Eckhart Tolle , The Meaning Of Karma

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Top 9 Nostradamus predictions for 2019

Top 9 Nostradamus predictions for 2019
The Truth can change Your life

A TIMELESS NEW YEAR’S TUNE – AULD LANG SYNE

English translation
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and never brought to mind?
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
and old lang syne?

CHORUS:
For auld lang syne, my dear,
for auld lang syne,
we’ll take a cup of kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.
And surely you’ll buy your pint cup!
and surely I’ll buy mine!
And we’ll take a cup o’ kindness yet,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS
We two have run about the slopes,
and picked the daisies fine;
But we’ve wandered many a weary foot,
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS
We two have paddled in the stream,
from morning sun till dine†;
But seas between us broad have roared
since auld lang syne.

CHORUS
And there’s a hand my trusty friend!
And give me a hand o’ thine!
And we’ll take a right good-will draught,
for auld lang syne.

CHORUS

Rupert Spira – That Which Doesn’t Change [Great Talk]

Published on Dec 28, 2018

Ascension Meditation, with Thomas Howell (Ishtar Ishaya)

Thomas Howell (Ishtar Ishaya) is a teacher of Ascension Meditation. In this interview he takes us through his fascinating life, from recalling early spiritual experiences, through tragedy and a near death experience, to spiritual exploration and a settling on Ascension

Thomas explains that he chose Ascension as a practice as it seeks to charm the mind with praise, gratitude and love, as opposed to using control or discipline. He found this gentle approach opened up profound states of non-dual awareness

Eckhart Tolle Talks – Realize The Key Of Success (P2)

Eckhart Tolle Talks – Realize The Key Of Success (P1)

Awareness Cannot Know Itself as an Object but Is Never Not Known

Published on 28 Dec 2018
After an investigation of perceptions, a man recognises that awareness can experience itself during the presence as well as the absence of objects.

Adyashanti – True Nature Embodying Itself

Thomas Hübl – 2nd Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Published on 27 Dec 2018

Thomas Hübl is a modern mystic, spiritual teacher, author, and systems-thinker. His work integrates the essence of the great wisdom traditions, scientific knowledge, and his own personal experience.

Thomas offers a unique approach to life as a ‘mystic in the marketplace’ and helps people to attain a deeper level of self-awareness and personal relationship and to transcend a ‘culture of the personal’ and a self-centered worldview. Through his work, people from all walks of life learn how to become a living expression of spirit and how to participate in ‘we cultures’ through an embodied inner and outer connection.

His teachings combine transformation through the integration of trauma, somatic sensitization, advanced meditative practice, and a deepening understanding of cultural processes. Since 2004, Thomas’ leading-edge work has spread worldwide through workshops, multi-year training programs, and online courses. The non-profit ‘Celebrate Life Festival‘ brings together more than 1,200 people every year and has showcased a wide network of experts in various disciplines, through dialogue and exchange. In 2008 Thomas founded the ‘Academy of Inner Science’. This provided a framework for dialogue between the inner science of consciousness and the external scientific-academic exploration of life.

Over the years Thomas has also organized several major healing events, aimed at healing the Holocaust’s cultural shadows. Thousands of Germans and Israelis have been brought together through these processes. In 2016 Thomas and his wife Yehudit founded the non-profit ‘Pocket Project‘, with the aim of exploring collective trauma and shadow work and integrating this through large-scale group processes. A global organization has been launched, intended to research and explore specific aspects of local traumatization. This applies both to past traumas and also to current conflict zones. Thomas was born in Austria in 1971 and now lives in Tel Aviv, Israel, with his wife, the Israeli artist Yehudit Sasportas and their daughter Eliya.

New Year Message 2018

Published on 26 Dec 2018

Richard speaks of the Christmas allegory of the birth of the Christ child as the awakening of an essential aspect of consciousness potential in all of us and how this can grow stronger in us as we welcome and consecrate ourselves for the New Year

Which Jesus Do You Believe In?

Posted on December 25, 2018

by Philip Goldman: Growing up in Brooklyn, long before it was “Hipsterville,” I was familiar with three kinds of Jesus…

There was the one and only begotten son of God, Savior of all Mankind, who was worshiped by many of the Irish and Italian Catholics in the neighborhood. And, among the Jews, two alternative versions: the laudable, ethical teacher—a nice Jewish boy, essentially, who met with a terrible fate—and the Jesus they considered a creature of mythology, like Apollo or Zeus.

In my atheistic home, where religion was the opium of the people, Jesus was largely irrelevant, except as a proponent of the “golden rule” and for the horrors that had been perpetrated in his name by misguided followers.

Then came the 60s, and I was introduced to a different Jesus, by way of India. Like millions of my contemporaries, my hot pursuit of truth and personal fulfillment led me to the spiritual legacy of the East. I read the sacred texts of Hinduism and Buddhism, and modern interpreters such as Aldous Huxley, Alan Watts, and Huston Smith. I was drawn to what was called mysticism because I found it, ironically, far less mysterious and far more rational than conventional religion—and even some schools of psychology.

I found a yoga class—not easy to do back then, believe it or not—and learned to meditate. Throughout my explorations, I was surprised to find that Jesus was always referred to with great respect, and sometimes with reverence. That experience peaked when I read Paramahansa Yogananda’s seminal memoir, Autobiography of a Yogi. In it—and even more so in other works, as I discovered later when I researched my biography of him—Yogananda treats the rabbi of Nazareth with such veneration that I couldn’t help thinking: What have I been missing?

So, I read the New Testament. It blew my mind. Because my spiritual reference point was more Hindu than Judeo-Christian, the Gospels came off the page like the Upanishads or the Bhagavad Gita, not like churchy dogma. The main character was a master teacher—a guru—who guided his disciples not just to better behavior but to union with the divine. His term for the infinite Ground of Being was “Father,” but it was easy to evoke the language of the Vedic seers and substitute Brahman or Ishvara or the Self.

When he tells the crowd at the Sermon on the Mount not to pray conspicuously like the hypocrites, but to “go into your room and shut the door and pray to your Father who is in secret,” I saw a guru directing his disciples to meditate in silence. This was a Jesus I could live with: exalted in a way that befits someone whose impact on history is unparalleled, but without the singular cosmos-shaking agenda or the religious triumphalism that relegates nonbelievers to either irrelevance or damnation.

I soon learned that Hindus in general, and the gurus and yoga masters who came to the West in particular, tended to see Jesus as a satguru (true teacher) and an enlightened yogi of the highest order. Some even afforded him the status of avatar, placing him on the same level as Krishna and Rama in the pantheon of divine incarnations.

To them, the teachings of Christ, followed properly and deeply, is a legitimate pathway to the unified awareness that is yoga’s true aim. That is why, in many spiritual institutions with Indian roots, you will find images of Jesus placed alongside the Buddha and other saints and avatars. In Yogananda centers, in fact, a portrait of Jesus is on every altar, alongside one of Krishna, Yogananda himself, and the three venerated gurus in his lineage.

This way of seeing Jesus has been filtering into America’s bloodstream ever since the 19th Century when Henry David Thoreau equated Jesus and Buddha and called himself a yogi. It gathered steam as a stately parade of gurus arrived on our shores, and it exploded after the Beatles’ 1968 sojourn in India. By now, that perspective has affected millions.

