing not only to a specific population, these practices have proven effective globally at all levels of society.

Many of you may be feeling the energetic shift that has been happening on the planet that is affecting humanity on a large scale. Many people talk about the awakening of humanity into greater consciousness. Some describe this as a “spiritual awakening.” What this means is being mindful and aware about the life we are creating. It’s about giving greater meaning to things and knowing that our actions affect others and create our future.

Part of this awakening of consciousness includes the awakening of the divine feminine (and the divine masculine too). I’d like to highlight the awakening of the divine feminine, because for so long the feminine has been suppressed in all of existence on this Earth, and in some cultures it still is today.

If you look at the common religions of the world today, there has been no place for women other than as nuns or as mother figures of the great men who were born to do great things. Women have rarely held leadership positions, and even today women do much less so compared to men. But this is changing.

Feminine doesn’t only have to do with females, nor does masculine only with males. Within each one of us lives feminine and masculine. Certain traits and ways of being can be categorized as masculine versus feminine. Focus, for example is masculine, while multitasking is feminine, and these are traits that serve both men and women, though typically women embody more feminine traits and men more masculine.

Long ago existed matriarchal societies where women led and made much of the decisions. During the most recent millennia, our society has been driven by males with very masculine force. The use of war and destruction to create was, and still is, a big problem that doesn’t allow for harmony and peace to prevail on the planet. There is great strength in gentleness too, but the ideas of compassion and kindness seem foreign to most people when it comes to business and politics.

There has been so much doing and busyness (both masculine approaches) to creating the modern day world we see today, which was built on top of Nature instead of in harmony with her. Many have forgotten their connection with the Earth and have forgotten how to simply be. The focus on money as the end result, instead of more love, has led to much dis-ease and suffering on the planet.

Subconscious to many women, there is an undercurrent of anger at the masculine, for what has happened on the planet over the last thousands of years, which took the form of feminism. From genocide to the pornography industry driving human trafficking, to the lack of women’s rights, slavery, war, the destruction of Nature, the list goes on. It’s more challenging for women to do such things compared to men because we women are naturally more in touch with our feminine side and the Earth. However, even for us, much of our feminine has been dormant because there has been no space for it during these overly masculine times.

Thankfully, the awakening of the feminine divine is happening. It’s about awakening even more compassion, softness, gentleness, surrender, flowing, creativity, beingness, empathy, vulnerability, understanding, patience, beauty, thoughtfulness and nurturing. It’s about connecting back to the Earth, each other and all beings and things, healing our wounds, forgiving what has happened while making conscious choices about how we wish to create our future–together.

It’s about honoring and being in devotion to both the divine feminine and the divine masculine in its balanced, healthy, complementary forms. Men and the masculine are equally as important as women and the feminine for the evolution and continuation of our planet. When this happens, balance blossoms–flow with direction, discipline with compassion, unconditional love, presence with multitasking, strength with gentleness, graceful will, etc.

Source: Nikki Starr Noce, M.D.

Published on Apr 18, 2018

Stephen Snyder ‘The Transformative and The Transcendent’ Interview by Iain McNay
Stephen is the co-author of ‘Practicing the Jhanas: Traditional Concentration Meditation as Presented by the Venerable PA Auk Sayadaw.’ 

 He has been a Buddhist practitioner for over 40 years. In the 70’s he read ‘Three Pillars Of Zen’ which started him on his path of meditation and then a few years later he had a significant awakening experience which showed him the nature of reality. He discovered the Jhana path of meditation and found he strongly connected with that. 

He now works with Tina Rasmussen teaching meditation and is also a practicing lawyer. He has found that it is really important to work on the Transformative and The Transcendent and talks in detail about this in the interview. http://www.awakeningdharma.com


What would it be like to not be attached to your ideas, beliefs, and opinions? Without dismissing your beliefs, you can take a step back, and not be so limited and restricted by them. Adyashanti looks afresh at attachment, the suffering it creates, and offers up an open stance of being.

Quotes from this Video:

“We all know that in almost every form of spirituality, attachment is seen as an essential difficulty. It’s one of the root causes of not only suffering for our self, but also the way we project the suffering out into the world.”

“We all know what it’s like to be attached to our own ideas, our own opinions, our point of view. To be attached doesn’t mean to simply have a point of view. You can have a point of view, you can have a belief, you can have an opinion–without being attached to it. It’s pretty rare, but it’s possible.”


Anne Baring, born 1931. MA Oxon. Jungian analyst. Author and co-author of 7 books. The ground of all her work is a deep interest in history and the spiritual, mythological, shamanic and artistic traditions of different cultures. Her website is devoted to the affirmation of a new vision of reality and the challenges facing us at this crucial time of choice. It includes her many talks, lectures and seminars as well as interviews and talks on YouTube.

Books:

The Dream of the Cosmos
The Myth of the Goddess: Evolution of an Image
The Divine Feminine: Exploring The Feminine Face of God Around The World
The Mystic Vision: Daily Encounters with the Divine
Soul Power: An Agenda for a Conscious Humanity

Posted on April 14, 2018

Donna Quesada: You’ve written so extensively about the subject of awakening…what led you to this aspect of your work?

Dr. Steve Taylor: For me, personally, I think I was always a person that showed natural wakefulness…from the age of 16 or 17, I was aware of what I would now call “spiritual experiences.” But at the time, I didn’t understand them.

DONNA: So, you had a natural experience that wasn’t inspired by any kind of practice at all? You were a teenager?

STEVE: That’s right. I was 16. The thing that I really liked to do as a teenager, was wander around in nature…wander around the parks looking at the sky…looking at the trees. I’d just feel a sense of quietness and a sense of connection to nature…the natural scenery around me…feel a sense of wholeness and kind of like an elation, a kind of euphoria. But I didn’t understand it at the time. I used to write poetry to try and describe some of these experiences, but my background wasn’t a spiritual background. I didn’t have a religious background or a spiritual background. So, at the time, I didn’t understand these experiences. I tried to explain it to people and they thought I was crazy. So, after a while, I thought it was crazy as well. I thought there was something wrong with me. For a long time, I was confused and I couldn’t accept myself for a long time. It was only accidentally, when I was 21 or 22 years old, that I picked up a book about Mysticism. I was drawn to it in a book shop. And when I read the book about mysticism, I suddenly recognized my own experiences. I thought, wow, this is what’s happened to me. So, I suddenly had a framework or context to make sense of my experiences, which was very, very helpful.

DONNA: Did that lead to a more formal practice or a search for a teacher, perhaps?

STEVE: Yeah, because even though at that point, I finally understood myself…I finally accepted myself…there were still some difficulties…some challenges…the kind of life-style I was living. At that time, I was a musician. So, the kind of life-style I was living, wasn’t conducive to spirituality. Lots of late nights. Playing gigs. Lots of drinking and smoking and that kind of thing. It took me a few years to learn to meditate on a daily basis. So, by the end of my 20’s I was meditating on a daily basis. And I began to find a stability and I began to integrate my spirituality into my daily life. And I changed my life to fit my spirituality. I became a vegetarian, stopped smoking, stopped drinking, that kind of thing. So, it took me a while to find a stable base and meditation was definitely a part of it.