For a great many angry or alienated Christians, it has been the key to reconnecting with their religious heritage on terms they can live with. Even people whose religious orientation is, for all practical purposes, Hindu have been encouraged by their gurus to honor their Christian roots, often by thinking of Jesus as their ishta devata (preferred form of God). In that context, many prodigal sons and daughters have found their way back to the Jesus they love by way of India. Similarly, thousands of Jews who studied Hinduism or Buddhism have come to see Jesus as a great mystical rabbi and a passionate reformer, not as the founder of a hostile cult.

The image of Jesus as a sage and sadhguru may not sit well with clerics for whom Christ can only be the one true messiah and the great hinge of history. They ought to be glad that millions who might otherwise view this season as merely a respite from work, or as nothing but humbug, will instead celebrate the birthday of a great, holy man. That’s what I’ll be doing.

Each December it makes the season merrier, jollier, and brighter. That and The Drifters’ version of “White Christmas.”

Source: Elephant Journal

Awareness Explorers Episode 16: “Lynn Marie Lumiere, Guest Explorer”

n this episode we talk with Lynn Marie Lumiere about how your relationships can grow in harmony through non-dual awareness.

Includes a guided meditation from Lynn Marie pointing to the loving awareness that’s always present.

Awareness Explorers Episode 9: Rupert Spira, Guest Explorer

Brian Tom O’Connor

In this episode we talk to Rupert Spira about happiness, and how he leads people to the recognition of our true nature as awareness.

Includes a guided meditation from Rupert for going beyond our normal notion of self into the experience of pure awareness.

Awareness Explorers Episode 19: Rick Archer, Guest Explorer

Published on Dec 7, 2018
In this episode we talk to Rick Archer of “Buddha at the Gas Pump” about the advantages and ethical pitfalls of gurus and spiritual teachers.

Don’t forget to subscribe for more ingenious ways to tap into the ever-present stillness and joy of our true nature.

http://bit.ly/awarenessexplorersitunes

Sri Ramana Maharshi – JNANI 2018

Documentary on the great Indian sage Sri Ramana Maharshi. Released publicly on 25th May 2018.

Rick Archer SAND Conference Q&A and Interview by Shakti Caterina Maggi – Buddha at the Gas Pump

Published on Dec 5, 2018

This video contains my Question and Answer session at the 2018 Science and Nonduality conference. and also an interview of me by Shakti Caterina Maggi, an Italian spiritual teacher who used to be a journalist. My SAND Q&A includes the following points:

How BatGap started.
Which guests have been the most interesting, provocative, intriguing, brilliant, mysterious, surprising, etc.?
What insights have I gained? How has this process influenced my spiritual path? What do I experience while I’m interviewing people? What do I foresee for BatGap in the next few years?
How to deal with family and friends who don’t understand your awakening or interest in spirituality?
A consideration of sudden vs. gradual awakenings.
How do I regard the urgency of humanity’s need to take a spiritual/cultural leap in response to the dire predicament facing us?
The joy and challenge of speaking with people from such a broad range of spiritual backgrounds.
Why science and spirituality need and can benefit one another.
The importance of understanding consciousness to be the fundamental to the universe rather than merely a product of brain functioning.

Shakti’s interview includes the following points:

In which direction are we as consciousness moving? How might the growing awakening of consciousness help humanity avert disaster?

Embodied spirituality vs. avoidance of life through transcendence. Consciousness is relevant to every field of human endeavor.
Consciousness is fundamental to matter.

Finding the foundation of our being and dealing with individual planetary problems from that foundation.
Ethical standards for spiritual teachers.

When is one ready to become a spiritual teacher? The potential consequences of entering the profession prematurely.

The guru is a function of consciousness which can work through imperfect bodies and personalities.

The importance of teachers and students having the humility to acknowledge that we’re all works in progress.

Culturing discernment and discrimination.
Having the freedom to ask anything in a teacher/student relationship in order to dispel doubts.

Is it possible to establish absolute guidelines on appropriate teacher behavior?

The quality of awakening will vary according to one’s constitution.
Awakening enhances individual differences while establishing our fundamental unity.

Sticking with one teacher vs. working with many.
The importance of sincerity. The principle of “the highest first”.

Let’s Wake Up: Deepak Chopra

Published on Dec 21

Deepak Chopra talks about his journey from medical school in India and the United States to the experiences and research that have brought him to his present understanding – that the universe, the body, the mind, and everything that we have a name for, is a human construct. “No system of thought can give you access to reality,” he says. For that, you have to go to the source of thought, which is consciousness.

Rupert Spira – Awareness Is Always Present

Published on Dec 21, 2018

Rupert Spira – Awareness Is Always Present

1. To be in the world and not of it is to know you are a spiritual being having a human experience 2.Cultivating non local awareness


Published on Dec 22, 2018

Be aware right now of the space around you, notice how it engulfs every object including your body/mind and is also at the same time independent of it.

Cultivating non local awareness

When you sense your body with total awareness you will open the door to insight, creativity, vision and non local awareness. Try it out.

Self Realization is the Highest Healing ~ Deepak Chopra

Deepak explains how everything in the universe is an activity and he guides you to know yourself as the infinite.

Belief Goes; Illusion Remains ~ Rupert Spira

Published on 21 Dec 2018
A man is torn between his understanding that ‘all is consciousness’ and his belief in the existence of matter.

A Discussion on Teacher-Student Romantic Relationships – Buddha at the Gas Pump

Published on Dec 19, 2018
The Association of Professional Spiritual Teachers does not have a moralistic, judgmental orientation. It’s a community endeavor. We don’t agree among ourselves on certain points. We’re trying to balance our subjective perspectives with standards that fit our contemporary culture.

A key point of disagreement is the issue of teacher-student romantic/sexual relationships. None of us are rigid or adamant in our opinions.We’re trying to work it out.

There are exceptions to every generality. In graduate school, psychotherapists are taught that it will never be appropriate for therapist sand their clients to become partners.

Relationships tend to be the most challenging aspect of people’s lives. These challenges shouldn’t bleed into a teacher’s teaching activities.

When a teacher/student or therapist/client relationship transitions into romantic involvement, the potential for growth is undermined.
Sometimes “divine compulsion” arises in your spiritual path,shattering your conception of appropriate behavior.

The problem with teachers who haven’t transcended desire and explored their own shadow.
There can be a huge disparity between the apparent enlightenment of a teacher and their behavior.

Isolation and being closed to constructive criticism can be very dangerous for a teacher.

If a teacher doesn’t have friends other than his students,he might want to ask why. If he doesn’t have regular relationships and is always on a pedestal, he won’t get real world feedback.
The culture is changing anyway. We’re just trying to give voice to values that are becoming lively in collective consciousness.
There can be a lot of practice involved in having your actions be a reflection of your deepest understanding.

Tara Talks: Living with an Undefended Heart, with Tara Brach

Published on Dec 19, 2018

Tara Talks: Living with an Undefended Heart, with Tara Brach

In order to touch our vulnerability, we must first learn to recognize the habitual ways we avoid it. Anger, blame and chronic judging are all ways that we armor ourselves against vulnerability. When we bring loving presence to our wounded places, the armoring falls away and we discover the possibility of living with an undefended heart.

Ethics and Spiritual Teaching SAND Panel – Buddha at the Gas Pump

Published on Dec 19, 2018

Questioning whether higher consciousness and ethicalbehavior are tightly correlated.

The founding of the Association of Professional SpiritualTeachers.
The attempt to formulate a code of ethics that might applyuniversally in the contemporary spiritual community and enliven an understanding of what may or may not be appropriate, giving students greater confidence in their own discernment and discrimination.

Ancient traditions held the teacher beyond reproach and students surrendered their own will. This may have worked in monastic settingsbut generally does not work today.

Preventative support so we’re not busy doing cleanup.

Power hierarchies should not be an essential part ofspiritual development and can lead to abuses.

Spiritual awakening does not necessarily qualify a person tooffer advice on relationships, finances, etc.
Ethical training of some sort is integral to most honoredtraditions.
The issue of sexism and patriarchy in spiritualorganizations.

Entering the teaching profession prematurely.

All too often, when teachers are challenged on their behavior, they ignore the challenger or become defensive.

How do we offer the possibility for redemption and atonement?

Moving away from a culture of competition to one ofcooperation.
The importance of humility.

The importance of teachers not identifying with their role and thinking that students’ devotion is about them.

South Africa’s “Truth and Reconciliation” as a model.

Alan Watts – Nature of God

Nothing but good vibes.

No Trying, Just Tenderness – Amoda Maa

Published on Dec 18, 2018

In this video – Amoda talks about letting go of trying to fix or control our lives, our world, or our feelings and emotions. And instead she invites you to turn towards tenderness. Tenderness is a surrender of the mind that thinks it can fix things. Tenderness is a powerful way to dissolve the prison bars of egoic control. Tenderness changes everything. This discourse was recorded in Sebastopol, California in December 2018.

“On Death And Dying” by Daniel Redwood

Posted on December 18, 2018

Elisabeth Kubler-Ross, M.D. is one of a kind. She has been widely recognized as one of the foremost authorities in the field of death, dying and transition for over 20 years.

It might well be said that she invented this field as an area of legitimate discourse in the medical community. Her now-classic first book, On Death and Dying, is today considered the master text on the subject, and is required reading in most major medical and nursing schools and graduate schools of psychiatry and theology.

Her influence has reached far beyond these professional settings. Her lectures, workshops, media appearances and books have reached millions of people around the world, opening lines of communication on these issues which so profoundly affect us all.

Dr. Kubler-Ross received her medical degree from the University of Zurich in 1957. She began her pioneering work with the terminally ill at the University of Colorado Medical Center in Denver, and is currently Clinical Professor of Behavioral Medicine and Psychiatry at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. In 1979 the Ladies’ Home Journal honored her with a Woman of the Decade Award, after having named her Woman of the Year in Science and Research in 1977. She has also been the recipient of other honors and awards too numerous to mention.

Even a partial list of her superb books is lengthy: Questions and Answers on Death and Dying; To Live Until We Say Goodbye; Living With Death and Dying; Working It Through; Death, The Final Stage of Growth; On Children and Death; and AIDS:The Ultimate Challenge.

In this interview with Dr. Daniel Redwood, Dr. Kubler-Ross describes her strikingly powerful experience as a young woman visiting a concentration camp just after the liberation in 1945, an experience which was to shape the future course of her life. In this context, she addresses the highly controversial idea, first raised to her by a young Jewish camp survivor, that there is an aspect of Hitler in all of us. Recognizing the unspeakable horror of the Holocaust, she raises troubling questions on the nature of human evil and the roots from which it springs. She also shares her thoughts on the fear, denial and uncertainty which characterize much of modern Western humanity’s approach to death.

Due to illness, Dr. Kubler-Ross’ no longer teaches, lectures, or leads workshops.

Elisabeth Kubler-Ross Interview

DR: What has led you to devote so much of your time, skill and attention to issues of death and dying?

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: It started in Maidanek, in a concentration camp, where I tried to see how children had gone into the gas chambers after having lost their families, their homes, their schools and everything. The walls in the camp were filled with pictures of butterflies, drawn by these children.

It was incomprehensible to me. Thousands of children going into the gas chamber, and this is the message they leave behind–a butterfly. That was really the beginning.

In this concentration camp there was a Jewish girl, and she watched me. I hope you understand, I was a very young kid naturally, who hadn’t gone through any windstorms in life. When you grow up in Switzerland, there is no race problem, no poverty, no unemployment, no slums, no nothing. And I went right into the nightmare of postwar Europe.

So I asked her, how can men and women, like you and I, kill hundreds and thousands of innocent children, and the same day they do that, day after day, they worry about their own child at home who has chicken pox. It just didn’t compute in my brain, you know, being very innocent and ignorant.

This young woman had lost all her brothers and sisters, parents and grandparents in a gas chamber. She was the last one they tried to squash in, and there wasn’t room for one more person, so they pulled her out. What she didn’t understand was that she had already been crossed off the list of the living. They never got back to her. She spent the rest of the war years in this concentration camp swearing that she would stay alive to tell the world about all the atrocities that she witnessed.

When the people came to liberate the camp, she said to herself, “Oh my God, if I spend the rest of my life telling about all these horrible things, I would not be any better than Hitler himself. I would plant seeds of hate and negativity.” She made at that moment a promise to whoever she talked to, God presumably, that she would stay in the concentration camp until she could learn to forgive even a Hitler. When she had learned that lesson, then she would be worthy of leaving. Do you understand that?

The last thing she said to me was, “If you would only know that there is a Hitler in every human being!” If we can acknowledge that Hitler and get rid of it, she said, we could then become like, what we now would say is, Mother Theresa.

And I thought, “She is crazy, I don’t have a Hitler in me.” A few days later, I hitchhiked back to Switzerland, because I was very sick. I was near death. I never made it. They found me unconscious in a forest in Germany, with typhoid. But before I ended up in a hospital (I was picked up half dead in a forest, unconscious), I had been so hungry. I had no food in my stomach for three days and three nights. I suddenly realized in the midst of this hike, that if a small child would walk by me with a piece of bread in its hands, I would steal that piece of bread from that child’s hand.

This was like an illumination in my head. I said, “Now I know what she means, that there is a Hitler in all of us.” Depending on the circumstances, you can do horrible things, which you would never even consider when you have a full belly.

That was the beginning of my journey. When I went back to Switzerland, I said I’m going to study medicine, and I’m going to understand why people, from beautiful, innocent, gorgeous children, turn into Nazi monsters.

What we are doing now in our workshops is to get in touch with your Nazi monster in you, symbolically speaking, and get rid of it so that you can indeed become a Mother Theresa.

But that was the beginning, and I am eternally grateful for that experience.

DR: Is there any good reason to be afraid of dying?

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: No, if you have enough people who love you, who will see to it that your needs are met, so that if you request to die at home you will be allowed to die at home. If you don’t want to die in a hospital, you should at least be able to go to a hospice.

For that, you need a support system around you, people who really know you, because people don’t volunteer that. You have to speak up as a patient. If you can’t speak anymore, like I couldn’t speak after my stroke, you need somebody who speaks up for you. I hope that when I die, if I can’t speak anymore, that they at least let me go to my farm and die at home, where I can have a cup of coffee and a cigarette. Which is a bad habit, but I know it’s a bad habit.

DR: Do you think there’s such a thing as a “sacred inconsistency,” such as your smoking cigarettes, which is justified even though destructive?”

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: If we would only live “healthy,” we would probably all have to be on a macrobiotic diet, and not enjoy coffee, not enjoy meat, not enjoy Swiss chocolates, not smoke, not even breathe the air we breathe in. I mean, the planet Earth has been so polluted with so many things, there is not a place on planet Earth where you could live a totally healthy life.