DONNA: So, it’s funny…you were a musician…and drinking and smoking and all of that. On the other hand, you were that third group…that has a natural, deep feeling about life. And the sense that there is something more…and the tendency to ask questions and to experience things on a deeper level. It reminds me of something my own teacher said—David and I have the same teacher—and he was talking about the hippies. And he was saying that people tend to think of them as sort of rebels and outcasts and all of that, but the reality is, they are actually closer to enlightenment than they are given credit for. The mainstream is off. The way we are doing things is somehow under the thumb of propaganda. And government can be oppressive and they are sensitive to all these things. They’re almost ahead of their time in their awareness of things that just don’t feel right. They want a new spirituality…they want a new way of living. They’re asking questions that the mainstream isn’t asking.

STEVE: I think that’s very true. I think the hippies were a very significant social movement. I wrote a book called The Fall, where I said that most of the human race’s problems in history have been due to our intensified sense of ego and sense of self. So, we have a sense of separateness to nature which leads us to exploit nature. We have a sense of separateness to our own bodies which leads to sexual repression…towards hostility to sexual desire. I think the hippies, to explain it in more detail…about 300 years ago, there was a social movement, a collective shift in consciousness which began in the 18th Century. The second half of the 18th Century. I call that the “Trans-Fall” movement. It’s when human beings began to move beyond separateness…beyond the super intense sense of ego. So, there was a new sense of compassion. A new sense of egalitarianism and democracy and so on. And that has continued since then and I think the hippie movement was a significant part of that. It was a time when men became more feminine. It was a time for new openness to the body and sexuality. And it was a time when people identified with indigenous cultures. It was a time when people felt a connection to nature and a desire to explore transcendent states of consciousness. So, in some ways, I think it was an expression of evolution, this evolutionary movement which I spoke about earlier. This movement beyond separateness and to a deeper state of consciousness.

DONNA: Seems like we are talking about oneness and unity. That is the common thread that runs through…I’ll go ahead and use the ‘E’ word. The enlightenment traditions of the world…whether we are coming from a Taoist platform or a Hindu platform, or a Buddhist platform…it seems like this thread of continuity has to do with overcoming our sense of separateness. And nature, from that point of view, can be a conduit to waking up because it can inspire the sense of awe…I’m a part of something bigger than me.

STEVE: Oh, definitely. Funny enough, in my research as a psychologist I’ve done quite a bit of research on awakening experiences which are temporary experiences of transcendence. They usually fade away after a few minutes or a few hours. They are just a temporary glimpse of wakefulness. And nature is one of the biggest triggers of awakening experiences. So often when people are swimming in the ocean, or swimming in a lake, or walking in the mountains…or even, just lying in the park on a sunny day…that’s when awakening experiences often occur, due to the effect of contact with nature. I think nature has a quality of stillness. It enables us to calm down. Our minds begin to slow down. Our minds empty and some space opens up inside us. A bit of space opens up between our thoughts, and we somehow get in touch with deeper levels of our own being. We transcend separateness.

DONNA: Do you think art can do that, as well? When you were just describing that, at this moment, I was thinking about the word sublime. You know the German philosopher, Kant, talked about the sublime…when we are confronted with something that words cannot describe. And I feel like that experience in nature is not unlike the experience we have with art. And also, like a spiritual experience.

STEVE: Yeah. In fact, that was another significant trigger of Awakening experiences. Witnessing a crazy performance…a lot of people talked about going to the theatre to see a dance performance…listening to music…and they would experience this more expansive state of consciousness. Yes, I think in the same way, art can give way to transcendence. It can open up our minds. It can open up space inside us. And it can remind us, or connect us to a higher reality.

DONNA: So, when I was preparing for this interview, I was reading some of your work where you talk about dogs. As an animal lover myself, I want to switch gears just a little bit and take advantage of your time and ask you about that…because having two dogs myself, I was relating very much to the stories you were telling. You were talking about empathy. And how we are not the only ones with this quality of empathy. When we can almost predict what the other will do or sense what the other is thinking. You were saying how dogs know when their owners are coming home…and that they did some tests…and the dogs would go to the window as soon as the owner was on their way home…and they repeated the tests and they were able to demonstrate that the dogs did have an overwhelming sensitivity and connection to their owners. So, this makes me wonder if humans are the only ones. And I don’t think we are…that have this quality of connection that we have been talking about. Would you be able to comment on that?

STEVE: Well, I think in some sense, all living beings are inter-connected. We share the same fundamental consciousness. You know, that’s what compassion is. If I feel compassionate towards someone’s suffering, I am sensing their own inner being. I am sharing…that’s what empathy is. When we perform acts of kindness…that’s triggered by our shared sense of being. And that works on kind of a psychic level, too. If I think about a person and they call me in the next second. Or, if I have a dream and I meet that person in my dream the next day…that works through the inter-connectedness between us. We share the same collective mind. That enables us to be telepathic.

The problem with human beings is because of our egos. These strong and separate sense of egos. We kind of isolate ourselves from the ocean of being. We become like separate islands within the ocean and we sometime lose the ability to empathize with one another and the ability to sense other people’s suffering…and people’s intentions or thoughts. But animals…because they don’t have the sense of ego that we have, they’re actually more connected to us and to each other, which is why it has been shown many times, that dogs have this psychic connection with their owners.

DONNA: Yes, Well, I’ve experienced it. And so, I took an interest in that. It’s not only sensing when their owners are coming home…although, how could we know that?…we are not home to watch their behavior. But certainly, being in car rides you can tell that when we turn in certain directions that are different than the usual route, they sense something different has happened. They are somehow in tune in a different way than we are.

STEVE: Yes, I think so. They share this unity of being which we have sometimes, but we often lose it because of our ego centeredness. And cats, I have a cat and a couple of years ago my wife’s father died and when my mother in law…my wife’s mother came to stay with us…the cat…it was so obvious that she was responding to my mother in law’s grief. She would sit near her. She was comforting her. I think it happens a lot that cats have this, and probably dogs too, of this sense of when people are in need. People need comfort when they are bereaved or depressed. They sense it and offer their comfort.

DONNA: Interesting. Yes. Speaking of bereavement and things of this nature, do you think there is such a thing as the dark night of the soul? Is suffering necessary for the process of awakening?

STEVE: It can be, yeah. I’ve found in my research and in my own experience, too, that when spiritual awakenings happen suddenly and dramatically…it’s often preceded by intense suffering. I’ve done research with a lot of people who were diagnosed with cancer and told that they only had a few months or maybe a year to live. I’ve done research with people that were severely disabled…people who were addicts, who lost everything do to addiction…many people who were bereaved…and it definitely seems that the intense loss and suffering they went through was the trigger of their spiritual awakening. What seems to happen is the normal ego breaks down in the face of so much suffering. Just like a building in an earthquake. It just collapses. But when the normal ego collapses in some people, there seems to be a kind of latent higher self that is waiting to be born…and that new self-arises inside of them and becomes their normal self.

DONNA: Almost like we are supposed to awaken but we live in a state of distraction or darkness or overcome by life’s day to day necessities. And it takes some strong event to shake us out of that. Out of the normal life’s pattern, so to speak.