We should all try to live as healthy as possible. I mean, I grow vegetables for over 100 people, and it’s a totally organic garden, and it’s healthy. We live off the farm, and it’s totally self-sustaining and self-supporting. But I have my weaknesses. I drink caffeine-free coffee, not that it matters terribly, but at least I make an attempt to live healthier. And as I get older, I can’t drink alcohol anymore. I used to like a glass of wine, and I can’t do it anymore.

I think that as you evolve spiritually, automatically your body tells you what is acceptable for your body and what is not. I could not now smoke the way I used to smoke when I went to medical school and worked nights. That’s where I started smoking, to keep awake. I can’t drink 15 cups of coffee,which I still did 20 years ago. Now I have caffeine-free coffee.

I survive. Eventually, when my body tells me it’s time to quit smoking, I will quit smoking. But if somebody tells me you can’t smoke, you can’t do this, you can’t do that, the aggravation of this constant nagging is, I think, more damaging to my health than if I listen to my own body and live accordingly.

I have beef on my farm. Maybe once a year I have beef. Not that I don’t like it anymore, I just don’t have the desire for it anymore. I think everybody who is on a path of spiritual evolution, which all human beings are at different levels . . . you will know yourself what you have to give up. It will be one giving up after another. But it is replaced with things that are much more precious and much more valuable than what you give up. But we don’t tell that to people, because then they do it for the wrong motivation.

DR: Do you find that there are great differences between cultures regarding attitudes toward death? Which ones do you feel have the most healthy approaches?

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: Yes, like Mexicans. They go and visit the graves. They bring food, they talk to them, they have a feast. There are lots of cultures who have much less of a hangup. The old, old, old cultures are also much more natural. In the more sophisticated, more materialistic Western world, even to die costs a fortune.

They put shoes on the dead that are comfortable to wear, and silk pillows, and put rouge on the cheeks, so they look like they’re only asleep. It’s so phony and so dishonest. But that’s more of a modern day deterioration. In the old days, the farmers died here just like in Switzerland. They had what you call a wake. It was in the house, in the best living room. People came. I remember my neighbor. I was able to say goodbye to him, I was allowed to touch him. I touched for the first time in my life a dead body. My father talked to him, like he could hear him, and I was very impressed by that.

Nothing was covered up with rouge and lipstick and makeup and all that baloney. Things have really deteriorated in the last hundred years, and more in the big cities than in the country. There are still places in the country here where it’s much more natural. But that changes very rapidly now anyway.

DR: Does the belief in reincarnation, or the lack of such belief, strongly influence people’s feelings about death?

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: It comes up very, very rarely with my patients. Very rarely. Those that believe in reincarnation, sometimes they’re annoyed that they have to come back, you know, that they haven’t done what the could have done and should have done. My patients, you understand, are usually more indigent and not terribly educated. Many of my patients don’t know anything about reincarnation.

It makes not much of a difference. What makes a difference is if your spiritual quadrant is open. If you have a faith, any faith, any, that is solid and internalized, you have much less of a problem than if you are a wishy-washy Protestant or a wishy-washy Catholic or a wishy-washy Jew.

Of the religious groups, there are some that have a much harder time than others. The Jewish people have a terrible issue about death. I tried to find out why they have such a problem. I asked lots of rabbis. It’s one of the few religions I know of, where if you ask twenty rabbis, you get twenty different answers. One says you continue to live through your son and your son’s son. And what happens if you have no son, if you only have daughters? Do you understand?

Let me ask another rabbi. “You will survive in their memory.” Well, after a hundred years, nobody remembers you. If you have not concretized your concept, then you have a heck of a time.

DR: How can an atheist or agnostic most constructively deal with the inevitability of death? Is there an existentialist sense of angst that enters , and…

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: (interrupting) You have no problem!! When I started this work, I wouldn’t know what that was. I was raised Protestant. In my heart I was Catholic, and I was made into a Jew. For 22 years I was a little bit of everything. Then I worked with dying patients, and I began to realize that we’re all the same. We’re all the same human beings. We all are born the same way.We all die the same way, basically. The experience of death and after death is all the same.

It only depends how you have lived. If you have lived fully, then you have no regrets, because you have done the best you can do. If you made lots of goofs– much better to have made lots of goofs than not to have lived at all. The saddest people I see die are people who had parents who said “Oh, I would be so proud if I can say ‘my son the doctor.’” They think they can buy love by doing what mom tells them to do and what dad tells them to do. They never listen to their own dreams. And they look back and say, “I made a good living but I never lived.” That, to me, is the saddest way to live.

That’s why I tell people, and I really mean it literally, if you’re not doing something that really turns you on, do something that does turn you on, and you will be provided for to survive. Those people die with a sense of achievement, of priding themselves that they had the guts to do it.

DR: Is there ever any justification for not being honest with someone who is dying, about the fact that they are dying?

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: You have to be honest, but you don’t have to be totally honest. You have to answer their questions, but don’t volunteer information for which they have not asked, because that means they’re not ready for it yet. If somebody thinks you’re a good guy if you tell them the whole truth, that there’s nothing else we can do, this is baloney.

Without miracles, there are many, many ways of helping somebody, without a cure. So you have to be very careful how you word it. And you never, ever, ever take hope away from a dying patient. Without hope nobody can live. You are not God. You don’t know what else is in store for them, what else can help them, or how meaningful, maybe, the last six months of a person’s life are. Totally changed around.

So you don’t just go and drown them in “truth.” My golden rule has been to answer all the questions as honestly as I can. If they ask me statistically what are their chances…I had a wonderful teacher, who once said that of his patients 50 percent live one year, another 35 percent live two years, and another so-and-so many per cent live two and a half years, and so on. If you were very smart and added all the percentages up, there was always one per cent left. And the real shrewd ones said, “Hey, you forgot, what about that last one per cent?” And he always said, “the last per cent is for hope.” I like that. He never gave it to them with 100%. He was fantastic.

DR: Could you tell us about your work with the AIDS babies?

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: What bothers me most is that we have been able to get only a few out of hospitals. It’s horrible to get them out. They do not want to discharge them to private families. We have 154 families who are waiting to adopt an AIDS baby, or to become a foster mom to an AIDS baby.

DR: Why?

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: It’s monetary gain. The institutions get $1000 a day per baby. They get research grants, and they do research on them. They are the pin-cushion babies. They do research and nobody stops them. Nobody says, “one bone marrow per week is too much.” That has to stop. They need to be held and cuddled and loved, and see butterflies and grass, and be able to go outside and live as normal a life as humanly possible in the short time they have.

If you do that, they just blossom like a flower.

DR: With the children you have seen who have gone from being HIV-positive [carrying the AIDS virus] to being HIV-negative, what particulars were there in those cases that you feel made the difference?

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: The only brief way I can tell you is that they were totally marinated in love. Totally. You understand that from a scientific point of view, those are children who had the antibodies of their mothers, and if there is bonding, and if there is love and cuddling and all the things children need to survive, then they begin to develop their own antibodies. And about 10% of all our babies will become negative, if they get the bonding, if they get the one-to-one. It’s not such a big miracle from a medical point of view.

But people have to know that not every HIV-positive child is born with AIDS, and has to die with AIDS. That is not true. They can get well.

DR: That message certainly has not gotten across yet.

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: No, it hasn’t.

DR: Please tell us about the Elisabeth Kubler-Ross Center in Virginia. What is your main work there?

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: We are building a place which was supposed to be for giving the workshops, on my own land so I don’t have to travel so much anymore. The [surrounding] community is petrified of me. I am called the AIDS Lady, and they say I am of Satan. They are all reborn Christians. They got up [at a community meeting] and said, “if you call for an ambulance, we will not respond.” They said, “I am a reborn Christian, but if you ever send one of these kids to school, the school will be closed.” So they give me a very hard time.

They arranged to only give us permission to house forty people, which makes it impossible for me to do my workshops as planned on my one million dollar project, on that land. So we thought, if that has to be, that will be. We’ll still be able to serve and help people. So what we’ll probably do is use it as a training center. We train a lot of people worldwide. And we will give some workshops there too. So it will serve its purpose, but exactly what it is going to be after they have finished the harassment, I don’t know.

They have shot bullets through my bedroom window, because they are convinced that I am hiding some AIDS babies. But that’s, you know, the stuff you have to live with.

DR: Is the community there divided about this? Is everyone there feeling so negatively?

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: I have old neighbors and sick people in the neighborhood that I visit, and they are the best neighbors any human being could have. They’re a handful. The others are quiet, because they are all inter-related. If one would dare to say something nice, they would probably be shot during hunting season. So they’re very guarded. It’s all intermarriage and all fanatic, and they’re all hunters. I’m sure it’s an aggressive minority, but they’re very aggressive, and the others are so intimidated.

But if I see them alone, I know there are lots of good people there. I live in the forest alone. I am not afraid of the bears nor of the hunters. I feel very protected.

Eventually, if AIDS eventually goes into the community, maybe there will be a change. But anybody who has AIDS in my community, they would be lynched if it were known. So they probably will disappear, for years to come, until there is somebody who can’t get away, and that may be a child. And then maybe things will change. It will change in time, if I live long enough. And if I don’t, at least I planted some seeds.

DR: What goals do you have for the remainder of your life?

ELISABETH KUBLER-ROSS: To continue as long as I can.

Daniel Redwood is a chiropractor and writer who lives in Virginia Beach, Virginia. He is the author of A Time to Heal: How to Reap the Benefits of Holistic Health, and is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. He can be reached by e-mail at Redwoods@infi.net. A collection of his writing is available on the World Wide Web at http://www.doubleclickd.com, and also on the New Age Forum of the Microsoft Network.

Source: AWAKEN

The Nature of Reality – Deepak Chopra at MIT

Published on Dec 11, 2018

The Nature Of the Mind and Ego – Leonard Jacobson

Posted on December 17, 2018
by Leonard Jacobson: The nature of the mind and ego.

Anita Moorjani – The Transformational Power of Healing

Published on Dec 17, 2018

If you haven’t heard Anita speak before, you’re in for a treat! She is a natural-born speaker and was thrust into the global speaking circuit by Dr Wayne Dyer, who discovered her story.

Over the years, Anita’s work has continued to develop and grow, and during this day-long workshop, she will be unveiling some of her newest work from her ever-evolving repertoire! She has a knack for expressing mystical knowledge in a simple, down-to-earth and practical manner, making it comprehensible and easy to follow for everyone. The day will comprise of meditations, practice and content that has been purposefully designed for this workshop, to help participants delve deeper into her work and connect it to their own healing process.

Anita will take her participants on a journey to uncover the roots of their issues through her sessions and deep meditations. Her work has helped countless people over the globe to attain healing and wellness. If you are struggling to recover from physical conditions, her guided journey will help you discover what’s preventing restoration from taking place, so that you can heal.

During her meditations, Anita uses sound healing therapy specifically designed to elicit a deep awakening. She will also illuminate some of the mysteries behind transformational experiences and healing, making them easier to understand and more accessible for you, so that you can continue to stay in that space long after you have left the safe arena of the workshop environment.

Awaken Interviews Byron Katie – What It Means to Awaken

David Welch: What does it mean to awaken? Is there a process leading to levels or a permanent state?

What are the signs we are making progress? Who and what are we when we are awake?

If you’re trying to monitor your progress on your spiritual path—if you think you have any idea how far along you are—you might want to save yourself the trouble. There’s no attainment, because you already are what you want to become. Everything separate vanishes in the light of awareness.

When you realize the truth, you realize that it’s no accomplishment. You haven’t done anything; the accomplishment is just the joy of being received by the very thing that you already are. It’s the mind being met by the mind, without opposition. It isn’t personal. The truth sets us free from any attachment to the concepts “self” and “other.” There are no humans; there is no mind; it’s all a dream. The practice of inquiry deletes everything, as long as mind believes that it exists even as mind. The projected world unravels first, and then mind, and any trace that even mind ever existed. That’s my world. When it’s over, it’s over.

The only thing you need to know about enlightenment is whether believing a particular thought is stressful or not. Does the thought hurt or doesn’t it? If it doesn’t, good: enjoy it. If it does hurt—if it causes any stress or uneasiness—question it, and enlighten yourself to that thought. Suffering is optional. It doesn’t have to last for years. It can get down to months, weeks, days, minutes, seconds. Eventually, when the same thoughts arise, the ones that used to make you suffer, you’re at ease with them. In fact, you’re lit; you walk down the street shining like a thousand-watt light bulb. When you think “I need my mother to love me,” you just laugh, because you’re enlightened to that thought, and the next one, and the next.

As it does The Work, mind can lose its grip on identity safely, gently. When you question your stressful thoughts and surrender everything that “you” thought you were, you come to the place where you wonder, “Without that thought, what am I?” Just because an identity appears doesn’t make it true. No one knows what he or she is. The minute it’s said, it isn’t.

Once it thoroughly questions its thoughts, the mind projects a world that’s completely kind. A kind mind projects a kind world. If someone else sees something that’s not perfect, the clear mind can’t comprehend that at first, because it can’t project it. But it remembers its ancient dream-world, when it believed that too, so in the stillness there’s a kind of reference-point, an echo. It’s always grateful for how it sees things, and it understands how others see them. That leaves a lot of energy for it to make amazing changes in the moment, because its clarity keeps none of the options hidden. This is a fearless state of being. There’s no limit to it.

David: Do you have daily rituals or practices that you follow or recommend?

Katie: I wake up. I brush my teeth. I shower. And I let the day show me what’s next. As for recommendations, I invite people to do The Work as a daily practice, if they want to have a happy life.

David: What is the purpose of your life?

Katie: My job here is to make as many people as possible know that there is a way out of suffering. I don’t expect them to do The Work; I just want them to know that it exists.

David: Who inspires you?

Katie: People who are brave enough to question their own stressful thoughts.

David: If our world is potentially looking down the barrel of an environmental catastrophe, how do we live our lives? What are your thoughts about climate change, the preservation of our planet, and the future of humanity?

I have looked down the barrel of a real gun pointed at me, and on several occasions have heard fearful, innocent people threaten to kill me, and never for an instant was I afraid. Fear is the story of a future. How could I know that the man would pull the trigger? How can I know that an environmental catastrophe will happen or, if it does happen, that it will be a bad thing for the planet? Once you understand this, and begin to live in reality, not in your thoughts about reality, life becomes fearless, loving, and filled with gratitude, whatever the nonexistent future may bring.