STEVE: Yeah, exactly, yeah. It’s a bit like on a communal level, you can have a group of people that live in a town…they all live in their different houses and they don’t really interact. Sometime it takes a crisis…if there is a crisis in a community…like, maybe a fire, an earthquake, maybe just a burglary, a spate of burglaries in the town. It brings people together, it shifts the community to a higher level. People begin to interact. They communicate a lot more. They act altruistically towards each other. The whole community somehow deepens and becomes more connected.

DONNA: Yes, yes. I’ll draw on your background in psychology a little bit more on this because I find it so fascinating. This observation that even when people do have an awakening experience or are pursuing an awakened life in formal practice or on their own…it still doesn’t equate with sanity. For example, being in a human body and living a human life is somehow challenging. And I’ve often seen that just because people have a spiritual life or are living a spiritual lifestyle, they still fall prey to life’s challenges. They still suffer from the depression or anxiety that they always did suffer from and it doesn’t just magically disappear the way we would expect. Oh, this person is awakened or this person is a spiritual teacher…everything is perfect for this person…they’ve got it all figured out. But not necessarily.

Continued in Part II…
Source: AWAKEN

Published on Apr 13, 2018

In this discussion, Rupert elaborates on why it is not possible for an experience to eclipse awareness.

In an interview with conscioustv nonduality teacher Rupert Spira explains what steps he took in order to realize his true nature / enlightenment. His realization was that there is absolutely nothing that he can do; already and all the time he is/was consciousness or awareness that is looking at itself.


Rupert Spira shares his views and experiences related to
Non-duality, Ceramics, Meditation, Advaita, Vedanta, Consciousness and Awareness.

‘The discovery that peace, happiness and love are ever-present within our own Being, and completely available at every moment of experience, under all conditions, is the most important discovery that anyone can make.’

‘To believe that I, Awareness, share the limits and the destiny of the mind and body is like believing that the screen shares the limits and destiny of a character in a movie.’

Rupert Spira’s Homepage:

https://goo.gl/m0jpOk

Published on Apr 13, 2018

After the sudden ending of an intimate relationship Alberto suffered greatly with painful thoughts and feelings. He saw no way out. This pushed him onto a spiritual path. He discovered the “Gnostic Movement” and dived headlong into this knowledge. 

After a time when he had found a new relationship he and his partner sold their house, resigned from their jobs, and left Italy to move to South America where the School was based. They devoting their lives to the deepening of their understanding of their inner nature and worked for the good of the School. They loved it. 

After a time though they discovered some inconsistency between the School’s doctrine and the leaders behaviour. Eventually they left and lost all their friends at the school as nobody would greet them anymore. They were treated like strangers and had to rebuild their lives. 

What Alberto brought out with him from the School was the teaching of “Self Remembering”. When we do not remember ourselves we are asleep, we are not there. The only “real Life” we have during our day is what we do when awake; what is done from a state of Presence. Normally this is about 1%. We can live a whole day and perform most tasks that are required of us without being present or remembering our real selves.

Alberto also developed the “Conscious Learning course” for University students of all Faculties. http://www.spaziosereno.com

 

A conversation exploring death. discussion about not confusing a blank state of mind with the presence of Awareness.

A conversation exploring death.

Published on Apr 9, 2018

Eckhart Tolle Talks – Life Isn’t As Serious As The Mind Makes It Out To Be.
Eckhart Tolle (/ˈɛkɑːrt ˈtɒlə/ EK-art TOL-ə; German pronunciation: [ˈɛkhaʁt ˈtɔlə], born Ulrich Leonard Tölle on February 16, 1948) is a German-born resident of Canada best known as the author of The Power of Now and A New Earth: Awakening to your Life’s Purpose. In 2008, a New York Times writer called Tolle “the most popular spiritual author in the United States”. 

In 2011, he was listed by Watkins Review as the most spiritually influential person in the world. Tolle is not identified with any particular religion, but he has been influenced by a wide range of spiritual works.

Published on Apr 10, 2018

Francis Lucille guides the audience in a meditation on the yes-saying path of “holy laziness.” He reminds us that this moment, and always, everything is happening on its own. Our decisions are in fact cosmic events, no different than the rain or the snow or the hurricane. They just happen. Nobody owns them. The mind pretends to own them, to be the thinker of the thought, the decider of the decision, but it’s like a clown taking the bow after the ballerina’s performance, to claim the applause.

Terry Patten is a philosopher, teacher, activist, consultant, social entrepreneur, and author. Over the last fifteen years he has devoted his efforts to the evolution of consciousness by facing, examining, and healing our global crisis through the marriage of spirit and activism. 

He co-wrote the book “Integral Life Practice” with Ken Wilber and a core team at the Integral Institute. As a teacher and consultant, he has worked on four continents, led a team at the HeartMath Institute that developed their first heart rate variability monitor, and is the founder of the “Beyond Awakening” teleseminar series. 

As a community builder, he founded Bay Area Integral. As a social entrepreneur, he founded Tools For Exploration, a consciousness technologies company, and currently, he’s involved in restorative redwood forestry and fossil-fuel alternatives. His new book “ATerry Patten is a philosopher, teacher, activist, consultant, social entrepreneur, and author. Over the last fifteen years he has devoted his efforts to the evolution of consciousness by facing, examining, and healing our global crisis through the marriage of spirit and activism. He co-wrote the book “Integral Life Practice” with Ken Wilber and a core team at the Integral Institute. As a teacher and consultant, he has worked on four continents, led a team at the HeartMath Institute that developed their first heart rate variability monitor, and is the founder of the “Beyond Awakening” teleseminar series. As a community builder, he founded Bay Area Integral. As a social entrepreneur, he founded Tools For Exploration, a consciousness technologies company, and currently, he’s involved in restorative redwood forestry and fossil-fuel alternatives. His new book “A New Republic of the Heart: An Ethos for Revolutionaries–A Guide to Inner Work for Holistic Change” was released by North Atlantic Books on March 6th, 2018. Terry is also co-author of Integral Life Practice: A 21st-Century Blueprint for Physical Health, Emotional Balance, Mental Clarity, and Spiritual Awakening.

Website: https://www.terrypatten.com/

 New Republic of the Heart: An Ethos for Revolutionaries–A Guide to Inner Work for Holistic Change” was released by North Atlantic Books on March 6th, 2018. Terry is also co-author of Integral Life Practice: A 21st-Century Blueprint for Physical Health, Emotional Balance, Mental Clarity, and Spiritual Awakening.

Website: https://www.terrypatten.com/

Published on Apr 8, 2018

In this video, Eckhart Tolle tells what I AM really means!

Published on Apr 7, 2018

Michael James ‘The Real Behind All Appearances’ Interview by Iain McNay
Author of ‘Happiness and The Art Of Being – An Introduction to the philosophy and practice of the spiritual teachings of Bhagavan Sri Ramana.’ Michael travelled overland to India when he was 19 to help find some deeper meaning to his life. He discovered the book ‘Who Am I’ by Ramana Maharashi and went to Tiruvannamallai where Ramana had lived to find out more about him. There he connected with Sri Sadhu Om who had been a student of Ramana Maharashi and ended up living there for 20 years. 

He learnt Tamil and translated many books into English. He is widely regarded now as the principle scholar of Ramana’s teachings and spends his time translating his work. http://www.happinessofbeing.com/

Published on Apr 5, 2018

Stand-up philosopher and prolific author Tim Freke presents a new worldview in which God is not the source, but the destination. He opens with the radical idea that time does not pass, but accumulates, and with characteristic energy and passion, he suggests that reality is information, emerging first as matter, then as biology, and now as a distinct immaterial level – as spirit. Meaning, volition, magic and immortality belong exclusively to this level. This Emergent Spirituality offers a life-enhancing understanding of the deep purpose of existence, and can heal our modern soul crisis.

Published on Apr 6, 2018

A woman who has noticed that she has no control over her thoughts wants to know where they come from.

From the mind of world-famous philosopher and humanitarian Jean Vanier comes this exploration of life’s greatest questions: Who are we? Why are we here? What is the purpose of life? With his characteristically deep yet accessible style, the L’Arche founder encourages you to delve more deeply into your own faith and spirituality and helps you to find your own answers to life’s great questions.

Jean Vanier
is a philosopher, writer, religious and moral leader. In 2015 he was awarded the prestigious Templeton Prize. He is the founder of two major international community-based organizations, L’Arche, and Faith & Light, that exist for people with intellectual disabilities. The 135 L’Arche communities in 33 countries and 1,600 Faith & Light communities in 80 countries are living laboratories of human transformation. In and outside of these organizations, he has spent more than four decades as a deeply radical advocate for the poor and the weak in our society.

What does it mean to be fully human? Jean Vanier, Templeton Prize 2015

The 2015 Templeton Prize Laureate, Jean Vanier, speaks on the Big Question: “What does it mean to be fully human?”

Published on Apr 5, 2018

Deepak Chopra in conversation with Alan Steinfeld in front of an packed auditorium at The Assemblage collective workspace in NYC. Deepak speaks of a new way to integrate the mind, body and spirit.

Published on Apr 5, 2018

In this video – Amoda speaks about the innocent state of openness that is at the core of who you are. And how falling into this openness is the key to coming into alignment with the intelligence of love. She also talks about how spiritual inquiry is the invitation to uncover what stands in the way of this innocent openness.

The Dream of the Cosmos is the story of a multi-layered quest to understand the causes of human suffering and to reconnect with a deeper reality than the one we inhabit in this physical dimension of experience. It seeks to answer the questions: “Who are we?” and “Why are we here, on this planet?” It is offered to those who are looking for something beyond the superficial values of our culture, who may be disillusioned with religious and secular belief systems as currently presented and who question political values which are deeply mired in the pursuit of power. It is written with two voices: one the voice of a personal quest and the other which explores the historical and psychological causes that have brought into being our present view of reality.


Anne Baring (1931-) is the author and co-author of seven books and has recently published her latest one — “The Dream of the Cosmos: A Quest for the Soul”. She is a Jungian analyst and lives near Winchester, England. She is passionately interested in the fate of the Earth and the survival of our species in this critically important time of evolutionary change. Her work is devoted to the recognition that we live in an ensouled world and to the restoration of the lost sense of communion between us and the invisible dimension of the universe that is the source or ground of all that we call ‘life’. Website: http://www.annebaring.com

Anne Baring on “The Dream of the Cosmos”

In the course of writing two major books about the development of consciousness in the West and how the conscious mind became dissociated from the deeper matrix out of which it arose, I discovered that one of the foremost reasons for this was the split that developed between spirit and nature in the Western philosophical and religious traditions. This split arose from the belief that a Creator God inhabited a realm that was totally transcendent to the material world of nature and matter and from the repression and loss of the far older tradition of a Mother Goddess who brought forth all cosmic and earthly life from her womb, therefore unifying creator and creation.

In the West, from the sixteenth century onwards, science developed on the foundation of this split. Believing that matter is the only reality, it has taken the “rational mind” as its guide and the brain as the sole origin of consciousness, dismissing any alternative view as superstition. It has ultimately discarded both God and the soul. It apparently ignores the further potential evolutionary development of human consciousness and the states of mind that have long been explored in the metaphysical traditions of both East and West.

At the present time however, something of immense significance is emerging: a new cosmology is being born; a new vision of our profound relationship with a conscious, intelligent universe and a new consensus among a growing number of physicists, astro-physicists and cosmologists that cosmic consciousness and not matter is the primary ground of reality and our own consciousness. Instead of seeing the universe as a gigantic machine with our bodies as miniature machines, they are seeing it as a unified organism with ourselves as part of that multi-levelled organism.

This emerging paradigm, together with the growing environmental movement, gives us hope that we may rescue nature from our predatory and exploitive habits in time to counteract the danger of destroying not only millions more species, but our own as well. It invites us to recognise ourselves as having a role on this planet in the service of nature and ultimately the cosmos, to know ourselves in our innermost nature as cosmic beings, incarnated here for a purpose, aware of our fundamental unity. This awakening to a new phase of our evolutionary journey might be described as living the dream of the cosmos.

Suggested Reading: the book The Dream of the Cosmos with online chapters at http://www.annebaring.com

Anne Baring. MA Oxon (b. 1931) is a Jungian analyst and the author and co-author of seven books including, with Jules Cashford (1992), The Myth of the Goddess; Evolution of an Image; with Andrew Harvey, The Mystic Vision (1995) and The Divine Feminine (1996); and with Dr. Scilla Elworthy, Soul Power: an Agenda for a Conscious Humanity (2009). Her most recent book, published in May 2013, is The Dream of the Cosmos: a Quest for the Soul. Her work is devoted to the recognition that we live in an ensouled world and to the restoration of the lost sense of communion between us and the invisible dimension of the Cosmos that is the source or ground of all that we call ‘life’. Her website is devoted to the affirmation of a new vision of reality and the issues facing us at this crucial time of choice. See http://www.annebaring.com/

When you walk down the street you see other beings who are doing things… who are thinking things, who are wearing things, who are older or younger, who have personal lives. You see all the individual differences, but you also see them as packaging which holds that being.

This is a 1931 body and it’s decaying at a certain rate. It’s inevitable. I mean, I may prolong it or slow it down, but it’s inevitable. The personality of this being has a lot of residual little neuroses hanging around in it. It’s also charming, it’s delightful, it’s warm, it’s intelligent, it’s a personality, and those are my vehicles for being here on Earth.

It’s like a space suit, when you see those guys on the moon, and they’re encased in these suits. Those suits allow them to be in that particular element, and so we are in an element which requires that we be sheathed in a body and a personality.

Notice what I’m doing. I’m suggesting that we are not an identity with our personalities or our bodies, we are something more than that, and the predicament we face in recognizing this part of ourselves is that it isn’t ‘see-able’ with our eyes, isn’t ‘tasteable’ with our tongues… isn’t recognizable by any of our external senses.

So do we take this whole part of ourselves and assume it isn’t real?

All those times when you are not caught in your personality, or not caught in your role, or not caught in identifying with your body, do you assume at those moments, whatever you’re experiencing, is illegitimate? Do you say, “Oh, I thought I was crazy. I was out of my mind,” whatever I was thinking is irrelevant?