The war with reality always sees catastrophes looming, whether these are planetary or personal. It’s a very painful way to live. Maybe an environmental catastrophe will happen; maybe it won’t. In the meantime, I go about my business as if there were no life and no death (and there isn’t). My house is powered by the sun, the car I drive is a hybrid, I’m careful about recycling, I vote for people who say they are concerned about global warming, I support environmental causes. I’m fearless, worry-free, and I do whatever I can. “Get solar panels,” the mind says, and there is no valid reason not to, since all thoughts have been tested by inquiry. The panels are installed, my electric bill is two dollars a month, and at some point I will have put back all that I’ve used, and more. This will match my existence: all traces gone, a grateful life given back to what it came from.

I once gave a talk to a group of environmentalists. It was at a Bioneers conference in San Francisco, and hundreds of people came to listen. Many of these people had given their lives to saving the planet. I talked for a while about my commitment to environmental action, which seems to me the sane and kind thing to do. Then I asked for their thoughts about the environment. They were living with a great deal of anxiety, even terror, they said—an enormous burden on their shoulders. But many of them had open minds and were willing to question the thoughts that were causing them so much stress. I helped them do The Work on thoughts such as “Something terrible is going to happen,” “I need to save the planet,” and “People should be more conscious.” They discovered how these thoughts were driving them crazy, and how the thoughts have opposites that could be just as true.

After a few hours of intensive inquiry, I asked them to imagine the worst things that can happen if we continue to poison our beautiful planet and invited them to make a list. “The planet will become uninhabitable for humans. Thousands of species will become extinct.” And so on. Once they had made their list, we questioned some of their statements, and I asked them to turn the list around: instead of “The Worst Things That Can Happen to Our Planet,” I asked them to retitle their list “The Best Things That Can Happen to Our Planet,” then to find specific, genuine reasons why each item on the list was true. How could it be that the best thing for our planet that it becomes uninhabitable for humans, for example? Many of them didn’t want to go there at first, and there was a lot of resistance and many upset questions, but these were courageous people, and eventually they found valid reasons why every item was the best thing that could happen. “It might be good for some endangered species not to have humans around.” “It would be good for insects.” “It would be good for the rain forests.” “We wouldn’t be pumping and mining the life blood out of the planet.” “Who knows what intelligent species would evolve if we were gone?” They had been dealing with discouragement and burnout for years, and some of them later thanked me and told me how empowering this exercise had been for them.

One of the things you discover when you begin to practice inquiry is that the world doesn’t need saving. It has already been saved. What a relief! The most attractive thing about the Buddha was that he saved one person: himself. That’s all he needed to save, and when he saved himself, the whole world was saved. All his years of teaching—forty years of apparent compassion—were just the forward momentum of that one moment of insight.

For more information or visit thework.com.

David Welch:
is the founder and CEO of Awaken Global Media and Chief Editor of AWAKEN.com. He is the Producer of the award-winning movie “Peaceful Warrior” and a member of the Directors Guild of America and Screen Actors Guild. David is a master practitioner of Neuro-linguistic programming, a certified Kundalini Yoga instructor and has a continuous, committed and daily yoga, meditation and Qi gong practice.

Source: AWAKEN

Our Natural Potential: Beyond Personal Development, The Stages of Enlightenment – by David “Davidya” Buckland (Author)

In the last decade, we’ve seen an unprecedented growth in spiritual awakening. Why is this happening? How are we to understand the nature of enlightenment? Is it a normal part of human development we had forgotten how to culture? What is the underlying causal mechanism? What are the common differences in experiencing the unfolding? How can we support people making progress without a decent road map? Can we understand this profound natural potential?
Our Natural Potential will show you the underlying process and the main stages of enlightenment based on an 8,000-year-old Vedic text. Each stage has its own distinct reality, sense of self and the world. We’ll explore the two aspects required to support a full unfolding and detail the reality of each stage.

Enlightenment is not a goal but rather a platform for living a fuller, richer life well beyond any description. This book will discuss how to culture further development and recognize common symptoms and issues. It will allow you to put spiritual teachings into a broader context.

Be prepared to have some of your concepts about the spiritual journey broken. It’s a far greater potential than most people recognize.

David Buckland is a former IT consultant who lives on Vancouver Island in the temperate rain forest of SW Canada. He began his spiritual journey in the mid-70’s. On a long retreat soon after, he began witnessing full time and refined perception clicked on with a bang. He has now been meditating and exploring consciousness for more than 40 years.

Soon after awakening in 2007, he began writing on-line under the nickname “Davidya.” The name and related blog (Davidya.ca) soon took on a life of it’s own.

In 2011, he earned an MA in Vedic Science, studying Vedic literature, Sanskrit, and world religions. He has observed and spoken with many people having shifts in consciousness and has been working to synthesize historical understanding with modern experience.

Our Natural Potential talk by David Buckland at SAND2015

Using the Alexander model from psychology, David will illustrate that normal human development takes us progressively within. However, without suitable understanding and support, most people stall development part way along. Correct that and the inward development progresses. Once we reach consciousness beyond ego, we shift into the Transpersonal stages of development that psychology has begun to explore.

Using the approach from the Yog Vasishtha of the Ramayana and from Ayurveda, David will outline the two main processes of Transpersonal development that unfold our natural potential. On the one side, we have the 3 primary stages of consciousness unfolding to itself through an apparent individual. This includes a more complete context for Nonduality. On the other side is the unfolding heart and refinement. These two process are often referred to as the masculine and the feminine. It is together that there is a complete unfolding and embodiment.

This approach offers a framework for understanding the vast variety in how an unfolding shows up and a way to put descriptions from throughout the ages into a larger context.

Treat Yourself with Kindness: Peter Russell

Published on Dec 13, 2018
In this short extract from a Q&A session at SAND Italy, Peter Russell suggests that kindness is a learning process, a practice to interact with people, including ourselves, in such a way that the other feels loved and respected. Deep down that’s what we want, and we all want exactly the same thing.

David Buckland – 2nd Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

David grew up on the SW coast of Canada. He began witnessing full time during a 6-month retreat in the mid-’70s then the lights came on and celestial perception began. It soon became clear that Self was awake within but had not woken up to Itself through this form yet. Self co-existed with an identified ego. Subtle perception continued to unfold in a myriad of ways.

With a more outward stroke into career, marriage, and family, inner development continued but took a back seat to life’s responsibilities.

Then in 2005, much of the old life fell away and spirituality moved back to the foreground. After some feedback and darshan with Lorne Hoff, Self at last woke up to Itself here. Probably because of the long witnessing, this was quickly followed by a series of profound shifts in Being. (see my first BatGap interview) And then transcending Being into Brahman. In 2011, David was awarded a graduate degree in Vedic Science.

In this interview, we had an extended preamble to touch on the earlier shifts, then we discussed the ParaBrahman shift, pure Divinity, and how embodied Divinity is waking up laws of nature. This process will help raise the presence of Divinity in consciousness.

In the second part of the interview, we touched on the book Our Natural Potential describing the 7 stages of enlightenment, then explored some related topics.

For over a decade, David has been blogging on a wide range of subjects related to unfolding enlightenment. Under the nickname Davidya, he has posted close to 2,000 articles. During the Science and Nonduality Conference in 2017, David gave a talk on the stages described in this interview.

Website: http://davidya.ca

Book: Our Natural Potential: Beyond Personal Development, The Stages of Enlightenment (Rick Archer wrote the Foreword.)