You don’t know what to do with that information that doesn’t relate to you as an object because the nature of your being is such that you can just be it.

You can’t know it, but you can be it.

At this moment there’s a body sitting here, there’s a personality, there’s speaking happening, and behind it all, inside, I’m sitting here. How could I describe myself? I would say that “I am.” The minute that I ascribe any adjective to it, I immediately reduce it to less than what it is, because finally what it is, is “I am.”

In meditation we call it “awareness”. It’s subject, it’s not object, you can’t think about it, because the thinking mind objectifies, and most of us are busy being who we think we are, and in that process, we make ourselves into objects. We think about ourselves, and first we are alienated from other people, and then we finally get alienated from ourselves. The Christians call this awareness, this being, the ‘soul.’

Now, we all project certain identities by our bodies and by our personalities, you can see who a person is by looking at them. You can see who they think they are. You can see it in the lines on their faces and the smile and the quality. You can see when somebody is feeling ugly, when they feel they’re unlovable, when they’re frightened.

And you can also see when people feel connected to beauty and connected to something deeper than themselves.
Source: Ram Dass

Thich Nhat Hanh, the Zen Buddhist master, has some interesting advice about what it means to truly let go.
Many people mistake detachment or non-clinging to be a form of aloofness, or emotional disconnect from others, but as Hanh explains, truly letting go often means loving someone more than you have ever loved them before.

The Buddha taught that detachment, one of the disciplines on the Noble Path, also called ariyasaavaka, is not a physical act of withdrawal or even a form of austerity. Though the Buddha teaches of a “non-action which is an integral part of the Right Way,” if it is taken out of context it can give the impression that we should develop a lack of concern for others, and that we should live without truly feeling or expressing our emotions – cutting ourselves off from life.

These type of misinterpretations are sadly common, since there are not always direct translations from the Paali language into English.

This form of “detachment” is an erroneous understanding of the Buddha’s message. Master Hanh states that to truly let go we must learn to love more completely. Non-attachment only happens when our love for another extends beyond our own personal expectations of gain, or our anticipation of a specific, desired outcome.

Hanh describes four forms of complete detachment, which surprisingly, aren’t about holing yourself up in a cave and ignoring everyone who has broken your heart, or ignoring your lust or desire for a romantic interest. This is not detachment. Letting go, means diving in. For example:

Maitri (Not the Love You Know)

Hanh describes the importance of Maitri, not love as we normally understand in a Westernized use of the word. He states,

“The first aspect of true love is maitri (metta, in Pali), the intention and capacity to offer joy and happiness. To develop that capacity, we have to practice looking and listening deeply so that we know what to do and what not to do to make others happy. If you offer your beloved something she does not need, that is not maitri. You have to see her real situation or what you offer might bring her unhappiness.”

In other words, your detachment may come in accepting that certain things you would normally do to make another person feel loved and appreciated may not be what the person you are actively loving now, needs. Instead of forcing that behavior on another person, with an egoic intent to “please” them, you simply detach from that need in yourself, and truly observe what makes another person feel comfortable, safe, and happy.

Hanh further explains,

“We have to use language more carefully. “Love” is a beautiful word; we have to restore its meaning. The word “maitri” has roots in the word mitra which means friend. In Buddhism, the primary meaning of love is friendship.”
Karuna (Compassion)

The next form of true detachment is compassion. When we let go, we don’t stop offering a compassionate touch, word, or deed to help someone who is in pain. We also don’t expect to take their hurt or pain away. Compassion contains deep concern, though. It is not aloofness It is not isolation from others.

The Buddha smiles because he understands why pain and suffering exist, and because he also knows how to transform it. You become more deeply involved in life when you become detached form the outcome, but this does not mean you don’t participate fully – even in others’ pain.

Gratitude and Joy

In truly letting go you practice gratitude. Mudita, or joy arises when we are overcome with gratitude for all that we have, such that we no longer cling to some other longed-for result. The Buddha’s definition of joy is more like “Unselfish joy.” It means that we don’t only find happiness when something good happens to us, but when others find happiness.

If you’ve ever had to say goodbye to a love or friend so that they could continue on their life’s path – one that may not have continued to intertwine with your own – you may have felt pain when they found someone new to love, or made a new friend that seemed to take your place. This is not true detachment. Joy arises when you find happiness even when others find joy – and it has little or nothing to do with you.
Upeksha (Equanimity)

Master Hanh describes the final quality of true love which sheds inordinate light on the true process of letting go.

He states,

“The fourth element of true love is upeksha, which means equanimity, non-attachment, nondiscrimination, even-mindedness, or letting go. Upa means “over,” and iksha means “to look.” You climb the mountain to be able to look over the whole situation, not bound by one side or the other. If your love has attachment, discrimination, prejudice, or clinging in it, it is not true love.

People who do not understand Buddhism sometimes think upeksha means indifference, but true equanimity is neither cold nor indifferent. If you have more than one child, they are all your children. Upeksha does not mean that you don’t love. You love in a way that all your children receive your love, without discrimination.”

Hanh explains that without this quality our love tends to become possessive – a stomping ground of the ego. We try to put our beloved in our pocket and carry them with us, when they are more like the wind, or a butterfly, or a stream, needing to move and flow, or risk dying. This is not love, this is destruction.

For love to be true love, it must have elements of compassion, joy, and equanimity – and thisis truly letting go.

The Art of Letting Go is Artless

The real secret is that letting go is not an art, it is an allowing, a being. A non-attached relationship is healthy, strong and filled with effortless love, kindness and compassion. It is completely selfless because your sense of ‘self’ is no longer asserted in every situation. If you want to truly let go, you’ve got to love more, not less. This is the most common misunderstanding about this priceless teaching of the Buddha.

Featured Image: Photo © Unified Buddhist Church.
Source: The Mind Unleashed

Published on Apr 2, 2018

Quotes from this Video:Published on Apr 2, 2018

Most people view life through the lens of their mind and emotions. But what would it be like to perceive reality as it truly arises? Adyashanti invites you to see and experience each moment directly from the ground of ever-present awareness.

Video Excerpted from “The Nature of Experience”:

Quotes from this Video:

For most human beings, their reference for what is real is in their mind and their emotions. Reality is what they think and feel. But as your sense of what’s real starts to come from the ground of being, then your whole reference for where you operate from shifts.

Helen Palmer, best-selling author of books in 30 languages, reconciles psychological knowing with intuitive wisdom through a faculty of perception commonly called Witnessing Consciousness.

 She describes how recognizing the patterns of our mind requires a simple turn of attention, and illustrates this with examples from the Enneagram, which allows individuals to see objective reality from the vantage point of their own type structure. This recognition and relaxation of the emotional patterns that drive behavior activates the life force, and can bring about a new level of human development.

In How to be Human, Ruby Wax tries to come up with some answers to that niggling question about how we can learn to like and love ourselves. With the input of a Buddhist monk (an expert on our inner lives) and a neuroscientist (an expert on the brain), Ruby explores how to find happiness in the modern world – despite the constant bombardment of bad news, the need to choose between 5,000 different types of toothpaste, and the loneliness of having hundreds of friends who we’ve never met and don’t know us.

Filled with witty anecdotes from Ruby’s own life, and backed up by scientific authority, How to be Human is the only guide you need for building a healthy, happy relationship with yourself.

It took us 4 billion years to evolve to where we are now. No question, anyone reading this has won the evolutionary Hunger Games by the fact you’re on all twos and not some fossil. This should make us all the happiest species alive – most of us aren’t, what’s gone wrong? We’ve started treating ourselves more like machines and less like humans. We’re so used to upgrading things like our iPhones: as soon as the new one comes out, we don’t think twice, we dump it. (Many people I know are now on iWife4 or iHusband8, the motto being, if it’s new, it’s better.)

We can’t stop the future from arriving, no matter what drugs we’re on. But even if nearly every part of us becomes robotic, we’ll still, fingers crossed, have our minds, which, hopefully, we’ll be able use for things like compassion, rather than chasing what’s ‘better’, and if we can do that we’re on the yellow brick road to happiness.

I wrote this book with a little help from a monk, who explains how the mind works, and also gives some mindfulness exercises, and a neuroscientist who explains what makes us ‘us’ in the brain. We answer every question you’ve ever had about: evolution, thoughts, emotions, the body, addictions, relationships, kids, the future and compassion. How to be Human is extremely funny, true and the only manual you’ll need to help you upgrade your mind as much as you’ve upgraded your iPhone.


Ruby Wax, OBE (born Ruby Wachs; 19 April 1953) is an American actress, mental health campaigner, lecturer, and author who holds both American and British citizenship.

A classically-trained actress, Wax came to prominence as a comic interviewer, playing up to British perceptions of the strident American style, which she replicated in the TV sitcom Girls on Top. She also appeared in Absolutely Fabulous, where she doubled as script editor. Her memoirs, How Do You Want Me?, reached the Sunday Times best-seller list.

Wax pursued a distinguished academic career, graduating in psychology at the University of California, Berkeley and gaining a master’s degree in mindfulness-based cognitive therapy from Oxford University. Wax is currently a Visiting Professor in Mental Health Nursing at the University of Surrey.
Bio from Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Photo by S Pakhrin (Flickr) [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons.

How To Be Human | Ruby Wax

What do you get when Ruby Wax, a monk and a neuroscientist team up to write a book? How to be Human: The Manual – which has already been described by Joanna Lumley as ‘wise, practical and funny’. ‘How to Be Human is wise, practical and funny. It is a handbook for those in despair. Ruby, the Monk and the Neuroscientist are today’s Magi’ Joanna Lumley

Ruby Wax in conversation with a Neuroscientist, a Monk & Louise Chunn

It took us 4 billion years to evolve to where we are now. No question, anyone reading this has won the ‘Evolutionary Hunger Games’ by the fact you’re on all 2’s and not some fossil. This should make us all the happiest species alive – but most of us aren’t, what’s gone wrong? Why have we started treating ourselves like machines and less like humans? But even as technology takes over the world, we’ll still, fingers crossed, have our minds, which, hopefully, we’ll be able use for things like compassion, rather than chasing what’s ‘better’ – and if we can do that we’re on the yellow brick road to happiness. It’s time to upgrade your mind as often as you upgrade your iPhone. Hear Ruby Wax, monk Gelong Thubton and neuroscientist Ash Ranpura discuss her new book, How to be Human, covering everything from addictions to relationships, via evolution, sex, kids, compassion, and the future of humanity. ————————————————————————-

Published on Apr 1, 2018

Andrew B. Newberg, M.D. is currently the Associate Director in Charge of Research at the Marcus Institute of Integrative Health at Thomas Jefferson University and Hospital in Philadelphia. He is also a Professor in the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Radiology at Thomas Jefferson University and he is adjunct professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. 

Dr. Newberg has been particularly involved in the study of mystical and religious experiences, a field referred to as “neurotheology”. He has also studied the more general mind/body relationship in both the clinical and research aspects of his career including understanding the physiological correlates of acupuncture therapy, meditation, and other types of alternative therapies. He has published over 200 peer reviewed articles and chapters on brain function, brain imaging, and the study of religious and mystical experiences.

Books:

He is the author of the new book entitled, “Neurotheology: How Science Can Enlighten Us About Spirituality” and is also the co-author of
How Enlightenment Changes Your Brain: The New Science of Transformation”.
He is the co-author of the best selling books, “How God Changes Your Brain: Breakthrough Findings from a Leading Neuroscientist” (Ballantine) and,
“Why God Won’t Go Away: Brain Science and the Biology of Belief” 
(Ballantine). And he is the author of several academic books including,
The Metaphysical Mind: Probing the Biology of Philosophical Thought”;
“Principles of Neurotheology (Routledge Science and Religion Series)” (Ashgate);
 and co-author of
The Metaphysical Mind: Probing the Biology of Philosophical Thought” (Fortress Press). The latter book received the 2000 award for Outstanding Books in Theology and the Natural Sciences presented by the Center for Theology and the Natural Sciences.

He has also produced a 24 lecture video program entitled, “The Spiritual Brain,” for The Teaching Company. He has presented his work at scientific and religious meetings throughout the world and has appeared on Dr. Oz, Good Morning America, Nightline, 20/20, CNN, ABC World News Tonight as well as in nationally distributed movies: “What the Bleep Do We Know!?”; Bill Maher’s “Religulous”; and “AWAKE: The Life of Yogananda”. His work has been featured in a number of media articles including in Newsweek, Time, National Geographic, Discover, O Magazine, New York Times, Los Angeles Times, London Observer, Philadelphia Inquirer, and Readers Digest. Additional information regarding books and research can be found at http://www.andrewnewberg.com.

Published on Apr 1, 2018

Tina RasmussenLiving The Enlightenment Drive’ Interview by Renate McNay

Tina teaches Jhana Meditation and helps students recognise their deeper nature, both on the cushion and in daily life. She wrote the book “Practicing the Jhanas” with her teaching partner Stephen Snyder. She also worked as an organisation development consultant and coach for more the 25 years and published several books on humanistic business practices.

Tina learned to meditate at age 13 and had been attending long silent meditation retreats. For years she practiced in Buddhist and Non-Dual traditions. She had a natural talent for concentration meditation and undertook an intensive year-long solo retreat during which a profound awakening to true nature occurred. 

After life-changing experiences Tina felt the strong pull to become a “cave yogi” but as the awakening matured, it was compelling to her to function in the world from an awakened perspective. 

She was the first Western Women who completed the entire Samatha path including the eight Jhanas and was authorised to teach by Burmese meditation Master Ven.Pa Auk Sayadaw. She is also practicing the “Diamond Approach” by H. A. Almaas. http://www.awakeningdharma.com

Easy Breezy Prosperity is a holistic guide to discover and nurture prosperity and align your life with your spiritual core. Author Emmanuel Dagher redefines what real prosperity means and offers you tactics to expand and enrich yourself well beyond financial goals. By examining how and why we treat money the way we do, Dagher shows you how to realize the success you have already created and cultivate the clarity needed to attract more of it in your daily life. Each chapter is designed to empower you, leaving you feeling optimistic not only about their working lives and finances, but also your entire life’s path.