Part 1:
Stages of Witnessing

The Three Parts of Awakening

Experience vs Being

Stages of Development in Consciousness

3-way Dynamics of Consciousness

Understanding Unity

The Appearance of the Doers (Devata)

The Koshas or sheathes

The Levels talk @ SAND18

Free Will and Determinism

Unity into Brahman or Beyond Consciousness

Subtle Perception

The 16 Kalas

ParaBrahman

Pure Divinity

Laws of Nature Waking Up (from dormancy)

Being Cosmic (body)

Awakening the Body (laws becoming enlightened)

Inherent Intelligence

Devata and Geometry

Samyama

Part 2: (about 53 minutes in)
Our Natural Potential book that explores the stages in more detail.
What is Nonduality?

The Gunas in Awakening

Knowing God

Gradations of Awakening and 5 subjective styles

Kaivalya, the Enlightenment of Yoga

Cognition, forms of

The Chakras

Understanding Your Energy System, Part 1

Mahamarmas

The Awakening Intellect (Resolute )

Styles of Teachers

Styles of Enlightenment

Atman and Sattva (Bhavas)

Karma and the Awake

Adyashanti – What Orients Your Life?

Published on 15 Dec 2018

What is your orienting principle in life? What is worth orienting your entire existence around? Adyashanti invites you to explore this vital life inquiry by honestly bringing the light of awareness to every belief that you have. This inquiry investigates and dismantles your conditioning, moves you beyond belief, and grounds yourself in reality.

Excerpted from “The Orienting Principle of Being”:

Quotes:

“To ask yourself, ‘Who am I?’ is a way of questioning every idea, every belief, and every assumption you’ve ever had about yourself. It’s taking that light of awareness and focusing it down, and starting to dismantle what is untrue.”

“To get really honest, all of a sudden we start to see that so many of the beliefs that we operate in from day-to-day don’t actually often have a grounding in reality.”

Nostradamus Predictions For 2019

Nostradamus Predictions For 2019. Nostradamus 2019 predictions for USA, world, future and more. The words of Nostradamus were duly remembered. Because of their strong opposition against magicians and wizards, the leaders of the Romano-Catholic Church would have preferred to burn this dangerously exact prophet alive. For many interprets of Nostradamus’ Belts, the text is full of prophecies regarding extremely violent contemporary events – from the rising of Hitler to power, to the assassination of both John F. Kennedy and his little brother, Robert.

Time Is Never Actually Experienced – Rupert Spira

Published on 14 Dec 2018
A 13 year old boy asks, ‘Why do we lose a sense of time when we are sleeping?’

Heaven revealed on Earth – Leonard Jacobson

The enlightenment teachings of Leonard Jacobson, awakened spiritual teacher

Finding Our Way To No Story ~ Richard Moss

Published on Dec 3, 2018

Richard invites us to understand one of the deeper fruits of meditative self-awareness: Being present in our bodies, living the immediacy of each moment free from being manipulated by unconscious levels of self-identity.

Sean Webb – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

As the author of a book that was used to influence millions of voters in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election through social media disinformation campaigns (without his knowledge), Sean Webb probably knows the human mind as well as anyone can. From his work in logically modeling human emotions for the world of Artificial Emotional Intelligence, to his real-world practice as an author, speaker, and guide to helping individuals supercharge their minds and lives with the knowledge of how their mind works, Sean pushes the bleeding edge of mind sciences to the next level. The interesting part; Sean credits his knowledge to a conscious awakening he had 20 years ago which unfolded how the mind, the universe, and consciousness works both within and outside the human body. And science is proving him right. Over the last 20 years, Sean has become one of the world’s leading experts in how the human mind works, particularly in the area of human emotions, the driving force and motivation of all human actions globally. His work is used by universities and engineering firms to teach emotional intelligence, the foundations of artificial emotional intelligence and his discoveries have proved so effective, that his work is currently being turned into programs to address addiction management and the mitigation of PTSD after early amazing successes within those applications. As an alumnus of Georgia Tech’s Advanced Technologies Development Center, Sean has spent years solving complex systems problems for cutting edge technology and supercomputing companies. His latest complex system solve is associated with the mind; how to model mind processes, how to manipulate mind output, and how to use those disciplines to our collective human advantage. His heart lies in this last portion of the project; teaching individuals about our minds so as to understand the thought processes that steal our happiness and block our ability to enjoy life. He loves sharing the practical neuroscience of how to hack the mind to generate happiness from within without any strings attached, and without changing any of life’s external conditions. He has indeed discovered a new door into the deep mind manipulation, where only practiced meditation and psychedelics have been able to take us before. “And the simple fact is that I pulled it all out of the void,” Sean tells us. Sean has spoken at Science of Consciousness, Science and Nonduality, UNC, UGA, ASU, Emory, Georgia Tech, for numerous multinational corporations, and at NASA. Check out Sean’s work at MindHackingHappiness.com. Sean and his wife are licensed foster parents and are active in numerous children’s and animal charities.

Books: Mind Hacking Happiness Volume I: The Quickest Way to Happiness and Controlling Your Mind Mind Hacking Happiness Volume II: Increasing Happiness and Finding Non-Dual Enlightenment

How to stop suffering Pt.2 (Rupert Spira)

“You keep opening yourself tot he feeling until you can honestly say that there is no resistance in you to the feeling.”

Only when you can live with the feeling forever suffering suddenly disappears.

Have you tried completely surrendering to suffering? Why are we so afraid of doing it? Comment below.

A talk by Rupert Spira. Animated by the “Human Being: User’s Manual”.

How to stop suffering Pt.1 (Rupert Spira)

“Suffering is resistence to life.”

“It is the because the self has mixed itself up with what it is aware of.”

“Liberate yourself from self-imposed limitation and understand that the ‘I’ cannot suffer because it cannot offer any existence to experience.”

How does one achieve such state? What tools do we use for the self-inquiry of this kind? Is it enough to sop suffering? Comment below.

A talk by Rupert Spira. Animated by the “Human Being: User’s Manual”.

Adyashanti – The Truly Awakened State

Published on 7 Dec 2018
The truly awakened state is a state of wholeness. Within wholeness, you are no longer referencing polarized ways of viewing experience, such as form and formlessness—you are simply experiencing everything as one seamless whole. Adyashanti explores how in the truly awakened state, wholeness informs your experience of being.

Excerpted from “Full Spectrum Wholeness”:

Quotes from this Video:

“As our own spiritual perception matures, it’s defined more by wholeness than anything else.”

“You can have that experience of being a particular human being, of being nothing, of being everything—but the end result is wholeness.”

Eckhart Tolle Talks – Life Will Become Better If You Start Changing From Now

Published on 7 Dec 2018
Eckhart Tolle Talks – Life Will Become Better If You Start Changing From Now.

Contemplating the Nature of Experience – Rupert Spira

Watch a five minute video of Rupert Spira’s introduction to the perennial non-dual understanding.

Enlightenment Can Never Be Claimed By a Person

Published on Dec 7, 2018

In this conversation we discuss how to determine that the Neti-Neti process is complete and then explore the next step.

Deepak Chopra on Achieving Mind-Body Balance

Advances in science and public health are increasing longevity and enhancing the quality of life for people around the world. In this series of interviews with the Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging, 14 visionaries are revealing exciting trends and insights regarding healthy longevity, sharing their vision for a better future. The Longevity Innovators interviews highlight new discoveries in biomedical and psychosocial science, as well as strategies to promote prevention and wellness for older adults.