Dagher shares his own story and those of his clients and fans who have turned their lives around using his meditations, rituals, and exercises. He also includes a 28-day plan with simple yet effective daily practices you can use, such as:

* Expressing gratitude each morning for all that you have
* Cultivating a healthy relationship with money through “money healing” practices
* Seeking out opportunities to be of service through your time, energy, gifts, or abilities
* De-cluttering your space and mind to allow positivity to enter

Easy Breezy Prosperity is a powerfully motivating plan to take action, strengthen self-confidence, and enjoy a more joyful and abundant life.

Emmanuel Dagher is a transformation specialist, wellness practitioner,
and inspirational figure who has worked with people from all walks of life including heads of state and fortune 500 companies to your everyday next door neighbor. He is the author of the international bestseller Easy Breezy Miracles. Emmanuel also serves as a global humanitarian who is devoted to assisting with anchoring more peace, well-being and compassion in the world. He lives in Los Angeles.

Heal Your Relationship w/ Money & Attract More of It! | Emmanuel Dagher | Easy Breezy Prosperity


Rupert Spira – The Importance of Perception

Who among us has not been reviewing our sexual past these last few weeks.

You have been, right? #metoo

It’s made me realize that more than anything else this Thanksgiving , I’m thankful to the men who have been kind to me. Who respected me. Who said, when shadows from the past came upon us, “Marianne, I am not that guy.” With so many sexual shadows in our society being uncovered these days – an uncovering being done because it must be done – it feels important to remember as well the men who are not that guy.

It is not just the traumatic events of our lives but also the events that surround them and come after them, that determine how they influence our lives going forward. I have been through some rotten events in my life and assault was one of them. But the tears I cry now when I think of those things are not for the pain that was inflicted upon me, but rather gratitude to those who helped me live through it…survive, and so much more. Some were women, and some were men.

It was in the middle of the night in 1967, when I was seventeen years old, that a young man took two doors in our house off their hinges, made his way to my bedroom, and sprang like a cat from a crawled position at my bedroom door to land right on top of me as I lay in my bed on the other side of the room. I had heard the door slowly open; I remember lifting my head up and saying, “Mommy?”

No, it was not Mommy.

What occurred afterward is not something I want to write about. But I understand the trauma many women are describing today. I understand the tears and I understand the fear. I also understand that through the grace of God each one of them can and will have a wonderful life ahead of her. “God Himself will wipe away all tears” is one of the most powerful sentences in the Bible, or anywhere.

I did not grow up at a time where you were taught to just stuff your painful feelings, no. I was encouraged to feel them and work through them. But I was also taught that such a painful situation was just one thing that would happen in my life — that it would affect me but not define me. I look at that situation as having increased my capacity to understand and feel compassion for others. And for that I am grateful.

In 1993, I published a book called ILLUMINATA. I remembered over the last few days that I wrote in that book about Sexual Violation. I include it here:

Sexual Violation

There is a category of sex that is very dark. I mean rape, incest, molestation, abuse of any number of varieties, centered around sex, then lodged like a knife in people’s souls. It is now more pervasive, more of an issue in American society, than anyone would have imagined or predicted twenty years ago. Millions of people are thought to carry the burden, the vicious psychic wounding of someone somewhere having violated them sexually. Sexual abuse survivors are haunted by horrible memories, in bed and out. Their efforts to forgive can feel like the need to lift a boulder with one little finger, their access to one of the most beautiful human energies having been sullied and damaged and grossly misused.

They are here among us and their tears run deep. Sexual abuse is an obscene betrayal. It is such a sign of the insanity of our times that anyone would touch a child, yet many people do; that anyone would rape, yet some people do; that anyone would have to suffer such a terrible transgression, yet many people have and do.

Dear God,
Please help me to heal in the area of sex.
I feel so wounded, so damaged, betrayed by those
I thought were here to love me and protect me.
No words can say the pain I feel, when I remember the abuse I suffered.
I surrender to You my memories and my anger toward this person.
Please lift from me the burden of my resentment.
Please release me from this terrible pain.
Amen

Dear God,
I release to You this terrible wound.
I surrender to You my pain, my anger, my fear of disease, my feeling that I will never again
Have a healthy experience of sex.
Only a miracle can lift this burden from my heart.
Please send Your angels to help me and heal me.
Help me feel my body is pure and not tainted.
Help me to forgive my offender,
That peace might flood my heart.
Give me new life.
Thank you.
Amen

(Exorcism of the sexually abused to be said by a healer)

In the name of God and all His angels,
I cast out the demon left in you by this evil.
I say unto you, the force of darkness, be gone from this beloved child.
Through the power of God within us, I order you gone,
Nevermore to return or to cast your wicked energies in the direction
Of this precious child of God.
In the name of God, I command you gone.
Dear God, please bind this prayer to earth.
Thank you very much.

Amen.

— from ILLUMINATA

That was my offering then and it is my offering now. To those who have suffered, I send my good will. To those of you who have helped us heal, I send my thanks.

Source:Marianne Williamson

Published on Mar 30, 2018(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) 

Deepak Chopra, MD, a leading pioneer in integrative medicine, shares insights from his new book, “The Healing Self,” on how to protect your immune system by managing stress and reducing inflammation – two key factors for lifelong wellness. 

Chopra is presented by the 2018 Writer’s Symposium by the Sea at Point Loma Nazarene University. 

Published on Mar 29, 2018

(Visit: http://www.uctv.tv/) Following his presentation to the 2018 Writer’s Symposium by the Sea at Point Loma Nazarene University, Deepak Chopra, MD talks with host Dean Nelson about breakthroughs in integrative medicine and understanding the mind-body connections that lead to wellness.

Published on Mar 30, 2018

In this video, Eckhart Tells how through proper listening we can access Inner Peace!

Published on Mar 30, 2018

In response to the sharing on facing uncertainty, Igor Kufayev speaks on what it means and how it relates to our time.

Published on Mar 30, 2018

A woman asks Rupert to interpret the biblical story of Moses and the burning bush when God says ‘I am’.
From the weekend in Verona – March 2018.

Published on Mar 29, 2018

Unwind, relax, and deepen into the present moment. In this powerful video montage, Eckhart takes us on the journey of understanding and feeling one of his most essential teachings: The Power of Now. As we listen to Eckhart’s words and enjoy the beautiful imagery, we are reminded that what’s truly important, is already here.

A guide for achieving an enlightened mind through the art of non-doing

• Details meditation practices, focused on stillness of the mind, along with Patanjali’s yoga methods to maintain a consciousness referred to as “being in the zone”

• Builds on Taoist, Confucian, and Hindu principles along with scientific findings to support wu-wei–the art of non-doing, non-forcing–as a way of life

• Explains how wu-wei practitioners cultivate intelligent spontaneity and effortless action to allow the natural harmony of the cosmos to prevail

The practice of non-doing, non-forcing is an essential aspect of Taoism known as wu-wei. Attributed to the great sage Lao-tzu, the philosophy of wu-wei teaches you how to develop a natural state of consciousness not bound by thought or preconceived limitations. Experienced by the greatest artists, athletes, musicians, and writers, this heightened state of consciousness, referred to as “being in the zone,” is where intelligent spontaneity and effortless action flourish via a practice rooted in permitting the natural harmony of the cosmos to prevail.