Deepak Chopra, founder of The Chopra Foundation and co-founder of Jiyo ( a “well-being service provider” app) and The Chopra Center, is a world-renowned pioneer in integrative medicine and personal transformation. Time magazine has described him as “one of the top 100 heroes and icons of the century.” In an interview with the Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging, Chopra spoke about his lifestyle choices for well-being and healthy aging and how people can use their brains to achieve health and happiness.

Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging: Why did you decide to launch the Jiyo app? What is the mission and your vision for its impact?

Deepak Chopra: I launched Jiyo to create a global community for total well-being. I refer to Jiyo.com as the “internet of well-being,” a platform for people all over the world to get knowledge from experts in multiple areas: physical, emotional, professional, social, financial, and spiritual.

The experts are personally chosen and curated by me, and online courses are offered on everything essential to enhanced well-being and personal evolution — self-awareness, higher consciousness, sleep, stress management, meditation, movement, yoga, breathing exercises, nutrition, love, relationships and grounding.

My hope for Jiyo is to help create a critical mass of people engaged in personal and social transformation. Only then can we achieve what everyone desires, a more peaceful, just, sustainable, healthier, and joyful world.

How can we strive to find purpose and meaning in our lives?

Finding purpose and meaning in our lives demands that each of us reflect on fundamental questions: Who am I? What are the core values of my life? What do I want for myself and the world? And what am I grateful for? If we really investigate and are committed to these questions, life has a way of providing the answers.

What lifestyle choices have you made for your well-being and healthy aging?

I’ve adopted the things that I recommend to anyone who wants enhanced well-being:

I sleep 8 hours every night.
I practice meditation and yoga daily.
I walk 10,000 steps every day.
I cultivate healthy emotions like love, compassion, joy, gratitude and equanimity.
I make sure my diet has a maximum diversity of plant-based foods. I avoid food that is manufactured, refined, processed and high in fat and sugar.
I take a week of silence every year.
Lately, as an experiment, I also ground myself to the earth through devices when I am in urban settings and am not in direct contact with nature.
In our society, where some people do not get enough sleep, how important is having a restful night to the practice of meditation?

A good night’s sleep of eight to nine hours for the average adult is very important for experiencing the full benefit of meditation, beginning with inner stillness and alertness but also physical enhancements like improved self-regulation. If we have not slept properly, meditation generally turns into naptime.

Sleep, therefore, comes first. Along with [Next Avenue Influencer in Aging] Rudolph E. Tanzi at Harvard Medical School, we have created a brain entertainment device called Dream Weaver that helps people who have trouble falling asleep by getting them into the brain wave frequency that induces both the dream and deep sleep states.

How can people properly use their brains to achieve health and happiness?

The human brain has three components — the lower or instinctive brain, the emotional or limbic brain and the cortical or intellectual brain. By practicing meditation and self-inquiry, by cultivating healthy emotions, and by not being impulsive and reactive, we can integrate our three brains — this is conscious evolution.

Homo sapiens alone have the capacity to transcend genetic programming, which controls physical evolution. By pursuing evolution in a conscious way, we also enhance our capacity for insights, intuition, imagination, and creativity.

Are we missing key information about improving brain health?

Brain health was an obscure field 20 years ago, and many findings are still provisional. For example, it is strongly suggested that low-level chronic inflammation and treatable infections in the brain may be vital to preventing and perhaps curing Alzheimer’s disease —only time will tell.

In the meantime, the recommendations for brain health don’t vary greatly from general wellness practice:

Healthy sleep habits
Stress management
Healthy emotions
Healthy nutrition
Remaining curious, alert and mentally challenged throughout life
What is brain plasticity and what impact does it have on disease prevention?

Brain plasticity means that the brain isn’t fixed and static. It has the capacity to increase the number of neurons, known as neurogenesis, and also the connections between neurons, known as synaptogenesis. Rehabilitation from strokes, for example, has been revolutionized since my days in medical school thanks to this new knowledge.

But for healthy people, brain plasticity can be enhanced through mental practices. I call these practices metacognition. Metacognition is conscious awareness of experience as it is happening, along with mindful awareness of our choices as we make them. These possibilities are discussed in Super Brain, coauthored by Rudy Tanzi.

How would you advise people who are going through difficult times?

First, recognize that all experience is impermanent. The only invariant or non-changing factor in every experience is awareness. Cultivating self-awareness through a daily spiritual practice helps us navigate difficult times.

But everyone is different, and we have to be realistic. Advising someone suffering from chronic depression to be more self-aware is probably impractical when what’s needed immediately is to improve their symptoms and relieve their mental pain.

The real secret to happiness, however, is universal: seek your source in pure consciousness, and you will find that happiness is included in the ground plan of existence. Such an agenda is a tall order, I know, but this has been the ultimate cure for centuries and hasn’t worn out.

By The Milken Institute Center for the Future of Aging

Source: Next Avenue

Sandra Ingerman – Buddha at the Gas Pump Interview

Sandra Ingerman, MA, is an award winning author of twelve books, including Soul Retrieval: Mending the Fragmented Self, Medicine for the Earth: How to Transform Personal and Environmental Toxins, Walking in Light: The Everyday Empowerment of a Shamanic Life(CD or eBook version), and The Book of Ceremony: Shamanic Wisdom for Invoking the Sacred into Everyday Life. She is the presenter of eight audio programs produced by Sounds True, and she is the creator of the Transmutation App. Sandra is a world renowned teacher of shamanism and has been teaching for more than 30 years. She has taught workshops internationally on shamanic journeying, healing, and reversing environmental pollution using spiritual methods. Sandra is recognized for bridging ancient cross-cultural healing methods into our modern culture addressing the needs of our times.

Sandra is known for gathering the global spiritual community together to perform powerful transformative ceremonies as well as inspires us to stand strong in unity so we do our own spiritual and social activism work while keeping a vision of hope and being a light in the world.

She is passionate about helping people to reconnect with nature. Since the 1980’s thousands of people have healed from past and present traumas through the classic cross cultural shamanic healing method Sandra teaches called Soul Retrieval.

She is a licensed marriage and family therapist and professional mental health counselor. She is also a board-certified expert on traumatic stress. Sandra was chosen as one of the Top 10 Spiritual Leaders of 2013 by Spirituality and Health Magazine.

Sandra has two new books released in 2018. The Hidden Worlds was co-written with Katherine Wood and is a novel written for young adults to help them navigate the changing world. And The Book of Ceremony: Shamanic Wisdom for Invoking the Sacred into Everyday Life was written for a shamanic and general audience on how to bring the sacred into daily life by performing shamanic ceremonies designed for our times and the challenges we are facing.

The Power Of Conscious Awareness | Gelong Thubten

At A-Fest Montego Bay 2017, Gelong Thubten, the Tibetan Buddhist Monk who trained the movie cast of Dr. Strange, reveals the secret to strengthening your mind and the biggest misconceptions about pain, bliss, and meditation.

ABOUT A-FEST

A-Fest is an invite-only transformational event that gathers an extraordinary community of change-makers and visionaries who are driven by epic ideas to impact the world – entrepreneurs, employees, artists, leaders, innovators, visionaries and more.

The festival takes place twice a year in paradise locations around the world. Here, you will receive powerful training, profound mind shifts, bio-hacking techniques, deep connections, incredible adventures and unique opportunities to multiply your impact and give back to humanity, so that you can play an even bigger game and significantly expand your ability to accomplish bold things.

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