Merging Taoist philosophy, Hindu principles, and Confucianism along with scientific findings, Jason Gregory outlines the practice of wu-wei as a vehicle to realize our innate freedom, revealing that when we release our ego and allow life to unfold as it will, we align ourselves more closely with our goals and cultivate skill and mastery along the way. Equating “being in the zone” with a stillness of the mind, Gregory shares meditation practices coupled with yoga exercises from Patanjali that allow you to approach life with a mastery of acceptance, releasing deluded beliefs of how to achieve success that make your mind “sticky” and poised for conflict. The author shows how practicing wu-wei paradoxically empowers you to accomplish all that you desire by having no intention to do so, as well as allowing you to become receptive to nature’s blueprint for expressing beauty.

Revealing wisdom utilized by renowned sages, artists, and athletes who have adapted “being in the zone” as a way of life, the author shows that wu-wei can yield a renewed sense of trust in many aspects of your daily life, making each day more effortless. As an avid wu-wei practitioner, he provides keen insight on how you, too, can experience the beauty of achieving an enlightened, effortless mind while reveling in the process of life’s unfolding.


JASON GREGORY is an author, philosopher, and teacher specializing in Eastern and Western philosophy, comparative religion, psychology, cognitive science, metaphysics, and ancient cultures. He is the author of Fasting the Mind, Enlightenment Now, and The Science and Practice of Humility. For several years he has lived in Asia studying the classical spiritual traditions of the East.

Jason lived in India studying the Hindu schools of Vedanta and classical Yoga, and the Buddhist schools of Mahayana and Zen. While living in Nepal he studied Vajrayana and Tibetan Buddhism. He lived in South Korea studying Korean Buddhism, Confucianism, Neo-Confucianism, and Taoism. In South East Asia Jason lived in Thailand studying Theravada Buddhism and its monastic Forest Tradition, while taking numerous research trips into the monasteries and temples of Cambodia, Laos, Myanmar, and Vietnam. Jason has traveled extensively to over 15 countries.

His work is focused on the benefits of Eastern wisdom in the modern world and how it can transform our lives to live more optimally and peacefully. Jason travels worldwide lecturing about the East, its science of mind, and the methods and practices that define the East, and how its philosophy is a cure not only for the individual’s mind but also for the cultural, social, and religious problems in the world. Visit the author’s website at http://www.jasongregory.org

Flow and Wu-wei

In this episode of Enlightenment Today you will learn about what a state of flow truly is and its original ancestor known in Chinese as wu-wei from ancient China, which is a concept at the heart of Taoism and martial arts. Flow is a term we use for an athlete, musician, writer, craftsman, or any artist when they appear to be in the zone. But our understanding of flow and how to induce it is at a novice level. You can tell this by how the word is loosely thrown around in popular culture. Most of us incorrectly think that this dimension of effortless skill and peak performance is a state of mind isolated to world-class performers. You need to eliminate this way of thinking and really absorb the information I am about to give you. This episode will give you the inside dope.

We Are All Creators of This Reality! We have forgotten the divinity that is inside all of us. We are able of achieving miracles but our educational system teaches that matter is the highest there is, but we know better know don’t we? 

Everything is energy, every emotion or situation is purely energy, we don’t have senses to sense emotions, but what we do sense is energy. 

Ancient civilizations were very well aware of this, and they were master in harnessing and directing energy to they’re will. We must reclaim this knowledge. We are not the victims of this reality, we are the creators of it. We must remember that nature’s natural state is abundance! When something is lacking in the natural world the eco-system will be out of balance and will not thrive but try to survive. 

This is humanity right now, we are not really living we are merely surviving. Regain your ancient power and be in charge of your experience here on the physical plane. 

►We from You Create Your Reality provides in daily videos to help you Be the best you can Be!! Break Free from this Matrix of Illusions and Reach your Full Potential!

Published on Mar 28, 2018

In this video, Alan Watts tells the importance of Discipline in attaining Self-Realisation!

Published on Mar 28, 2018

In response to the sharing on the changing perception of involuntary manifestations at life events, Igor Kufayev speaks on the process of absorption into finer realms of one’s being. Excerpt from the 3-day long immersion in Freiburg, Germany, Dec 2017. Website: https://www.igorkufayev.com

Published on Mar 27, 2018

In this video, Eckhart Tolle tells who you actually are at the deepest level!

A true spiritual teacher does not have anything to teach in the conventional sense of the word, does not have anything to give or add to you, such as new information, beliefs, or rules of conduct. The only function of such a teacher is to help you remove that which separates you from the truth of who you already are and what you already know in the depth of your being. 

The spiritual teacher is there to uncover and reveal to you that dimension of the inner depth that is also peace. If you come to a spiritual teacher or this book looking for stimulating ideas, theories, beliefs, intellectual discussions, then you will be disappointed. In other words, if you are looking for food for thought, you won’t find it. And you will miss the very essence of the teaching, the essence of this book which is not in the words but within yourself. A true spiritual teacher does not have anything to teach in the conventional sense of the word, does not have anything to give or add to you, such as new information, beliefs, or rules of conduct. The only function of such a teacher is to help you remove that which separates you from the truth of who you already are and what you already know in the depth of your being. 

The spiritual teacher is there to uncover and reveal to you that dimension of the inner depth that is also peace. If you come to a spiritual teacher or this book looking for stimulating ideas, theories, beliefs, intellectual discussions, then you will be disappointed. 

In other words, if you are looking for food for thought, you won’t find it. And you will miss the very essence of the teaching, the essence of this book which is not in the words but within yourself. It is good to remember that, to feel that, as you listen. The words are no more than signposts. That to which they point is not to be found within the realm of thought but a dimension within yourself that is deeper, and infinitely vaster than thought. A vibrantly alive peace is one of the characteristics of that dimension. So whenever you feel inner peace arising as you listen, the book is doing it work and fulfilling its function as your teacher. It is reminding you of who you are and pointing the way back home.

 Excerpt from: Eckhart Tolle “Stillness Speaksis good to remember that, to feel that, as you listen. The words are no more than signposts. That to which they point is not to be found within the realm of thought but a dimension within yourself that is deeper, and infinitely vaster than thought. A vibrantly alive peace is one of the characteristics of that dimension. So whenever you feel inner peace arising as you listen, the book is doing it work and fulfilling its function as your teacher. It is reminding you of who you are and pointing the way back home. Excerpt from: Eckhart Tolle “Stillness Speaks

Eckhart Tolle talks about the concept of enlightenment.

Many people think that enlightenment is an altered state of consciousness. Actually, what we perceive every day through the distorted lens of ego is the truly altered state — we see things that don’t exist, we believe things that aren’t happening, and we live in a false world of our own creation. In this direct and practical satsang, Adyashanti opens the door into the clear seeing that is our natural state of enlightenment.

Published on Mar 24, 2018

In this video, Eckhart Tolle tells how we can stop the self talk in the head!

%d bloggers like this: